LumberJocks

Lipping planer: any advice on how best to use? And how do you plane down edging?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Sark posted 06-15-2017 02:05 AM 1268 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Sark's profile

Sark

28 posts in 201 days


06-15-2017 02:05 AM

I got frustrated trying to hand plane 3/4” edging on a computer desk and side table. A friendly woodworker emailed me that he always using a lipping planer, take the edge down to about .002 to .005” above the table surface, and then hand-tool/sand the rest of the way till dead flat with the top surface.

It so happens that I have a lipping planer that I bought about 15 years ago, and almost never used and had sort-of forgotten about. What an idiot I had been! So today on a set of cabinets with solid wood edging (don’t like edgebanding) I got the lipping planer out and in about 30 minutes had planed the solid wood flat to the plywood surface. About 4 hours quicker than my previous job. (I’m no hand tool expert) Except for one gouge. Anyway, this is paint grade stuff so no harm done.

So you lipping-planer users: what advice can you give me? I learned that if the board your planing is cupped, you can gouge the plywood surface. Also if not held properly, the planer will chatter like any planer.

And now I’m curious what you non-lipping-planer owners do to get the solid wood edging dead flat to a plywood surface without cutting through into that wafer thin top veneer?


14 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3662 posts in 2149 days


#1 posted 06-15-2017 03:01 AM

I have one and can maybe help but need a picture and or which lipping planer do you have. At least post a brand and model.

A good lipping planer can save you a ton of time and do a very accurate job. They are on the expensive side but worth it if you doing a lot of edging.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Sark's profile

Sark

28 posts in 201 days


#2 posted 06-15-2017 04:24 AM

I have a Virutex AP98. Now that I started using again, I plan on doing a lot of edging.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4808 posts in 3801 days


#3 posted 06-15-2017 12:07 PM

That’s a new tool to me. Got a pic?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13751 posts in 3938 days


#4 posted 06-15-2017 01:54 PM

I’m not sure what a lipping planer is as well.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13751 posts in 3938 days


#5 posted 06-15-2017 01:56 PM

Ok. I googled it. Why would you not use a sharp block plane?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14860 posts in 2459 days


#6 posted 06-15-2017 02:13 PM

I agree, Wayne. Or a filister plane w/ fence would be ideal.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View Sark's profile

Sark

28 posts in 201 days


#7 posted 06-15-2017 02:27 PM

A lipping planer is a specialized motorized planer built to trim wood edging flush to the surface of the object you are working on, normally a desktop or countertop. The height of the cut is precisely controlled by a screw mechanism, and the planer slides along the top surface. It’s possible to plane within .002” of the surface without nicking or marring the plywood veneer.

The only reason to use it (and it’s a good reason) is that it’s much faster to use than a block plane. On the cabs I built yesterday, I put solid wood edging on all the plywood pieces and shelves. So to plane about 100’ of solid wood edging took me about 30 minutes with the power tool. And about an hour to sand dead flat after the trim. I couldn’t begin to calculate the time it would take me to hand plane that much solid wood edging. I’m not that good with a hand plane.

That being said, the tool is not fool proof. You need to learn how to use it. And its expensive, but I own one which has been sitting in a cabinet for so many years. So I was looking for some handy hints from more experienced persons.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14860 posts in 2459 days


#8 posted 06-15-2017 03:35 PM

I feel chastised. Disappearing back into the ranks now, good luck with your lipping planer.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3662 posts in 2149 days


#9 posted 06-15-2017 03:39 PM



Ok. I googled it. Why would you not use a sharp block plane?

- WayneC

If you have a big stack of edged shelves sitting on your work bench and had ever used a lipping planer you know why. I have both (plane) and lipping planer. I pick the lipping planer in a heart beat.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3662 posts in 2149 days


#10 posted 06-15-2017 03:54 PM

Sark,

I’m not sure how to answer your question other than to tell you it a pretty simple machine to operate. I have the lamellow cantex planer, never used the one you have. Key is set the blade to the right height and and above all keep it flat against the surface by continuously pressing down on big knob on the planer. While you getting familiar with your planer I’d just do straight (meaning edge one edge at a time and don’t going around corner at first.) One you get used to it your going to love it. Do some practice runs in the beginning.

With one of these lipping planer you don’t have to worry about grain direction like you do with a hand plane.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13751 posts in 3938 days


#11 posted 06-15-2017 03:58 PM

I think the answer is clear to my question. This is being done in a production shop at production volume. Make sense to me. I had taken it in the context of a hobbyist and wondered why a hobbyist would use a $600 or more power tool to do this. :)

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Sark's profile

Sark

28 posts in 201 days


#12 posted 06-15-2017 05:23 PM

I’m a self-taught cabinet maker, who took a hobby and made a second career of it when I got too old to be wanted in my white collar job. There is so much that I missed by not working in a commercial shop at production volume, or any other shop but my own. Our focus was on Euro cabinets, edgebanding and kitchen remodeling. So I’ve got a lot to learn, and appreciate your help.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3662 posts in 2149 days


#13 posted 06-15-2017 07:30 PM

Just a side note.

I’m not a production shop. But…...........I still like to get thing done.

If you go to places like the Felders owner’s group, the Festools owner’s group, Mini-Max owner’s group you find many many hobbyist with what many would call production machines.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13751 posts in 3938 days


#14 posted 06-15-2017 07:33 PM

The same could be said of the hobbyists that have full sets of LN planes. Likely true across the board.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com