LumberJocks

Table Saws Injuries Study

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodturning forum

Forum topic by Robert12 posted 06-18-2017 05:37 PM 1405 views 0 times favorited 53 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Robert12's profile

Robert12

10 posts in 84 days


06-18-2017 05:37 PM

Hey everyone again,
I think that injuries while woodworking is a big topic so I created another infographic related to injuries while using table saws.

Image is too big, full link:
http://www.sawinery.net/infographics/table-saws-injury-study/

Let me know what do you think about it in comments.


53 replies so far

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

25357 posts in 2060 days


#1 posted 06-18-2017 05:43 PM

Always interesting

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1052 posts in 1520 days


#2 posted 06-18-2017 06:25 PM

I don’t agree with the stats.I myself have experienced kick back and cut off flying back ,Ive been hit in the belt area twice very hard.
Never even close to being cut by the blade.But I do use a magic wand to push wood past the blade when needed.

-- Aj

View SignWave's profile

SignWave

429 posts in 2757 days


#3 posted 06-18-2017 06:48 PM

I will echo Aj2 and say that I’m skeptical that 85% of tablesaw injuries involve blade contact and 15% do not. The only thing that makes sense to support these numbers is a reporting bias. By that I mean that the vast majority of tablesaw injuries that don’t involve blade contact are somehow left out of these numbers.

I’ve never had blade contact, but I’ve experienced kickback, dust in the eyes, etc. I’m not trying to introduce a counter-argument about the real risks of tablesaw injuries, btw. These are items that are introduced by the graphic itself.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115929 posts in 3299 days


#4 posted 06-18-2017 06:48 PM

Hi Robert Welcome to LJs
Interesting , the stats are pretty much what I expect.It’s kind of interesting that many of the post on Ljs that involve injuries start something like this first a horrible photo of missing finger(s) and then they say”I was one of those guys that said I’ve used a table saw for 30 years without one scratch why would I spend all that money and buy a saw with a safety mechanism?” Then they say” now I’m buying a SawStop.”

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5255 posts in 3385 days


#5 posted 06-18-2017 07:29 PM

Another worthless ‘infographic’

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2639 posts in 1710 days


#6 posted 06-18-2017 08:35 PM

The Consumer Products Safety Commission did a study of table saw injuries treated in an emergency room in 2007 and 2008.. They found that 88% were related to contact with the blade.

Perhaps, some of those who doubt the statistics could share their source for data and the results.

This says nothing about how often kick backs happen but only about the injuries severe enough to go to the emergency room. Maybe there are a lot of kick backs but the severity of the injury is low. There is no way to really tell as I can not find any statistics.

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

531 posts in 1657 days


#7 posted 06-18-2017 08:54 PM

He referenced his data source but he could have made it clearer by changing a word.

“Over 30,000 table saw injuries occur annually” is a true statement however for those hung up on things “Over 30,000 table saw injuries are reported annually” would clarify and make sure the average reader understands how the conclusions were derived.

As pointed out of course their is bias (if you are trying to use a different data set) as the data is based upon reported incidents (those that souhgt medical intervention). Of those that went to an ER, Urgent care, doctor etc…. 85% of the injures are do to blade contact nothing too complicated about it.

Maybe just take the link for what it is… risk based assessment based upon reported incidents. Just evaluate ones techniques, practices, and tools and make changes as you see needed.

View papadan's profile

papadan

3181 posts in 3090 days


#8 posted 06-18-2017 08:54 PM

I have to disagree with your stats. Some are just estimates not supported numbers and some are unexplained. You state that 75% of the missing blade guard cuts were because the user removed the guard, Who the hell removed the other 25%.LOL I am one of your statistics, cutting a really small piece off a board a couple days ago and in reaching for the cutoff my thumb touched the blade. 11 stiches! I have had kickbacks that have never been reported as have most all TS users, if it don’t require emergency room attention then it never makes the stats.

-- Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity!

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

284 posts in 681 days


#9 posted 06-18-2017 09:05 PM



I don t agree with the stats.I myself have experienced kick back and cut off flying back ,Ive been hit in the belt area twice very hard.
Never even close to being cut by the blade.But I do use a magic wand to push wood past the blade when needed.

- Aj2

Never is a funny word when it comes to a table saw….

View SignWave's profile

SignWave

429 posts in 2757 days


#10 posted 06-18-2017 09:30 PM

People are more likely to go to the ER for serious table saw injuries than for non-serious table saw injuries. That makes sense to me.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

View jonah's profile

jonah

1044 posts in 3020 days


#11 posted 06-18-2017 09:36 PM



I have to disagree with your stats. Some are just estimates not supported numbers and some are unexplained. You state that 75% of the missing blade guard cuts were because the user removed the guard, Who the hell removed the other 25%.LOL I am one of your statistics, cutting a really small piece off a board a couple days ago and in reaching for the cutoff my thumb touched the blade. 11 stiches! I have had kickbacks that have never been reported as have most all TS users, if it don t require emergency room attention then it never makes the stats.

- papadan


There are all sorts of situations where the guard gets removed by someone other than the user. For instance, the user’s coworker who removed the guard earlier in the day. Or the user’s boss, who removes all the guards from his job site saws because they get lost, stolen, or broken.

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

636 posts in 624 days


#12 posted 06-18-2017 09:44 PM

looks like a power point a 7th grader put together, and for that, im out.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2639 posts in 1710 days


#13 posted 06-18-2017 09:44 PM



People are more likely to go to the ER for serious table saw injuries than for non-serious table saw injuries. That makes sense to me.

- SignWave

Yes, this makes a lot of sense and also based on the statistics the most serious injuries are caused by contact with the blade.

View SignWave's profile

SignWave

429 posts in 2757 days


#14 posted 06-18-2017 09:48 PM


Yes, this makes a lot of sense and also based on the statistics the most serious injuries are caused by contact with the blade.

- Redoak49


We are in agreement, then. It certainly makes sense to me that injuries caused by contact with the blade are likely to be more serious than those that are not caused by contact with the blade.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

View papadan's profile

papadan

3181 posts in 3090 days


#15 posted 06-18-2017 09:50 PM

Jonah, most of this is about homeowners, nobody but me touches my tools. I removed the guard because it is a miserable design that does nothing but get in the way. My splitter is out of line with the blade and the guard is mounted to the splitter. No splitter, no guard. I thought I had and old guard off another saw to use on this one but couldn’t find it and can’t afford one right now. My Bad!

-- Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity!

showing 1 through 15 of 53 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com