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Forum topic by Spinnerbug posted 06-11-2017 10:00 PM 591 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Spinnerbug

17 posts in 183 days


06-11-2017 10:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: walnut goblet

I am new to woodturning. I have taken a few classes on spindle turning and have a new laguna 18/36 lathe which I love so far. I was turning a 25 yr old piece of Walnut this am, trying to make a small goblet. I turned the piece round, and then chucked it in my Super Nova chuck. All was good. I used a 1 5/8 Forstner bit to drill a 2 In hole for the goblet interior. All was going good. Took my time and went slow. Forstner is sharp. When I was done and down to 2 in depth, I stopped an noticed small cracks occurring on the sidewalks.

WHY ? I am trying to attach pics…no luck so far.

Is the wood to dry and old? Had no trouble turning it into round cylinder, no catches…sharp tools.

Any thought would be greatly appreciated as I do not know what i did wrong.

Harry

-- Harry, Pennsylvania


20 replies so far

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Rick_M

10605 posts in 2213 days


#1 posted 06-11-2017 10:24 PM

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TheDane

5327 posts in 3496 days


#2 posted 06-12-2017 12:14 AM

Heat? Drilling too fast or not clearing chips from the bit?

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Rick_M

10605 posts in 2213 days


#3 posted 06-12-2017 01:41 AM

My previous post was meant for a different thread.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Dustin

404 posts in 574 days


#4 posted 06-12-2017 12:17 PM

To sort of follow up on Gerry’s post, could it be that there were already super thin hairline cracks, but the heat from drilling opened them up enough that they’re visible?

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

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Sawdust2012

100 posts in 1546 days


#5 posted 06-12-2017 12:33 PM

Sounds like”heat checking”. Forstners build up a lot of heat quickly. If I were you, I’d quit altogether and send me that lathe.

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Spinnerbug

17 posts in 183 days


#6 posted 06-12-2017 01:09 PM

Hi Dustin,
Thanks for your input. I think you are right. I noticed some hairline cracks in the piece on the end I was putting the bowl. I started over and cut a new walnut block and hopefully cut off any cracks. I have it ready to go and am still wanting to use the forester bit..I know I could hollow it out and will try that next…just seeing the different ways of doing it.

-- Harry, Pennsylvania

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Spinnerbug

17 posts in 183 days


#7 posted 06-12-2017 01:10 PM

Sawdust2012, It is sure nice lathe, I will say that. Ill keep it…..

-- Harry, Pennsylvania

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Spinnerbug

17 posts in 183 days


#8 posted 06-12-2017 01:15 PM

Dustin, I think I have a pic that shows the original hairline crack if you look close….This was before I chucked it…cracks is coming from headstock end. Not sure it is clear enough to see.

-- Harry, Pennsylvania

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LeeMills

458 posts in 1134 days


#9 posted 06-12-2017 01:40 PM

Only a suggestion but..
Since you are working on end grain, drill a smaller hole (maybe 3/4”) to the depth you want.
You then have a place for your spindle gouge or other tool to start the cut from the center towards the outside.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Bill White

4800 posts in 3794 days


#10 posted 06-12-2017 01:44 PM

As Mr. Dane posted, drill SLOW! I use forstners often, and really crank the speed down.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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hairy

2580 posts in 3365 days


#11 posted 06-12-2017 03:13 PM

I get my DC hose as close as I can to what I’m drilling. That helps to cool it. I don’t try to drill it all at one time, and put the hose against the hole between drillings. This also helps keep it cool.

The bigger the bit the slower the speed.

I also use a steady rest for all but small holes I drill on the lathe. I can have it on and off in a few minutes and it is good insurance to get a straight hole. This is more important the deeper you drill.

In my experience, walnut is the worst for heat cracking.

-- My reality check bounced...

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BenDupre

531 posts in 321 days


#12 posted 06-12-2017 10:23 PM



Only a suggestion but..
Since you are working on end grain, drill a smaller hole (maybe 3/4”) to the depth you want.
You then have a place for your spindle gouge or other tool to start the cut from the center towards the outside.

- LeeMills

I think Lee meant bowl gouge. Please do not put your spindle gouge on endgrain.

Fostner bit is a good way to do what you want. You might try drilling before you round it. But then you can center on that bore with a cone center. Also if heat is the problem go slow and clear the chips often.

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

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LeeMills

458 posts in 1134 days


#13 posted 06-12-2017 10:33 PM



I think Lee meant bowl gouge. Please do not put your spindle gouge on endgrain.

You can use a bowl gouge but you need the correct grind.
Here a few examples of using a spindle gouge.
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=hollowing+with+a+spindle+gouge
Or here a a few by Ray Key …master box maker if there is such a thing.
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=ray+key+woodturner+box

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Spinnerbug

17 posts in 183 days


#14 posted 06-12-2017 11:39 PM

I had success. I tried everything you all suggested and I have my first goblet. It won’t win awards but is my first. I found that there were hairline cracks in the first one.
I slowed forstner to 225 rpm and went slow with DC as hairy suggested.
Lee i watched Ray Key, very good info. I did mistakenly use the spindle gouge on the end, but did not like result.

I must work on hollowing for sure! My chuck worked well and I am at the finishing point with two coats of walnut oil and tommorrow am will put some wax on it and part it from lathe.
I have some pics and will get the on next post.

I really need to learn how to hollow out and make bottom and sides smooth and continuous.
Thanks everyone for sure—your input is very helpful.
Let me know your thoughts of the goblet so far-again its no. 1 for me —please be critical!

Harry

-- Harry, Pennsylvania

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BenDupre

531 posts in 321 days


#15 posted 06-12-2017 11:43 PM

The scraper is your friend inside to smooth things over. If you dont already have one, get a nice thick one. I also find round carbides useful on the final pass inside a bowl or box. Lets see tje result!

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

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