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Planer checking alot

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Forum topic by newbiewoodworker posted 12-02-2010 02:24 AM 1125 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2293 days


12-02-2010 02:24 AM

I started to notice that my planer is beginning to check alot… I removed a large thing of gunk that was caught in the blade, some kinda glue residue(I always knew there was a reason Home Depot lumber smells of glue…) I got a good portion of it, althought he rest will have to wait till I can get the darned knives out… Since a couple of the screws are stripped to hell.

Also, something I never had happen before, a piece of wood started to kick back. It could be seen, where the knives dropped, and gouged the wood, in a massive spot.. It scared me to death…lol…

I checked, and it seems everything feeds well… well enough to knock my bottle of soda, which was sitting on the end of the bench, off, proceeding to have its cap crack open, spraying my shop floor with Rootbear…lol.. opps…

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."


21 replies so far

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wseand

2754 posts in 2508 days


#1 posted 12-02-2010 02:44 AM

Sounds like a normal day to me. LOL. Those damn planers can be deadly and can waste a good soda or coffee. Sounds like you didn’t lose any digits or worse, make sure you keep your maintanance up.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2293 days


#2 posted 12-02-2010 03:13 AM

Lol, they are a pita… and to think…our shop teacher at school didnt make us show him how to use it(ie: performance test/practical test).... But I have gotten into more sticker situations with that thing, than I have any other tool I have operated… mine binds occasionally… thats always scary…lol..

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."

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wseand

2754 posts in 2508 days


#3 posted 12-02-2010 03:23 AM

I am waiting for a knife to come flying out and give me a close shave just not to close. LOL. I don’t have a dust collection and I went to get a piece just planed and stuck my face to close. It felt 60 grit across the face, talk about a close shave.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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childress

841 posts in 3008 days


#4 posted 12-02-2010 07:07 AM

I’m sorry, but what is planer check? Never heard of that. As for the gunk, do you think it could be resin in the wood you use? quite a few softwoods have resin canals that ooze pitch. That stuff can gum up blades very easily.

To my knowledge, there is no “glue” in their lumber unless you buy the laminated boards….or some plywood.

Also, make sure your table on the planer is waxed. It will help the wood slide through better…

-- Childress Woodworks

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newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2293 days


#5 posted 12-03-2010 12:15 AM

chippout… sorry, after an hour of listening to our shop teacher call it checking(jointer and planer safety was the week’s lesson) checking, I seem to have repeated it…

It probably is pitch… yuck.. I couldnt even remove it with a razor knife…

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."

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childress

841 posts in 3008 days


#6 posted 12-03-2010 12:27 AM

Okay…

for the pitch, try a rag soaked with acetone. If it’s too hard, then try a heat gun first then clean with the rag

As for the chip out, while sharp knives can help this, the main problem is dust extraction. If you can’t remove the wood fast enough out of the planer, it will cause chip out.

-- Childress Woodworks

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rwyoung

388 posts in 2938 days


#7 posted 12-03-2010 12:30 AM

Planers like a tablesaw will throw pieces back. The “blast zone” is directly behind the machine. Just stand off to one side, preferably the one with the power switch.

Jointers can also throw a piece backwards if you aren’t careful. This is why you should run your hands over the blade as you feed material. If the material were to suddenly vanish, guess where your hand would go. You would never find all the pieces to stitch back together.

-- Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things.

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wseand

2754 posts in 2508 days


#8 posted 12-03-2010 12:43 AM

You can throw some oven cleaner on them for about 5 mins to get the resin off. Checking, chucking, chipping, its all bad.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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ChuckV

2880 posts in 2993 days


#9 posted 12-03-2010 12:56 AM

rwyoung

I think that you meant to say, “This is why you should not run your hands over the blade as you feed material.”

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

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Gregn

1642 posts in 2449 days


#10 posted 12-03-2010 01:06 AM

Are you using Southern Yellow Pine by chance? It is known for large amounts of pitch and can really gum up machines. Also sometimes the grain orientation in Yellow Pine will cause chip out during planing. Another question would also be is your depth of cut heavy or light? I find the lighter the cut the less chip out tends to be.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2293 days


#11 posted 12-03-2010 01:12 AM

Mine doesnt have an ajustable depth of cut… I ususally go down until I cant stick the board in(hits the throat) then up a notch…

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 2534 days


#12 posted 12-03-2010 01:33 AM

Try going up 2-3 “notches”, then coming back down just enough to get some cutting action. I get my best results when I make multiple shallow passes (~1/32, or so) instead of trying to hog everything in one pass.

That “dropping knives” business sounds like snipe. Do you just get it within 2”-3” of the end of your board?
It’s usually caused by the board dropping slightly as it clears the first feed roller and finishes the cut with only the second roller moving the board. You can reduce (or eliminate) snipe by using outfeed support that’s dead parallel with the planer table.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

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newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2293 days


#13 posted 12-03-2010 01:34 AM

But it did it at the beginning(I was butt running)... I mean it was like no snipe Ihave ever seen…lol…

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."

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Gregn

1642 posts in 2449 days


#14 posted 12-03-2010 01:36 AM

Try setting the board in part way and lowering the cutter head till it just barely touches. Then pull the board out and lower the cutter head a 1/32” for cut. It sounds like you are lowering the cutting head to take to deep a cut.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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Gregn

1642 posts in 2449 days


#15 posted 12-03-2010 01:46 AM

What planer do you have?

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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