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Should I raise a burr on this tool?

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Forum topic by Spacehog posted 06-13-2017 03:52 AM 678 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Spacehog

86 posts in 1363 days


06-13-2017 03:52 AM

Topic tags/keywords: scraper surface prep burr cabinet scraper card scraper number 80 scraper

Ahoy friends! I had a question about a tool I am not very familiar with. I guess it’s called a surface prep tool, but it looks like a scraper of some kind. Here is a link to the exact tool I have. I’m not sure if it’s even a woodworking tool, and I won’t really be using it for one of my projects. Instead, I got this tool for scraping off some peeling paint on the exterior of a house. I used to work for a painter, but he never used this particular tool. For this project, I was told that this tool would be the best way to scrape off the old, chipping paint. I suppose that I could just use the thing the way that it comes out of the package; and maybe I will end up doing that. HOWEVER! I recently got into different kinds of cabinet scrapers (Stanley No. 80 and various card scrapers) which are really amazing in my opinion.

So here is what I want to know: Should I raise a burr on this scraper like I would with a Stanley No. 80? I know that the card scrapers can work a bit even without a burr. Having said that, I very much prefer having a burr with the card scrapers than not having one. Maybe having a burr with this surface prep tool will greatly enhance its effectiveness. Or maybe it makes no discernible difference and would be a waste of time. So please let me know what you think! I saw a tool at Woodcraft that looked very similar which you can see here. Although I’ve never used this tool either, and I know basically nothing about it.

But yeah, if someone has used tools like this please let me know what you think. I’m a big fan of the scrapers that use a burr, but I’m not sure if this thing is one of those tools. Thanks in advance!

-- Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might...


7 replies so far

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3207 days


#1 posted 06-13-2017 04:00 AM

That is a paint scraper, with the carbide blade I would just use it the way it came. Be carful not to let it dig in too much and ruin the wood you’re scraping.

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1688 posts in 2698 days


#2 posted 06-13-2017 04:07 AM

Since the scraper you have is clearly a carbide blade edge it is impractical if not impossible for the user to raise a burr on the scraper blade like you do on a card scraper.

Good Luck!

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

811 posts in 1280 days


#3 posted 06-13-2017 05:00 AM

+1 ^^ what they said. You won’t be able to raise a burr on the carbide edge.

Pay no attention to the “sharper than steel” claim. Harder than steel, yes. Sharper than steel? Not if the steel is sharp!

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View Spacehog's profile

Spacehog

86 posts in 1363 days


#4 posted 06-13-2017 05:54 AM

Thanks everyone! I didn’t even consider the carbide blade, but what you’re saying makes perfect sense.

-- Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might...

View rjpat's profile

rjpat

41 posts in 1817 days


#5 posted 06-14-2017 10:52 PM

Just be careful about any metal (nails, etc), for they chip very easily. a great way to remove old paint, as long as it is not to thick

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

747 posts in 334 days


#6 posted 06-15-2017 12:26 AM

I have that same tool, used it to scrape some of my house a few years ago. Papadan is right, the edges of the carbide blade will dig in if your siding is at all cupped so be careful and ease the edges slightly. And they do chip easily so set your nails before you try to scrape. I also bought and used a Paint Shaver Pro- basically a modified angle grinder with carbide blades and a special fence. This tool works super fast but again struggles with cupped or bowed siding. In the end, I found that a ROS with 60-80 grit disks was the best tool for prepping my siding for paint.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

9772 posts in 3267 days


#7 posted 06-15-2017 12:11 PM

JMO, Stew-Machttp://www.stewmac.com/Luthier_Tools/Types_of_Tools/Scrapers/StewMac_Ultimate_Scraper.html?utm_source=google&utm_medium=shopping&utm_campaign=2017-06-gp&gclid=CjwKEAjw4IjKBRDr6p752cCUm3kSJAC-eqRt0eqbS5W2FwO63aP9CRlrNg2-oZUTRkFGeK_CCzeLtBoCCpzw_wcB offers the best scrapers you can buy.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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