LumberJocks

JDS 2 hp cyclone

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by therookie posted 12-06-2010 03:32 PM 5101 views 2 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View therookie's profile

therookie

887 posts in 2288 days


12-06-2010 03:32 PM

I was just wondering if this is a good deal at $1300? and has anyone had any problems with it? as well as does it even work?

-- http://aewoodworks.webs.com


10 replies so far

View crank49's profile

crank49

3980 posts in 2432 days


#1 posted 12-06-2010 04:56 PM

You asked if it is a good deal; I would have to say no. Not from the perspective of a user, but as an engineer who has designed and installed dust control systems for over 35 years.

It’s a 2hp dust collector. There is no magic that makes one 2hp fan move more air than another. The design difference from one brand to another can only account for the balance point between static pressure and CFM volume. JDS, like most other (manufacturers?) suppliers of these machines, list the maximum static pressure and the maximun CFM in their brochure. These numbers are totally useless in terms of what the system can do. What is important is CFM . . AT . . ?? inches of static pressure. The Key word here is “AT”.

There are some good things about this machine.
- The cartridge type filter will have more surface area, and thus lower static pressure loss, than an equal size bag filter. It would be much better if it were rated to capture 0.5 micron particles instead of 1 micron. There are bag type filters that can catch 1 micron.
- There is a motorized flapper to help clean the cartridge; in case you forget to do it manually. Many other systems have a crank that you must turn by hand for this function.
- The cyclone serarator section appears to be below the fan inlet which is good because it lets the heavy stuff drop out in the can before it goes through the fan impeller.

The bottom line is this looks like a lot of money for an admittedly nice looking machine; but don’t expect that its performance will be prorportional to its cost. There are much less expensive ways to equal, and even exceed this machine’s capacity to capture dust.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5604 posts in 2693 days


#2 posted 12-06-2010 05:42 PM

If you are going to step up to a Cyclone, step up to at LEAST a 3HP unit. For the $$ you would be far better off copying CharlieL’s Delta 50-760 setup and adding a Wynn cartridge to it… Or even my cheapie HF 2HP / Wynn / Thien setup.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View WoodArtbyJR's profile

WoodArtbyJR

428 posts in 2426 days


#3 posted 12-06-2010 05:56 PM

Not sure if this is the information you are looking for but I bought a used Onieda 1.5 hp unit (about 750 cfm) a couple of years ago for $300. I replace my 1800 cfm Grizzly 4 bagger with it. The Onieda out performs the 4 bagger hands down…..Last year the impeller cracked and had to be replaced. Since I wasn’t the original owner and couldn’t remember the persons name I bought it from I had to pay for the part myself, otherwise they would have stood behind it. The short story is that the company was wonderful to deal with and the new impeller has no record of failure. Crank49 supplied you with some GREAT info and combined with the others you should be able to make a smart purchase. Good luck.

Jim

-- Jim Roberts, Port Orchard Washington

View Viking's profile

Viking

878 posts in 2656 days


#4 posted 12-06-2010 06:31 PM

Here is a vote for the Harbor Freight 2HP unit. Add a trash can pre-separator and Wynn cartridge filter and you will be very happy. HF has the 2HP DC on sale now for $189.99 and you will find HF 20% 0ff coupons in most WW magazines and others.

http://www.harborfreight.com/2-hp-industrial-5-micron-dust-collector-97869.html

If you just have a burning desire to spend $1300 plus I am sure that the JDS is a fine unit.

Good Luck!

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5604 posts in 2693 days


#5 posted 12-06-2010 07:01 PM

I’m sure the JDS is an excellent machine as well. I just have a little hesitation spending $1,300.00 on a 2HP machine… IF you are going to spend that much on a 2HP machine, the JDS is hard to beat though, some very thoughtful features on that thing… Of course if you want to buy American, I believe your choices there would be Oneida, and ClearVue…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5604 posts in 2693 days


#6 posted 12-06-2010 11:30 PM

Barry,

With the Thien baffle, you don’t get the scrubbing you do with a regular plastic trash can lid separator. I can pack my separator up to the bottom of the barrel, so probably 45 gallons of material before I get any notable blowby into the lower bag… While not a true cyclone, they are close enough for most of us…

Honestly, yeah a 2HP full on cyclone WOULD be an upgrade, but I am just not sure it would be worth that much extra $$... Now a 3HP model is a different story all together…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View thiel's profile

thiel

374 posts in 2753 days


#7 posted 12-07-2010 02:15 AM

I’ve got the 2hp JDS unit plumbed into my shop for about a month now. My longest run is about 35ft and it goes to my planer—and the JDS removes the chips super well.

It’s an expensive machine for sure, but I couldn’t find any other which had the same combination of CFM (1700), Sound Rating (74db), and Size (only 64 inches tall). It’s very well made—not in China, but in Taiwan, which is a big BIG difference.

Happy to answer any questions you have on it. My shop photos show the plumbing and the machine. Really like it.

Fan curve:

-- Laziness minus Apathy equals Efficiency

View thiel's profile

thiel

374 posts in 2753 days


#8 posted 12-07-2010 02:16 AM

BTW the JDS machine is $1299 with free shipping if you buy direct from them, so $1300 is not a deal, it’s just the price. Also, compare CAREFULLY the model number etc: Amazon has an older unit for sale but it would be easy to mistake it for the newer one.

The service from JDS has been top notch…. easy to get them on the phone and they really know the product.

-- Laziness minus Apathy equals Efficiency

View Jim's profile

Jim

38 posts in 2511 days


#9 posted 12-07-2010 04:31 AM

I’ve been looking at these myself. My problem is my shop ceiling is slightly less than 8’. This eliminates the ClearVue and several others. I like the compactness of the 2hp JDS but am a little concerned with the hp and $1800 for the 3 hp is a bit much for me. I found another alternative is the Oneida V-3000. It has a 3hp US made motor and is a little cheaper than the 2 hp JDS initially but with shipping is close to the same. I really don’t fully understand the cfm thing yet but I think Oneida uses real world figures.

I’m just getting started with my research so I am not sure about anything yet.

-- JimT

View crank49's profile

crank49

3980 posts in 2432 days


#10 posted 12-07-2010 07:14 AM

Jim, the graph shown by Thiel, above makes this CFM vs Pressure thing about as clear as it can be made.
On the left side you see CFM (cubic feet per minute) numbers increasing from bottom to top. Across the bottom you see Static Pressure (in inches water column) increasing from left to right. The big diagonal sloping line in the grid is the claimed performance of the JDS cyclone.

If you have a long run of duct with several elbows in it you would likely have a high static pressure requirement, maybe 9” for example, so look on the sloped line where it intersects the 9” axis. Then from that point slide across the chart to the CFM value on the left. It would be about 900. So this says the collector will move 900 CFM at the pressure of 9 inches. In theory.

I say, “In theory” because there is still one bit of information missing. We don’t know how much static drop is created by the cyclone itself. Bag and cartridge filters both start out with a very low pressure drop when they are clean, maybe 1” or 2”. Then, when they are full of dust, this pressure drop can increase to 9” or more. A cyclone, on the other hand will have a designed pressure drop which is constant. The pressure drop is created by the act of forcing the air flow to spin around in the chamber in a vortex; like a tornado in a can. Then the fan is pulling the air flow out the top of the center this vortex when it dosen’t want to go that direction; it wants to spin towards the outside because of centrifical force and sink down to the bottom. Low efficiency cyclones, like this one, can easily require a pressure drop of 4”, but this information is missing. I can’t tell if the numbers on the chart represent available pressure for the external duct and hood system, or the pressure developed by the fan. If it’s the latter, the pressure and flow generated by the fan, then you have to subtract the cartridge and cyclone pressure drops from what is given in the chart and that is what you have available to work with. Assuming it’s about 4” drop for the cyclone, 4” drop for the filter cartridge and you need 750CFM for your machines, then on the graph you can see 750CFM will have about 12” static to work with. So 12” -4” -4” = 4” available for the duct system.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com