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Does this look like proper assembly?

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Forum topic by oldnovice posted 06-08-2017 05:32 AM 1374 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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oldnovice

6433 posts in 3207 days


06-08-2017 05:32 AM

Topic tags/keywords: joining lumber rustic

I was “rummaging” around the Web and ran across this build of a cabinet and out of curiosity I watched it.

DIY Rustic Bathroom Vanity

I started getting concerned about the solid panels screwed to cross grain stiles on the doors and the solid wood sides again screwed to the cross members of the frame.

Just wondering if this looks wrong to anyone else?

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"


13 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3661 posts in 2148 days


#1 posted 06-08-2017 05:51 AM

@ the 5:40 mark he say he drill the corner screws holes larger to accommodate wood movement.

I will say that’s not how I’d do it.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10640 posts in 2219 days


#2 posted 06-08-2017 05:55 AM

I watched this the other day. It’s basically Anna White level of woodworking. He did mention elongating screw holes to allow movement.

(rant deleted)

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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AlaskaGuy

3661 posts in 2148 days


#3 posted 06-08-2017 06:03 AM

He’s trying to sell a product so I expect the main focus is to make it all look simple and easy to do.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

4533 posts in 2043 days


#4 posted 06-08-2017 06:57 AM

Here is my view on the project.

The builder certainly has the gear and skills to do the job.
Both in the build and finishing aspects.

So to answer the specific question oldnovice asked …Personally I think the doors are overkill in respect to the material fabrication (meaning they do not need to be that thickness) but that doesnt make it wrong or unsafe.

As for attaching the panels with just screws is a bit of an odd process especially after seeing the rest of the M&T work. but what the heck they do look good finished.

I am not sure where the back panels went to in the final product but again temporary fixing them is a smart move if the plumbing locations are unknown before the job is completed.

-- Regards Robert

View edapp's profile

edapp

61 posts in 1269 days


#5 posted 06-08-2017 12:24 PM

Yea I watch most of this guys videos and this one struck me as odd. The solid panels look odd from the outside (recessed too far) and awful from the inside (i might have made the panel the full height and width of the interior if i felt compelled to set the panels inside the cabinet, and at least predrilled the screws to sit within the panel).

The panel issue really bugged me on the wheelchair compliant cabinet where he built the frame/panel this way for a side of the cabinet that was flush against a wall, and all you will ever see is the ugly interior (no doors on this one) panel. Also seeing the visible pocket holes on the legs, when putting them on the back of the leg (against the wall) would make them permanently hidden.

Also the rail/stile configuration of the doors are backwards. All in all these would have looked a lot cleaner and been less work/material if i built them as a true built in. A lot of wasted material here, and as you can see in the install due to the floor not being level some legs do not reach the ground.

To me this was not a project that suited a video very well. Should have done some quick simple built-ins and skipped the videoing process all together. Makes me think i shouldn’t be watching his other videos for fear picking up bad habits/bad ideas.

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a1Jim

116591 posts in 3416 days


#6 posted 06-08-2017 01:28 PM

I agree with the Ana White skill level comment besides the strange approach to the panel doors and to the whole build there’s absolutely no reason for all of those dominos in the panels. Why use solid wood on parts that there is no need for solid wood and pocket screw in a ply floor in. This fine fellow has a big investment in tools and shop but needs to invest some of his funds into a cabinet making class.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2716 posts in 1320 days


#7 posted 06-08-2017 01:48 PM

It didn’t watch the video but someone mentioned wood movement.

I’ve been watching some furniture restoration videos and see lots of antique furniture built with absolutely no regard for wood movement. For example, drawer runners glued and nailed across grain to the side panel, which is generally one piece of wood. Not as many cracks or cupping as one would expect.

Philip Lowe has a video on FWW building a highboy where to my great surprise he attaches a one piece 30” wide walnut top by pegging all 4 corners right thru the panel. He did this to simulate the methods used 200 years ago.

Guess all I’m saying is yes, build furniture “properly”, but I wonder if we worry too much about wood movement?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View edapp's profile

edapp

61 posts in 1269 days


#8 posted 06-08-2017 03:18 PM

a1Jim – If I could “like” your comment I would. Well said.

What is interesting is some of his build videos are quite good, but he comments on youtube after this one that it is his first time making a panel door. Not sure how he got this far into the hobby without ironing out some of the simpler techniques. For instance, how is what he did with these panels any easier than putting them in a groove? There is no doubt it detracts from the look of the project, but i would argue it also didn’t save him any time.

View gargey's profile

gargey

862 posts in 615 days


#9 posted 06-08-2017 03:29 PM

Put simply, those are not good construction methods. Despite a clearly huge investment in time and equipment.

I’m sure he turns out stuff 1000 times fast than I do, though. ($)

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

4533 posts in 2043 days


#10 posted 06-09-2017 03:31 AM

After reading the above coments and taking a second view of the video I stand corrected on the Wrong or unsafe, yes the Door construction is incorrect WRT the rails and stiles they are wrong. (Ack edapp) hence this now now puts in doubt his skill level. (ACK garey)

So no it does not look like proper asembly.

I guess all the fancy tools blinded me!!

I should send him my Cabinetry and Joinery Basic books by Sam Allen published in 1992 (ACK A1Jim)

-- Regards Robert

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10640 posts in 2219 days


#11 posted 06-09-2017 04:14 AM

I think before you attempt to teach others, you should bother to learn it yourself and maybe practice.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6433 posts in 3207 days


#12 posted 06-09-2017 04:41 AM

I agree Rick and there are enough resources to learn the proper way.
But, unfortunately way too many bad examples!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Loren's profile

Loren

9633 posts in 3487 days


#13 posted 06-09-2017 04:43 AM

Unorthodox but he does basically get around
the question of using a planer and a router.

There’s no discussion of dimensioning the
frame lumber to be free of twist. While I suppose
you could get lucky with dimensioned 4/4
boards, I wouldn’t say the chances are good
and it’s likely the door frames would come
out not-flat.

Sometimes a raised panel is flipped around
so the front has a recessed flat panel appearance
and the back protrudes past the frame. I think
the Shakers made some doors this way.

Anyway.

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