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Forum topic by fo57 posted 06-10-2017 10:47 PM 725 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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fo57

5 posts in 256 days


06-10-2017 10:47 PM

Topic tags/keywords: oak air dried shrinkage

I’ve purchased some old air dried oak to use for a project. I have used oak from the same source in the past. All has been stacked for at least 8 years. My shop is not air conditioned. On previous projects, I made my drawer fronts etc overly tight. Then when the project is near completion, took it inside for a few weeks to allow things to shrink. Then made adjustments prior to finishing. The current project has more drawer fronts and other joinery that will be visible, so I am a bit more concerned about movement. Should I bring the lumber inside prior to milling?

-- Frank O.


9 replies so far

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JAAune

1769 posts in 2155 days


#1 posted 06-11-2017 07:33 PM

To be safe, it’s best to rough-cut the parts, leave them oversized and store them indoors for at least a couple days before milling to final dimension. I have a cheap moisture meter that I use to make sure the wood is below 10% before I get started.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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fo57

5 posts in 256 days


#2 posted 06-12-2017 10:31 PM

Thanks. I will bring the rough cut bits in for a few days. Need to get the moisture meter on my xmas list.

-- Frank O.

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pintodeluxe

5466 posts in 2651 days


#3 posted 06-12-2017 11:05 PM

I always kiln dry stacks of lumber I acquire. It solves the excessive initial moisture concerns, and kills any bugs that may be present. I have done it both ways, and I much prefer working with kiln dried lumber, especially if it was done in a low temperature dehumidification kiln.

Also, for what it’s worth, the cheap moisture meters are staggeringly inaccurate. I had one that would read +/- 5 percent when the probes were placed in the same holes for a second reading. I now use a couple of lignomat meters, an E/D for handheld use, and a MD/C for kiln readings.

Do it once, do it right.
Good luck with it.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1445 posts in 2905 days


#4 posted 06-12-2017 11:45 PM

As others have said, always bring it in prior to starting to mill, to reduce issues. If it is only air dried watch for powderpost signs. If you see dust on the ground or on some of the boards. It needs to be either heat treated or burned!

My rule is keep it in for a few weeks prior to touching it. Joint and skiff plane. Leave it for a week (if you can) stickered. Take it down a bit more and sticker and leave another week. If it does not move it will be ok.

I know thats a lot but with air dried, if you get impatient, you will feel the burn :) Cheers.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2316 posts in 1683 days


#5 posted 06-13-2017 11:36 AM



I always kiln dry stacks of lumber I acquire. It solves the excessive initial moisture concerns, and kills any bugs that may be present. I have done it both ways, and I much prefer working with kiln dried lumber, especially if it was done in a low temperature dehumidification kiln.

Also, for what it s worth, the cheap moisture meters are staggeringly inaccurate. I had one that would read +/- 5 percent when the probes were placed in the same holes for a second reading. I now use a couple of lignomat meters, an E/D for handheld use, and a MD/C for kiln readings.

Do it once, do it right.
Good luck with it.

- pintodeluxe


Pinto,

Do you have a kiln or do you take it to a kiln?

If you take it to a kiln could you give me an idea of the time and cost for 200 bf of white oak?

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

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pintodeluxe

5466 posts in 2651 days


#6 posted 06-13-2017 03:34 PM

Rob,
I have a small DH kiln, it’s in the June 2017 issue of Woodworker’s Journal if you want to check it out.
Time depends on how dry the wood is to start with, and the lumber thickness. Usually air dried 5/4 white oak will kiln dry in 3 weeks.

Cost considerations are linked in the article as well, but as far as having a commercial kiln dry a load for you… I’m not sure on the cost.

I will say white oak mills so much nicer when it’s been dried in a dehumidification kiln, compared to commercial steam kilns. The lumber doesn’t feel brittle and splintered like it can from retail suppliers.

Good luck with it.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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AlaskaGuy

3657 posts in 2147 days


#7 posted 06-13-2017 04:51 PM

I don’t know if this if valid be it seem to work.

I have a Wagner moisture meter (not a cheap one). I always have some differed species of wood in my shop and in my house. So I do a comparison check when in doubt. If I buy a new batch of oak I check with my MM and check some of the old oak in the shop and in the house. If they are all close I figure I’m good to go.

Since I don’t live in Arizona I’m not looking for the 6-*% MC, it will never happen in Alaska. I have successfully build many projects with that measures 10-12 % . 10-12 % is the Equilibrium Moisture Content I look for using my MM.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2316 posts in 1683 days


#8 posted 06-13-2017 09:13 PM



Rob,
I have a small DH kiln, it s in the June 2017 issue of Woodworker s Journal if you want to check it out.
Time depends on how dry the wood is to start with, and the lumber thickness. Usually air dried 5/4 white oak will kiln dry in 3 weeks.

Cost considerations are linked in the article as well, but as far as having a commercial kiln dry a load for you… I m not sure on the cost.

I will say white oak mills so much nicer when it s been dried in a dehumidification kiln, compared to commercial steam kilns. The lumber doesn t feel brittle and splintered like it can from retail suppliers.

Good luck with it.

- pintodeluxe


Thanks Pinto, I’m considering building one like this http://www.popularwoodworking.com/projects/solar-kiln. I’ll look for the one you mentioned.

How does a DH kiln help with killing bugs, does it get that hot? I thought it took 140 degrees for 24 hours to kill them.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

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pintodeluxe

5466 posts in 2651 days


#9 posted 06-14-2017 02:47 AM

Yes, with the right heater it will get that hot.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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