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Heating the finishing area

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Forum topic by BillyJ posted 12-03-2010 05:15 PM 1053 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BillyJ

622 posts in 1892 days


12-03-2010 05:15 PM

My shop is far from being complete, however, last night I was walking through HD and saw a very small wall mounted electric heater that caught my attention. It was a flush-mount, 1000w – 120v fan heater. The claim is that is will heat a small bedroom. After doing the calculations, it looked like it would do the job for a 10×10 x 10 finishing room. The unit would fit between the studs and is rather small.

Being as I am in a rather cold winter climate, does anyone use electric heat in their shop/finish area? Any thoughts about that as opposed to a ceiling radiant panel?

-- I've never seen a tree that I wouldn't like to repurpose into a project. I love the smell of wood in the morning - it smells like victory.


12 replies so far

View Rileysdad's profile

Rileysdad

110 posts in 1968 days


#1 posted 12-03-2010 05:33 PM

Billy, I’d have to say that if you’re using oil finishes or flammable solvents in your finishing area, the electric heater is a bad idea.

-- Measure twice, cut once, buy extra stock.

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 1673 days


#2 posted 12-03-2010 05:47 PM

When it comes time to finish a project I turn off all open flames and pilot lights as well as any open electric elements when using oil based products. I have the enclosed element type radiator electric heaters I use to maintain the heat while finishing.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

View ClayandNancy's profile

ClayandNancy

479 posts in 1704 days


#3 posted 12-03-2010 05:50 PM

I would think you would be alright with electric. Not having the flame of a gas heater. I’m looking for an electric heater for my shop, we are an all electric home and I don’t want to have the propane bomb in the backyard. This type of heater might work for me.

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1863 days


#4 posted 12-03-2010 05:52 PM

To keep my garage from being TOO cold, I use one of these

For a small space, like you’re describing, it might be just the ticket.

-- -- Neil

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ShopDogs

228 posts in 2046 days


#5 posted 12-03-2010 09:55 PM

Yes, Billy-Boy.
I use a 240V single Phase unit in my shop. It is also the AC unit. It keeps the shop in the acceptable range winter and summer. Most paint shops use radiant electric heat if they don’t have forced air available. They make sure there is ventilation of course, but you want that anyway.

-- ShopDogs, Tulsa, OK The tools aren't the problem-It's the organic interface!

View BillyJ's profile

BillyJ

622 posts in 1892 days


#6 posted 12-03-2010 10:01 PM

Thanks – I appreciate the input. Here is the info on the one I’m looking at. My other concern (as I had used the same unit as you do Neil) is the cost factor. I know a newer one will be easier on the wallet than what I had, but still – it cost quite a bit to run my older oil-warmed heater.

Michael – how large is your unit? How large of a space does it heat and cool?

-- I've never seen a tree that I wouldn't like to repurpose into a project. I love the smell of wood in the morning - it smells like victory.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

2499 posts in 2431 days


#7 posted 12-04-2010 02:37 AM

Billy – I think the radiant is ‘better’ just because when you are spraying you are going to be pulling out your heated air. The radiant heaters, since they are heating the object below rather than the air will behave better and stay warmer.

I use an electric heater, with blower, and there is no electic exposed element, the filaments are all enclosed so I don’t worry about there being a fire danger.
http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/1161
Dane did the review on this unit, they run 279 from Northern Tool, I’ve had mine ~4 years now

-- "If we did all the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astonish ourselves." Edison

View ShopDogs's profile

ShopDogs

228 posts in 2046 days


#8 posted 12-04-2010 02:51 AM

Billy, I will check the BTU/ tonage tomorrow. It has to heat and cool about 12,000 cubic feet. 1000sf with a 14’ crown and 11 .5’ side walls. The building is heavily insulated, but it is still a metal building.
It is not outrageously expensive to run for the 3 hot months, or the 3 cold months of the year.

Michael

-- ShopDogs, Tulsa, OK The tools aren't the problem-It's the organic interface!

View GaryL's profile

GaryL

1079 posts in 1520 days


#9 posted 12-04-2010 04:33 AM

IMHO I think 1000w is on the small side particularly with an exhaust vent in the finish room. Will you be drawing in filtered, heated air from the shop? What is the CFM of the exhaust vent? How well insulated and air sealed is the finish room? How many of the walls are exterior walls? Are there any windows? Lots of variables to determine the proper amount of BTUs needed. Michigan winters can be brutal at times. Just when you have a finishing project started the temps will drop below zero..lol.
If possible, go with a 220 unit. This will slow down the electric meter a bit.
Have you thought of a 220 electric baseboard unit? Then you don’t have to worry about airborne particles being blown into your finish.

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14872 posts in 2365 days


#10 posted 12-05-2010 08:03 AM

Your finishing are is most likely classed as a hazardous are where explosive liquids, fumes and vapors will be present under the national Electrical Code. As such, you cannot have any arc producing devices in that area that are not approved for the location; motors, switches, thermostats, ect..

Explosion proof wiring does not prevent an ignition, it merely contains it to prevent spread to the space and building structure.

The figure we used to use here in Western WA is 10 watts per sq foot for residential units. I would suppose that to be a little light in the continental areas.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View BTKS's profile

BTKS

1971 posts in 2153 days


#11 posted 12-05-2010 08:52 AM

BillyJ.
I’m in the same dilemma right now. I’m finishing out my finishing room and have decided to go with radiant baseboard heat. I’m starting with a 220V, 30in long unit that can be wired in series with any number I need. It only pulls approx. 2.1 amps. The unit was less than $40.00 and no forced air. As stated above, no blown dust! I’m putting up some serious cash in the insulation department though. Going with expanding foam on all walls and ceiling. I want dust and heat control from the shop space.
The radiant units are cheap and don’t use a fan. I’m placing mine directly under the window closest to the walkout door. If I need more, I’ll series wire one under the second window. Based on the room now 10 X 24 X 8 1/2 feet and the way it heats and cools, I think one will do fine. If I really get to moving a lot of vent air in the cold season, I’ll supplement with the woodstove from the shop or delay to a warmer day.
Hope this helps,
BTKS

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)

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TopamaxSurvivor

14872 posts in 2365 days


#12 posted 12-05-2010 11:20 AM

BKTS, Not sure if I understand what you are saying, but series wiring 2 baseboard will cut your heat down to near “0”! They need to be wired in parallel; ie, 220 to each, not tying them together end to end.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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