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Wood kitchen sink- Can it be done?

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Forum topic by StumpyNubs posted 1233 days ago 7479 views 3 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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StumpyNubs

5968 posts in 1302 days


1233 days ago

I have made my mind up. As part of my complete kitchen remodel, I am making a wood kitchen sink. I know it’s possible because I’ve seen some websites selling beautiful wooden sinks for the bathroom, even bath tubs. So there’s no reason to believe the idea couldn’t be applied to a kitchen sink.

My idea is a farmhouse style with two basins. I haven’t decided on the wood, which is why I am posting this thread. The sinks I’ve seen are made of teak. But I want something more interesting. I know some types of wood are water resistant and even resist bacteria, like teak and paduk. But does the type of wood make as much of a difference as the type of finish?

And what kind of finish would that be? It would have to withstand not only water, but spills of kitchen messes like hot grease, all while making the seams water tight.

Any ideas?

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com


19 replies so far

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Karson

34797 posts in 2902 days


#1 posted 1233 days ago

Jim Here is a web site on wooden Kitchen sinks.

And here is a post on woodweb.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

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twissty

26 posts in 1354 days


#2 posted 1233 days ago

Maybe something like a marine epoxy to coat all sides of the wood.
You could even add a layer of fiberglass cloth and clearcoat it with epoxy. The final product would be as tough as an acrylic or fiberglass sink. and pretty much maintenance free

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WoodLe

150 posts in 1298 days


#3 posted 1233 days ago

2nd what twissty said. Fiberglass cloth and epoxy are wonderful products. It’s what I used on my wood strip canoe that I have listed in ‘my projects’. Totally waterproof.

-- www.largewoodslabs.com Apple Creek, Ohio

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Dark_Lightning

1579 posts in 1611 days


#4 posted 1233 days ago

Solutions so far seem to rely on the wood for the structure only. Is that what you are after?

I’d personally rely on a ceramic finish, which, for me, means cast iron or fiberglass. But that’s up to you.

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grizzman

6470 posts in 1805 days


#5 posted 1233 days ago

well jack i think he wants to see the wood…wouldn’t your idea cover up the wood…i didnt know there were such things as wooden sinks…this will be interesting to see come about…good luck…grizzman

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

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StumpyNubs

5968 posts in 1302 days


#6 posted 1232 days ago

I don’t want to cover the wood with anything, that would defeat the purpose. I suppose fiberglass could go on the underside, but I don’t think there would be any need for something to reinforce or strengthen it, wood should be quite strong.

The issue is a durable finish that will withstand a beating as well as cooking spills and stay looking good.

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

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Steven Davis

109 posts in 1416 days


#7 posted 1232 days ago

You might want to look at woods used for boats – same problem, just keeping the water “in” instead of “out”.

-- Steven Davis - see me at http://www.playnoevil.com/ and http://www.stelgames.com/

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Div

1653 posts in 1442 days


#8 posted 1232 days ago

Firstly you want a very stable wood which is why teak is a good choice. A penetrating epoxy like WEST will make for a dueable finish.

I couldn’t(wouldn’t?) afford teak and didn’t feel like the sticky stuff. My double sink is made from selected old growth tightly grained quartersawn PINE! I oiled the hell out of it with boiled linseed oil. It must be soaked right through! The whole thing is experimental but so far it is doing well. I used a waterproof polyurethane glue for the laminations, it was built in layers to get large rounded corners. Resorcinol glue would be excellent as well, didn’t have any at the time.

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

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a1Jim

109347 posts in 2079 days


#9 posted 1232 days ago

I would suggest Epi it will hold up to water with out a finish and is very hard it’s even fire rated.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

523 posts in 1682 days


#10 posted 1232 days ago

correction – Ipe

You can coat with fiberglass and still see through right?

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

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WoodLe

150 posts in 1298 days


#11 posted 1232 days ago

Jim, If you’re not familiar with fiberglass cloth and epoxy, look at how to make wood strip canoes. Looks just like varnish with beautiful wood showing through!

-- www.largewoodslabs.com Apple Creek, Ohio

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StumpyNubs

5968 posts in 1302 days


#12 posted 1232 days ago

Div- you have actually made a sink from wood? Is it used in the kitchen?

I know teak will work, but price is always an issue. Plus, I really want something unique, perhaps an exotic like zebrawood. I wonder if you could build the sink out of a hardwood like maple, or even a softwood like pine and laminate 1/4” thick “veneer” over it with a much more expensive, more beautiful wood? If it’s all coated with a sealer, should’t it work?

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

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StumpyNubs

5968 posts in 1302 days


#13 posted 1232 days ago

WoodLE- I am not familliar with the fiberglass process for kayaks. Does it leave a smooth, clear surface like a glossy finish would or does it look like the wood is covered with fiberglass?

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4037 posts in 1358 days


#14 posted 1232 days ago

Jim, there is another way using resins, thin like CA. Using a vacuum pump. If you get extremely dry wood Zebrano is good. The vacuum pulls out the air from the wood then the resin gets in. I think it is also called stabilised wood. What is nice about this method is that you can have a mat finish.
jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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a1Jim

109347 posts in 2079 days


#15 posted 1232 days ago

Thanks Jason I guess my dyslexia kicked in. It is Ipe a common deck material .

http://www.woodsthebest.com/ipe_decking/ipe-wood.htm

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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