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Question on Gluing Up Panels

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Forum topic by MikeB posted 12-08-2010 04:06 AM 1545 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MikeB

18 posts in 2309 days


12-08-2010 04:06 AM

I’m about to begin my second real project (the first being this Stickley ottoman from a Fine Woodworking article, finished piece here).

I’m interested in building a bookcase. I bought 25 bf of some nice D2S cherry and now have to go about making some panels. My question is less about technique than about tactics. I know that I need a glass like edge, cut with the grain, match the grain as much as possible, don’t overglue, put clamps above and below the panel, use cauls to staighten out edges if necessary. I will either use a Freud glue line rip blade on my DeWalt DW744X tablesaw or, if I can, get the local high school woodworking shop teacher to let me use their jointer.

My uncertainty is more about how to take my 7 1/2” to 8 1/4” wide D2S boards and turn them into 12” wide case sides, top, and shelves. Do I take the largest width board – say 8” width – and glue a 4” wide board to it, then rip and cross cut to size? Or, should I go for equally sized boards of say 4”? Or does it even matter?

I will try to take photographs of this project as I go along.

Thanks in advance for your help and advice.

Mike


12 replies so far

View Robsshop's profile

Robsshop

899 posts in 2441 days


#1 posted 12-08-2010 04:26 AM

IMO, You are looking to create seamless transitions in the appearance of two mating boards,so it is more about matching grain patterns and color , not so much what the dimensions are. I do also believe that there are different techniques for finishing Cherry to get a more uniformed result.

-- Rob,Gaithersburg,MD,One mans trash is another mans wood shop treasure ! ;-)

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JasonWagner

527 posts in 2646 days


#2 posted 12-08-2010 04:45 AM

I’m no expert: but I’ve heard it’s better to join smaller boards together to make a larger one (not that 8” is that wide). Also, if the grain doesn’t match up at least you’ll be symmetrical with 3 boards. It depends what you’re going for as well. Are you trying to make the book case look like it’s all one solid piece or like it was made from several pieces of the same species wood.

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

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okwoodshop

448 posts in 2641 days


#3 posted 12-08-2010 04:45 AM

I am wondering if your panels are going to be the full thickness of your boards? If you split them in half and book match the boards you will want to center the joint for the best look. Looking forward to your photos

View wseand's profile

wseand

2754 posts in 2508 days


#4 posted 12-08-2010 04:49 AM

Is this going to be a small BC, because 25bf seems a bit shy for a med. to large one. The only time I worry about the widths is if I cant get a good grain match and then I try for a more symmetrical look. Anyways good luck and keep us up to date on the progress.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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Kevin

462 posts in 2672 days


#5 posted 12-08-2010 05:15 AM

I’d probably pick the boards that have the best grain pattern and matching color. Some could be slightly off from the rest of them. Take the board and joint the edge then rip each one 4” wide. Do the same with the other board and dry fit the board to what you think is the most pleasing to the eye. You get those joints smooth and glued together, sanded and it will look like a solid piece of board unless you have a definate grain direction and alternate them.

Looking forward to photos as well.

PS: Oh you know you’ll need joint a face then plane the other side before gluing up, but thought I should mention it for good measure though :)

Kevin

-- Williamsburg, KY

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MikeB

18 posts in 2309 days


#6 posted 12-08-2010 05:29 AM

Bill – the 25bf doesn’t include the back, just the case sides, top, bottom, and three shelves, one of which I aspire to fix into the case with a sliding dovetail; if that’s too ambitious, then a dado.

I would say it’s medium sized. Here are the dimensions and calculations:

Depth – 12”
Height – 60”
Width 28”

I calculate that to 21.67 bf which means… you’re right, I’ll need more wood. :)

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MikeB

18 posts in 2309 days


#7 posted 12-08-2010 05:52 AM

Kevin, are you being serious about jointing and planing? I thought that the two edges that were to be glued to each other each had to be smoothed (jointed, cut with a really fine blade, etc.). I thought that for an n board panel, that the number of jointed or otherwise smoothed edges would be 2n – 2. Would that be right? 2 jointed edges for interior boards and 1 jointed edge for exterior or end boards, so a 3 board panel would have 2*3 – 2 = 4 jointed edges. Am I missing something? Misunderstanding your comment?

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Kevin

462 posts in 2672 days


#8 posted 12-08-2010 06:11 AM

Not sure there Mike. When I glue up panels I joint the edge of the board then face joint it. Take it to my table saw and usually measure around 4 inches. I then start ripping the board into several 4” x 7-8 ft strips. I will then take it to the planer and plan to thickness and final dimensions. Then i’ll cut close to final dimensions with my mither saw. The rips I get with my TS are smooth that the edges line up extremely nice. I then start gluing up 2 strips at a time until I get my overall size glued up. Start sanding then cut to final dimension.

Make sense or am I missing something here? You are building a panel like the sides of a bookshelf or a top for a table?

-- Williamsburg, KY

View wseand's profile

wseand

2754 posts in 2508 days


#9 posted 12-08-2010 06:20 AM

It really depends on the lumber you have. If you don’t have a surfaced or near flat face you may need to joint it first to get at least one face flat. A planer will not flatten cupped, or bowed wood. I believe this is what Kevin is getting at. Woodworkingonline has a great video on Squaring Lumber HERE:

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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MikeB

18 posts in 2309 days


#10 posted 12-08-2010 06:48 AM

Actually the wood is D2S to 13/16 and ripped on one edge. So I thought that I was pretty much set except for the one rough edge in terms of getting things squared up. Maybe I’d have to take 1/8” or thereabouts off the ripped edge if it had been banged around or dinged up, but that was all I thought I had to do.

I am intending to glue the boards together to make a single flat panel, like the side of case or a table top.

Edit: I just realized what face jointing is. I only thought there was edge jointing and planing. Now I understand the difference between planing and face jointing.

I hope that when I bought D2S R1E lumber, it had been face jointed if it needed it. But maybe not.

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Kevin

462 posts in 2672 days


#11 posted 12-08-2010 07:00 AM

Yeah, that’s what i’m getting at wseand. I get rough lumber usually in 5/4 or 6/4×8 x 10 and then I do the work :) I know when I joint,rip,plane etc that it will be pretty darn flat and square when i’m done.

If i’m missing something let me know, i’m always eager to learn new techniques :) I could have left a step or something out by mistake also. It’s just natural now when I get a board to go into my routine.

-- Williamsburg, KY

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wseand

2754 posts in 2508 days


#12 posted 12-08-2010 07:00 AM

You should be good to go.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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