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Good old saw blades

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Forum topic by Clarkie posted 06-14-2017 11:44 AM 518 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Clarkie

448 posts in 1681 days


06-14-2017 11:44 AM

Hello, just wanted to offer up a thought that came by my bench this morning. Favored or long time table saw blades kept all these years. I have five racks of the saws that have been with me for over 35 years now. The carbide is above the standard used today and the blades themselves are very durable. I was blessed years ago and acquired over 50 carbide tipped blades at an auction. At the time a very good friend of mine was in the business of sharpening tools. So, once every 2 weeks or so, I would drop off a couple blades. Through the last few years I have given most of them away to guys who appreciate having them. Now I look and see the remainder as being good work horses and now a days they rest most of the time. So, I was wondering that their must be other woodworkers who have favorite old blades they use when they want the best cut. Ok, that’s about it for now, thanks for listening. Have fun, make some dust. BTW, the blades are still kept in the wood carrier that was made for them by my friend.


10 replies so far

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ArtMann

691 posts in 656 days


#1 posted 06-14-2017 04:57 PM

Cell phone photography strikes again.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3662 posts in 2149 days


#2 posted 06-14-2017 05:01 PM



Cell phone photography strikes again.

- ArtMann

It really doesn’t need to.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Clarkie

448 posts in 1681 days


#3 posted 06-14-2017 06:10 PM

Thanks for straightening out the picture.. care to explain how?

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AlaskaGuy

3662 posts in 2149 days


#4 posted 06-14-2017 06:45 PM


Thanks for straightening out the picture.. care to explain how?

- Clarkie

I downloaded it to my windows 7 computer (desktop in this case) opened it with windows photo viewer. Then, rotated the photo, save it (actually is saves it automatically) and reposed it in my post.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Clarkie

448 posts in 1681 days


#5 posted 06-14-2017 08:29 PM

Hello Guy, well thanks for your help.

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2600 posts in 2837 days


#6 posted 06-15-2017 01:07 PM

I buy used blades form Habitat Re-store, yard Sales, garage Sales, Auction Sales. I pick them up cheap. Most people do NOT want to bother sharpening them ! (I sharpen my own)...In the last 2 years I am playing with old barn boards, re purposed lumber….there is ALWAYS a broken nail hidden inside each board. I have 2 dedicated rough cut blades to rip boards, eventually the carbide tips take a beating and I give the blade to a friend that paints pictures on saw blades.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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Clarkie

448 posts in 1681 days


#7 posted 06-15-2017 02:39 PM

Hello Chips, great way to use and recycle, koodos to ya.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4515 posts in 978 days


#8 posted 06-15-2017 02:48 PM

FWIW, Harbor Freight has a circular saw blade sharpener. With a little fiddling and tweaking it works well. I would never use it on my good blades because it can’t hold the complex angles well enough. I do use it often on cheaper blades though just to resurface the carbide teeth. I don’t recall the price but I know it was worth it for me to stretch the useful life of cheaper blades that aren’t worth the cost of professional sharpening.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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bigblockyeti

4698 posts in 1560 days


#9 posted 06-15-2017 05:52 PM


I have five racks of the saws that have been with me for over 35 years now. The carbide is above the standard used today and the blades themselves are very durable.
- Clarkie

I’m a little curious as to what kind of carbide you have? The majority of my blades and bits are from Freud and they don’t have a “standard” but rather several grades with varying levels of toughness inversely proportional to their ability to hold and edge depending on what the job at hand requires. I am a huge fan of vintage tools and machines but cutting tool technology (saw blades included) has and continues to advance constantly. I realize the give a damn factor is exceedingly low with many budget manufacturers today and that has tainted the market more than a little but those who still strive to produce quality are able to do so. Do you have a picture of the blade holder? I threw one together a while ago and I’m not thrilled with it and am constantly looking for a better idea.

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Clarkie

448 posts in 1681 days


#10 posted 06-15-2017 06:59 PM

Hello Big block, I will be able to send a picture of the holder tomorrow, it is just a simple one and serves the purpose it is intended for well. As for the carbide on the blades, most of the blades come from the 60’s and 70’s. The manufacturers turned to a throw away blade after that and the middle ground was a carbide that was to be sharpened only with what is known as a green stone. So if the “weekend sharpening” shops tried to sharpen them, it was of no use without the green stone. I only know this by trying to have the newer blades sharpened after my friend passed on, they never got it right. When my friend sharpened the blade, it lasted much longer than the other guys, reason being he sharpened the whole bit. The tip, the sides and the face, and also cleaned the blade. Reason for the cleaning was so his diamond wheels didn’t get the junk from the grimy blades guys would give him. They thought themselves smart, buying the rusty blades at flea markets and bringing them to him, that way they got a brand new blade back without any effort on their part. Ok, thanks for your response, have fun, make some dust.

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