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How do I perform this step illustrated in FWW?

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Forum topic by leftcoaster posted 06-06-2017 02:16 PM 894 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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leftcoaster

189 posts in 715 days


06-06-2017 02:16 PM

I’m looking at a Fine Woodworking plan for wooden full extension drawer slides and one of the steps is confusing to me.

In step 1, we cut a full length rabbet.

In step 2(a), we cross cut at two points on the rabbet

In step 2(b), we remove the material between the two cross cuts. This is the right most picture in the attached image, where the caption says “Using stop blocks make a rip cut along the rabbet to remove the center portion [between the two cross cuts]. Be sure to stop short of the notches. Finish the rip using a hand saw.

Is this accomplished with a plunge cut on the table saw? I don’t know how to do that safely. Is there a reason one wouldn’t just use a dado stack? I’d try a band saw but don’t think I could get the rip straight enough. I’ve used the router table to make plunge cuts for mortises, but not in anything this thin and not with the bit coming through the stock. Can I push the piece into a router bit from the side and then advance it forward to a stop block?

I’d be glad to know how others would approach this, safely.


14 replies so far

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leftcoaster

189 posts in 715 days


#1 posted 06-06-2017 02:20 PM

Another idea—start with the blade below the table and the stock held down with either a push stick or a feather board and raise the blade through it.

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mrg

786 posts in 2838 days


#2 posted 06-06-2017 02:29 PM

Do you have the issue of FWW after the one with the plans your working with? It may have an update at the back or in the readers comments about doing this in a different and safer way.

-- mrg

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jmartel

7531 posts in 1989 days


#3 posted 06-06-2017 02:31 PM

I certainly would not do that as described.

Get a flat top blade or a dado cut and nibble away at the middle crosscutting it. Use a sacrifical backer to stop blowout on the back end.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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leftcoaster

189 posts in 715 days


#4 posted 06-06-2017 02:43 PM

I do not have the following issue, but good idea to look.

@jmartel, thanks—the dado approach is the only one that I didn’t find… unnerving and most likely to be unfingering.

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jmartel

7531 posts in 1989 days


#5 posted 06-06-2017 03:09 PM

The dado would be safe enough. Dropping the piece with a plunge cut onto a tablesaw blade would not.

You could also use a router with a flat bottom bit once you cut the shoulders.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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bonesbr549

1445 posts in 2906 days


#6 posted 06-06-2017 03:16 PM

Thats a hard way to get that cut. Id use a router and a chisel to square the corner.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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bbasiaga

1011 posts in 1834 days


#7 posted 06-06-2017 04:03 PM

Or bust out a jigsaw.

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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splintergroup

1702 posts in 1061 days


#8 posted 06-06-2017 04:36 PM

I do that type of cut regularly. Typically I’ll cut away the waste with a bandsaw and then do as illustrated in the photo, except I use the router table.

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pintodeluxe

5466 posts in 2652 days


#9 posted 06-06-2017 04:54 PM

Router and template guide. It would be wise to keep more distance between the saw blade and your fingers than that illustration 2b shows.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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leftcoaster

189 posts in 715 days


#10 posted 06-06-2017 05:30 PM

Yes, I’ve actually seen quite a few pictures and videos from FWW that have had me scratching my head re: safety. There was one video on safety recently where the fence had obviously been involved in a blade contact that was worrisome. I know—easy to criticize—but it would be nice to have better examples for us newbies to learn from.

I appreciate all of the helpful suggestions here.

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Loren

9633 posts in 3486 days


#11 posted 06-06-2017 07:01 PM

I wouldn’t want to do that cut the way shown
but there is a way to do it that I think will make
it as safe as possible.

Set it up with the stops as shown and raise the
blade only a little more than half the thickness
of the material. Cut one side, then the other.
There will be sufficient scoring at the ends
of the cuts to guide a hand saw.

Personally I would prefer to band saw it. If
you band saw won’t cut straight it is probably
because the blade is quite dull or the guides
are not set close enough to the sides of the
blade (paper width on each side). Making
straight cuts on the band saw is one of its
great uses and worth going to the trouble of
getting the saw tuned to cut straight. The
cut can be cleaned up after on a router table
with a straight bit and fence, or if only a few
parts are needed with a coarse file.

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Loren

9633 posts in 3486 days


#12 posted 06-06-2017 07:04 PM

Still another way to make the parts is to simply
mill some stock, cut and glue it up the way
you want. Little hand hammered brad nails
with the heads clipped off can be put in to
act as little alignment dowels so the little parts
glue on without swimming around when clamped.

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Sark

28 posts in 199 days


#13 posted 06-14-2017 11:54 PM

I like Loren’s idea. Unless there is some good reason to mill this out of a single piece of wood, why not just make it out of a couple of pieces of wood?

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builtinbkyn

1924 posts in 779 days


#14 posted 06-15-2017 12:35 AM

Why not just use the miter gauge with a sacrificial board and a dado set? A few passes and it’s clear. Seems simple enough and no risk to the digits.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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