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WIPE-ON POLY, OIL BASED, over PRE-CATALIZED LACQUER (10 year dining table)

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Forum topic by Fax posted 06-16-2017 07:28 AM 1524 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Fax

62 posts in 293 days


06-16-2017 07:28 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question maple finishing modern traditional

Hello Friends,
We have a big dining table that my wife bought in 2007 ( 80” x 50” )
I think it has an industrial finish, pre-catalized lacquer…
If I scuff the finish with 320 grit, would it be ok to apply OIL BASED WIPE-ON POLY over the entire table ?

Inside apartment I can’t spray lacquer, but I would love to apply a wipe on coat of poly.

About three years ago I applied some wipe-on poly on a small area to fix some scratches.
The poly didn’t peel off at all and held very well so far.
If poly is ok, should I apply a thin coat of Dewaxed Shellac as a seal coat first ?

Thank you very much for your advice!
Julian

-- Julian Paul Jones


7 replies so far

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Fred Hargis

4757 posts in 2329 days


#1 posted 06-16-2017 12:40 PM

The scuff sanding will work, but I’m thinking that table has seen some furniture polish (think silicone) over the years and that will keep pretty much anything form adhering….except shellac. If you are 110% positive it’s never been cleaned with that crap from the grocery store, you’re good to go. Otherwise, I’d clean it thoroughly with TSP (the real stuff, not the fake) and then coat it with dewaxed shellac.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Carloz

971 posts in 428 days


#2 posted 06-16-2017 12:58 PM

I would not hesitate to spray something as simple as a table top with a coat or two of lacquer inside an apartment. With hvlp not much lacquer escapes. But poly over shellac will work too

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Fax

62 posts in 293 days


#3 posted 06-16-2017 04:57 PM



The scuff sanding will work, but I m thinking that table has seen some furniture polish (think silicone) over the years and that will keep pretty much anything form adhering….except shellac. If you are 110% positive it s never been cleaned with that crap from the grocery store, you re good to go. Otherwise, I d clean it thoroughly with TSP (the real stuff, not the fake) and then coat it with dewaxed shellac.

- Fred Hargis

Hello Fred,
Thank you very much for your help!
Yes it has been polished many times before.
I will clean it thoroughly and apply dewaxed shellac first.

Could I do the same to the kitchen cabinets ? They look so dehydrated and dry. Over the years the finish, maybe a pre-catalyzed lacuer, industrial finish most likely, now definitely looks dull.
After the table is done maybe I can do the cabinets the same way.

-- Julian Paul Jones

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Fax

62 posts in 293 days


#4 posted 06-16-2017 05:06 PM



I would not hesitate to spray something as simple as a table top with a coat or two of lacquer inside an apartment. With hvlp not much lacquer escapes. But poly over shellac will work too

- Carloz

Thank you very much Carolz !
I don’t have a spray system yet. Maybe I will buy one from Rockler ot Woodcraft.
You think I could also use shellac and then oil wipe on poly to spruce up the kitchen cabinets the same way ?

I appreciate you help !
Julian

-- Julian Paul Jones

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Carloz

971 posts in 428 days


#5 posted 06-16-2017 06:51 PM

It depends on what they were made of and the state of the finish.
My kitchen cabinets are all very nice hardwood. However they were finished by some dummy who apparently did not know what he was doing. The cabinets are relatively new but the lacquer is flaking off. Apparently there is no point of applying a better finish over the weak sub-finish. I will probably try to remove the lacquer with some thinner. It does dissolve easily when I rub it with acetone.
In fact if your table top is wood not just thin veneer I would sand it down including stain if any and redo it from the bare wood. It guarantees better result than having some old cloudy finish visible under new coats.

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Fax

62 posts in 293 days


#6 posted 06-16-2017 07:15 PM



It depends on what they were made of and the state of the finish.
My kitchen cabinets are all very nice hardwood. However they were finished by some dummy who apparently did not know what he was doing. The cabinets are relatively new but the lacquer is flaking off. Apparently there is no point of applying a better finish over the weak sub-finish. I will probably try to remove the lacquer with some thinner. It does dissolve easily when I rub it with acetone.
In fact if your table top is wood not just thin veneer I would sand it down including stain if any and redo it from the bare wood. It guarantees better result than having some old cloudy finish visible under new coats.

- Carloz

The finish is not flaking. It is holding well, but has worn out and looks dull.

-- Julian Paul Jones

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ArtMann

686 posts in 652 days


#7 posted 06-16-2017 09:03 PM

My opinion on this matter is that you are taking a big risk that you can’t recover from if something goes wrong.

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