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Forum topic by nate22 posted 06-11-2017 02:39 AM 353 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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nate22

468 posts in 2539 days


06-11-2017 02:39 AM

My aunt and I are making signs and my question is should I polyurethane the signs that we are making for inside? I am going to poly the ones we make for outside. And if I should what kind should I use semi gloss, or gloss or what. I use semi gloss for my furniture but will it be alright for the signs? Any opinions will help. I will post pictures when some are finished.

-- Gracie's wooden signs. Middlebury, In.


9 replies so far

View RichTaylor's profile

RichTaylor

950 posts in 253 days


#1 posted 06-11-2017 03:21 AM

Not knowing exactly what the signs are made of, etc, but for something that will be indoors, pretty much any topcoat is good. If you like a satin finish, then poly or lacquer would be great.

For exterior signs, rather than plain poly, I think you’d be better off with a spar urethane. It is more flexible and UV resistant and should provide better protection against the elements, and is available in satin.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

18486 posts in 2769 days


#2 posted 06-11-2017 11:33 AM

Hi Nate. Either won will be good inside. It depends if they look better real shiny or more matted. you and your customers will be the judge of that.. but flat, satin, semi gloss or gloss all have a place inside.
Like Rich said, for outside you need the Poly with UV resistance. Helmsman makes a good spar urethane!!

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4440 posts in 2157 days


#3 posted 06-11-2017 01:49 PM

I guess I disagree with Helmsman being a good outdoor finish. Flexner once tested the UV resistance of several outdoor varnishes and concluded that because the Helmsman did so poorly, it had very little or no UV inhibitors. My suggestion would be to first of all skip anything that has urethane resin in it. They just don’t do well in the sun. That would then leave you with the true marine spars, such as Epifanes , which are extremely good. They do tend to be expensive, and need several coats. You could also consider some of the waterbornes, such as GF High Performance or Exterior 450. Lasyly, and my choice, would be paint….untinted EXTERIOR oil based paint. The mix base for dark colors (usually #4) without tint dries to look very much like oil based varnish and has a heavy dose of UV inhibitors. (more info here). Be aware, any clear coat used outdoors will need maintenance over time, so be ready to renew it one some basis.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

366 posts in 479 days


#4 posted 06-12-2017 02:15 AM

Fred is offering good advice. I have made outdoor furniture from white oak and cypress and I have CNC routed small signs from all sorts of wood. I don’t know of a clear finish product that will hold up outside for several years. Epifanes is the best I know of. I can say that Minwax “Helmsman” so called spar varnish didn’t even hold up for one year on two cypress Adirondack chairs. They were under a porch on the North side of my house shielded from rain and direct sun. They started cracking and peeling which led to a dark mildew forming forming around the damaged finish. It is worse than worthless because it is very hard to sand that ugly mess off the original wood.

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AlaskaGuy

2685 posts in 1972 days


#5 posted 06-12-2017 03:07 AM

Go over the the professional finishing forum on the woodweb site. Do a search on Helmsman and see what pops up. It not a very good product.

http://www.woodweb.com/cgi-bin/forums/finishing.pl

Here’s a direct link to one of the threads

http://www.woodweb.com/forum_fdse_files/finishing/794882.html

Listen to Fred>

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View r33tc0w's profile

r33tc0w

107 posts in 147 days


#6 posted 06-12-2017 03:28 AM

Automotive clear coat is what we use at our shop for exterior signs that are painted regardless of material. For wood, use shellac first then automotive clear

-- Matthew 13:53-58

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2685 posts in 1972 days


#7 posted 06-12-2017 04:00 AM



Automotive clear coat is what we use at our shop for exterior signs that are painted regardless of material. For wood, use shellac first then automotive clear

- r33tc0w


How much a gallon is that stuff a gallon?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

1413 posts in 563 days


#8 posted 06-12-2017 04:01 AM

The way I see it and I mean no offense, but they’re not heirloom signs that are being made.
I wouldn’t pay more for the finish than the sign costs.
How much are you selling the average sign for?

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View r33tc0w's profile

r33tc0w

107 posts in 147 days


#9 posted 06-12-2017 02:16 PM

For a sign, people expect it to last at least 5 years – just go to auto zone and grab a spray can. They have UV inhibitors which help it hold up outdoors

-- Matthew 13:53-58

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