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Forum topic by TopamaxSurvivor posted 11-30-2010 04:25 AM 6607 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


11-30-2010 04:25 AM

Topic tags/keywords: dunlap plane user

Hello plane people, Are Dunlap planes good users?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence


9 replies so far

View Bureaucrat's profile

Bureaucrat

18337 posts in 3117 days


#1 posted 11-30-2010 04:53 AM

I have a Dunlap #5 that I use regularly. Aside from an emotional attachment to it because it belonged to my father in law, it just works great for me. I am considering a new plane iron for it. I don’t know what my FIL did but I had to do some serious straightening to it.
These were Sears less expensive line so some work may be required to get them to work as you’d like.

-- Gary D. Stoughton, WI

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#2 posted 11-30-2010 05:45 AM

Thanks for the info. They are not an equivalent to Stanley, then ;-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View swirt's profile

swirt

2118 posts in 2437 days


#3 posted 11-30-2010 05:52 AM

I’ve handled a few while at estate sales and such. They seem to be fairly solid. I haven’t ever used one, but for the low prices they usually fetch I’d say it is worth a try. If it is in good condition, I think they are much better than anything you can get new for under $50 today.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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Loren

8309 posts in 3113 days


#4 posted 12-01-2010 10:09 PM

They’re as good as a lot of others. Performance is determined more
by what you do with your blades and set up the plane than by
the brand. For finish-planing, sharpness and mass help build up
heat in the wood fibers as well are reduce chatter. When the
wood fibers are compressed, heated and sliced at the same time,
a superior finished surface emerges. A finish plane stroke should be
a fast and as firm-pressed to the surface as you can manage. That’s
why it’s best to use a low bench for planing – it puts your weight
on the plane as well as allowing you to have a wide-legged stance
to lower your center of gravity, which helps in getting a long,
continuous, fast, pressured stroke.

Watch out for the stamped-steel frogs. Those suck. Look for cast
and machined frogs on planes and look at the mouth of the plane,
which cannot easily be fixed. Look for cracks in the castings too.

View newplane's profile

newplane

159 posts in 3543 days


#5 posted 12-01-2010 10:47 PM

I have a Dunlap set, of (2) #3’s, #4, and a #5 (Stanley size equivalent) I have a full set of Stanley’s 3,4,4.5,5.25,6, and #7, I also have quite a few Veritas hand-planes. Once I tuned up the Dunlap’s and installed a hock blade (not completely necessary to swap blade if the original is good) they perform just as good as any other plane that I have. Even the brand new expensive ones. Just make sure the throat is square and not chipped or cracked, the frog sets well to the bed of the plane, the chip-breaker mates well with the blade with proper set then slowly adjust the blade until it takes whisper shavings. In my book two or three shavings are way easier than one hard shaving. Good luck and God bless.

-- Dont just dream it, get up and live it!

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#6 posted 12-02-2010 02:47 AM

Thanks for the info. Sounds like planing in a cold garage is not a good idea. What about artifical heat to warm the wood?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Loren's profile

Loren

8309 posts in 3113 days


#7 posted 12-02-2010 08:04 AM

The heat is a friction thing. Surface friction and pressure helps get a
cleaner planed surface. This does warm the surface of the board
and heat the iron a bit, but perhaps I overstated the affect of
heat in planing. Try experimenting with fast stroke, minimal cut depth,
a tight plane mouth, a waxed sole, and pressure on the work You’ll
see that with a nice board, you’ll get a polished surface right from
the plane.

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Dan

3630 posts in 2345 days


#8 posted 12-02-2010 08:44 AM

I have not used a Dunlap plane but I bought an old plane somewhere that had a Dunlap blade in it. After flattening the blade and sharpening it I find it to cut very well.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#9 posted 12-02-2010 10:07 AM

Loren, having never done much with planes, I have no prespective or experince to access yoi commnets. Carry on please! :-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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