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Attaching wood legs to non-wood tabletop

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Forum topic by BeginnerBowlBill posted 06-19-2017 05:48 PM 333 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BeginnerBowlBill

13 posts in 139 days


06-19-2017 05:48 PM

Hi Folks, I need your input. I’m making a pottery wheel and I’m trying to attach wood legs and skirt to a laminate tabletop (Corian.) Any ideas on the best way to do so? I can’t use wood screws in the laminate, and I don’t think it would be strong enough to put lag screws into the end wood of the legs (If I picked up the heavy unit by the table top it might pull out. The skirt is only 1 inch wide, but I can change to a 2×4 if needed. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!


11 replies so far

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jerryminer

723 posts in 1164 days


#1 posted 06-19-2017 06:39 PM

I would make the base (legs and apron/skirt) like a table—separate from the top, and include either a full “sub-top”—like you would do in a kitchen counter situation—or a couple of “stretchers” across the top of the base, then use an adhesive caulk to attach the Corian to the base. (I did this to a rolling cart in my kitchen—20 years and holding)

Or, if you can live with visible fasteners, you could screw (or through-bolt) down through the Corian into the wood below .

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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papadan

3185 posts in 3091 days


#2 posted 06-19-2017 06:40 PM

I think I would try and epoxy some L brackets to the bottom of the corian. When the epoxy is cured I would screw the legs and aprons to the brackets.

-- Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity!

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papadan

3185 posts in 3091 days


#3 posted 06-19-2017 06:42 PM

Jerry types faster, he’s got a pretty good idea.

-- Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity!

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BeginnerBowlBill

13 posts in 139 days


#4 posted 06-19-2017 06:47 PM

I don’t mind bolts through the top or sides but I just don’t want it to crack the laminate. I don’t think glue would hold it. the heavy motor, pulleys, etc are under and if I lifted it with the top only it might come off. I will be moving it a lot. THanks

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builtinbkyn

1514 posts in 663 days


#5 posted 06-19-2017 07:02 PM

You can attach a plywood sub base to the Corian and then use any of the methods mentioned. It’s probably not a bad idea to use a sub base as it will strengthen the Corian and prevent the cracking you have concern about. Epoxy will work on both surfaces, to laminate them together. 3/4” ply is what I would use.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

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BeginnerBowlBill

13 posts in 139 days


#6 posted 06-19-2017 07:46 PM

That’s a great idea, thanks. But man I hate to make this thing heavier that it already is. Best idea yet though.

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jerryminer

723 posts in 1164 days


#7 posted 06-19-2017 08:13 PM



if I lifted it with the top only it might come off.

- BeginnerBowlBill

The solution to that: Don’t lift it by the top—lift it by the apron (goes for any table, really)

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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BeginnerBowlBill

13 posts in 139 days


#8 posted 06-19-2017 10:32 PM

With 5 kids, easier said than done. :)

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bondogaposis

4351 posts in 2074 days


#9 posted 06-19-2017 10:34 PM

+1 on jerryminer’s suggestion.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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bc4393

49 posts in 865 days


#10 posted 06-20-2017 01:45 AM

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builtinbkyn

1514 posts in 663 days


#11 posted 06-20-2017 04:25 AM



That s a great idea, thanks. But man I hate to make this thing heavier that it already is. Best idea yet though.

- BeginnerBowlBill


You should scuff the to be bonded side of the Corian by sanding with a corse grit paper. You also might consider using a silicone based construction adhesive or even pure silicone. That is what’s used to mount countertops. The epoxy will also work, but it’s more expensive than a tube or two of construction adhesive. Use a shallow notched trowel to spread the adhesive. A 1/16”x1/16” should work well.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

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