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Handrail. Durable finish. Oil Based Polyurethane?

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Forum topic by Fax posted 06-08-2017 04:00 PM 465 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Fax

62 posts in 296 days


06-08-2017 04:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question oak finishing

Hello friends.
Would oil based polyurethane be a good durable finish for handrail ?
I have a can of ZAR Oil Polyurethane
Thank you very much for your help !
Julian

-- Julian Paul Jones


10 replies so far

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

963 posts in 2656 days


#1 posted 06-08-2017 04:08 PM

Yes, as long as it’s inside.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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Fax

62 posts in 296 days


#2 posted 06-08-2017 04:50 PM



Yes, as long as it s inside.

- jdh122

Hi Jeremy
Thank you very much for your help!

-- Julian Paul Jones

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

609 posts in 2187 days


#3 posted 06-08-2017 05:08 PM

I used poly urethane on my handrails. Apply several thin coats and lightly sand between coats and you will have a finish that should last for a very long time.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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Fax

62 posts in 296 days


#4 posted 06-08-2017 05:21 PM


I used poly urethane on my handrails. Apply several thin coats and lightly sand between coats and you will have a finish that should last for a very long time.

- EarlS

Hi Earl,
Thank you very much for your help!
I will definitely go for the Oil Based Polyurethane then.
This is so helpful because someone said not to use polyurethane on handrail because the oils from the hands will gum up the finish.
I wonder if that is the problem with Water Based Polyurethane on handrails. I don’t know .

-- Julian Paul Jones

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EarlS

609 posts in 2187 days


#5 posted 06-08-2017 05:27 PM

Oil or water based poly should work. Make sure to let things dry before applying the next coat. Too many times bad finishes can be traced back to being impatient and not waiting for things to dry. Other culprits include not putting on enough coats or thinking that a couple of thick coats is the same as several thinner coats.

I’m guilty as charged with impatience, especially with Watco Danish oil. Having to sand the project back to bare wood and start over is punishment enough to remember that waiting is still faster than re-finishing.

Thick coats wind up with runs, drips, and sags, all of which mean you get to sand off the finish and start over as well.

Not enough coats means the wood isn’t fully sealed and protected so oil or water can get under the finish and cause problems like tackiness.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3207 days


#6 posted 06-08-2017 05:35 PM

I have to recommend a water based poly, at least for the final coats. Warmer weather and oils from hands will affect an oil finish over time. Water based for all of it if you want crystal clear finish, oil based will darken the wood some and pop any grain in the wood. If you use the oil based just follow with the last 2 coats in water based for a clean hard finish that will hold up to anything.

View Fax's profile

Fax

62 posts in 296 days


#7 posted 06-08-2017 05:35 PM



Oil or water based poly should work. Make sure to let things dry before applying the next coat. Too many times bad finishes can be traced back to being impatient and not waiting for things to dry. Other culprits include not putting on enough coats or thinking that a couple of thick coats is the same as several thinner coats.

I m guilty as charged with impatience, especially with Watco Danish oil. Having to sand the project back to bare wood and start over is punishment enough to remember that waiting is still faster than re-finishing.

Thick coats wind up with runs, drips, and sags, all of which mean you get to sand off the finish and start over as well.

Not enough coats means the wood isn t fully sealed and protected so oil or water can get under the finish and cause problems like tackiness.

- EarlS

Thank you very much Earl !
This so good to know.
I am very grateful for this.

-- Julian Paul Jones

View Fax's profile

Fax

62 posts in 296 days


#8 posted 06-08-2017 05:41 PM



I have to recommend a water based poly, at least for the final coats. Warmer weather and oils from hands will affect an oil finish over time. Water based for all of it if you want crystal clear finish, oil based will darken the wood some and pop any grain in the wood. If you use the oil based just follow with the last 2 coats in water based for a clean hard finish that will hold up to anything.

- papadan

Hi
Thank you very much!
Wow, so the water based polyurethane on handrail is a very durable finish.
I had bo idea what to use.
I am very grateful for your help!

-- Julian Paul Jones

View Jeff in Huntersville's profile

Jeff in Huntersville

410 posts in 3033 days


#9 posted 06-08-2017 06:03 PM

About 10 years ago I redid our stairs (treads, risers and all railings) in red oak. I used Minwax stain then two coats of water based polyurethane in satin finish. Though two kids and many sweaty summers it’s held up.

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Fax

62 posts in 296 days


#10 posted 06-08-2017 06:18 PM



About 10 years ago I redid our stairs (treads, risers and all railings) in red oak. I used Minwax stain then two coats of water based polyurethane in satin finish. Though two kids and many sweaty summers it s held up.

- Jeff in Huntersville

Hi Jeff,
I am so glad to hear all these things.
In the past I regretted it big time for not asking experienced people about wood finishing.
I am definitely gonna do the water based polyurethane especially for the fact that they dry fast and don’t smell bad.
Thank you so much!
Julian

-- Julian Paul Jones

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