LumberJocks

Sanding: do you over dimension your wood to take sanding into account?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Holbs posted 06-13-2017 03:27 AM 1399 views 0 times favorited 31 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Holbs's profile

Holbs

1728 posts in 1869 days


06-13-2017 03:27 AM

My blog entry of screwing up my plantation shutter frames: http://lumberjocks.com/Holbs/blog/108321
Rockler super cray science computer says to use 1 1/16” thick x 2” wide stiles. I dimensioned them exactly to that measurement. Then I took out my ROS and screwed up. Mistakes were made and learned. But now I wonder for my next batch of lumber… should I add 1/32” or even 1/16” extra into dimensions to take into account the sanding that needs to be done?

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter


31 replies so far

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

1861 posts in 738 days


#1 posted 06-13-2017 03:35 AM

It doesn’t hurt to cut them a hair fat to allow a little off for sanding.
Something else that may help you sanding edges, stack 4 or 5 together and sand them all at once.
Sometimes you can clamp a bunch together, sometimes it’s easy enough to hold them by hand.
This will help keep a flatter edge and won’t take as much off when you’re sanding them.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

1728 posts in 1869 days


#2 posted 06-13-2017 03:37 AM

that’s a great idea of my OSS with 4 1/2” drums: to stack them. Will keep that in mind

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3208 days


#3 posted 06-13-2017 03:37 AM

How are you demensioning your lumber? I have never had an issue of too much sanding to make a piece too small.

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

1861 posts in 738 days


#4 posted 06-13-2017 03:40 AM



that s a great idea of my OSS with 4 1/2” drums: to stack them. Will keep that in mind

- Holbs

I don’t think using the oscillating sander to get a straight edge is a good idea. Even with a fence it may be difficult, nothings impossible but…..

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

1728 posts in 1869 days


#5 posted 06-13-2017 03:40 AM

I started with 120 on my 5” ROS then 220 (currently out of mid 100’s). I assume…I was too aggressive with my sanding. Lost about 1/32” on one side and same on other for near or over 1/16” material gone. I’ve actually never researched ROS sanding before as I never thought it was an issue. Apparently, for me, it was :)

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

1861 posts in 738 days


#6 posted 06-13-2017 03:42 AM

Keep your rails long until you get your stiles finished,
that way you can accommodate any discrepancies from sanding.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

1728 posts in 1869 days


#7 posted 06-13-2017 03:42 AM

Jbay…I’ll have to test with some scrap lumber (ha…I have lots of scrap now!). If stacking doesnt work out, I can always go single. The OSS should make quick work of things either way.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3208 days


#8 posted 06-13-2017 03:51 AM

Holbs, how are you sizing your pieces

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

1728 posts in 1869 days


#9 posted 06-13-2017 03:52 AM

Dan… I am dimensioning via my Wixey digital readout on my planer 1 1/16” height, for example (verified via calipers after running the stiles through).

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3208 days


#10 posted 06-13-2017 04:03 AM

Then you shouldn’t need any more than a light sanding with maybe 220 or 340. Your pieces should be just about ready to go from the planer.

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

1728 posts in 1869 days


#11 posted 06-13-2017 04:08 AM

There were visible machine marks that needed to be sanded.
Maybe that is my confusion. I thought sanding was always required 80, 120, 180, maybe even 220 even after jointer/planer. Hmm…I would feel foolish if not needed after machining, and that only 180 or 220 is needed.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

1728 posts in 1869 days


#12 posted 06-13-2017 05:02 AM

I also think Charles Neil’s “trace coating” will help a bunch as well, that I need to start practicing.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

View jonah's profile

jonah

1471 posts in 3138 days


#13 posted 06-13-2017 10:10 AM

You most definitely do not need to sand with 80 grit coming off the jointer/planer. Try starting with 150 grit or even just lightly scraping with a card scraper to remove mill marks.

View Bluenote38's profile

Bluenote38

219 posts in 228 days


#14 posted 06-13-2017 10:23 AM

First, it’s wood not steel so 0.03” is pushing the irrelevant limit. Second unless you are starting with a really crappy surface finish you shouldn’t need to be sanding off more than about 0.010”. With the carbide blades and machines we have today, the surface finish out of a planer or off a table saw (mine at least) are in the neighborhood of 20-50 microns for hard maple. I usually hit the surface with 320 then wipe and finish (mostly to break the edges).

As far as the 80/100/200 that’s for hand tools and old surfaces. 60/80 grit is primarily for flattening. A hand saw will give you a rough edge and hand plan will leave scallops deep enough to see and feel (you can feel 0.002” difference) so you need to use aggressive grits to flatten and smooth (Luddites may disagree). Btw this is where a scraper comes in. Properly tuned it will leave about a 15-20 micron surface on maple and if you are really good with it you can get down even a bit further.

-- Bill - Rochester MI

View edapp's profile

edapp

61 posts in 1269 days


#15 posted 06-13-2017 11:24 AM

replace your blades if the finish is that bad. I never sand more than lightly by hand with 120 and up if really necessary. I use a block plane to clean up edges, lightly sand as stated and wipe down with a rag. This is assuming all of the pieces have gone through the planer, jointer, or tablesaw which would leave a surface nearly finish ready.

This sounds like the type of situation where too much information became a bad thing, you are overthinking it (IMO).

showing 1 through 15 of 31 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com