LumberJocks

I have a dilemma

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by doninvegas posted 11-30-2010 03:28 AM 1236 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View doninvegas's profile

doninvegas

334 posts in 2373 days


11-30-2010 03:28 AM

I’m making my first end grain cutting board for my wife and I have gotten to the point that I’m ready to cut the board down to expose the end grain and do the second glue up. I need to square up the ends (sides) of the board. Normally I would use my table saw but this thing is 16” long so it’s too long to do it with the table saw. So, how do I square up the long sides? I drew a line down the lenth and cut it on my band saw but even though I’m close it’s not square. I thought about running it across my jointer but its end grain and I don’t think it’s too safe. What do I do short of getting out the circuital saw and a straight edge?

-- "Courage is being scared to death -- but saddling up anyway."


9 replies so far

View childress's profile

childress

841 posts in 3007 days


#1 posted 11-30-2010 03:41 AM

You need a sled for the table saw and then only need to square one end. After you’ve sliced all the pieces, the last piece will be left over and most likely trash…

Here's a pic of my sled that Patron took when he came for a visit. It’s a couple of pics down…

-- Childress Woodworks

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2540 days


#2 posted 11-30-2010 05:18 AM

I advise you not to be too quick to dismiss the straight edge and a circular saw idea. I’ve used this approach on several important cuts that I could not handle on another saw in my shop.

In the interest of full disclosure, I now often use a festool plunge saw and a festool track (which is great) but earlier I used a normal straight edge and conventional circular saw with acceptable results.

Don’t set the depth of the circular saw any deeper than necessary. In my experience, a cordless (DeWalt) circular saw goes slower (much slower) but it seems to give a smoother, cleaner cut and I really like having the blade on the left side of the saw. Whatever you do, a sharp blade is essential.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

763 posts in 2322 days


#3 posted 11-30-2010 05:57 AM

I just came up from the shop about an hour ago working on some end grain boards myself. I use my table saw with a Freud combo blade (glass smooth cuts). I set the fence at the desired width and used my Incra miter with a straight jointed/planed board screwed to it coming to within 1/4 inch of the blade at a 90 degree angle. Push the cutting board through using a push stick on the side between the fence and blade.

I usually like to have the off feed to the left of the blade but this method worked fine as long as the saw is tuned and the fence is setup correctly. Use a scrap piece of wood to supply mild pressure to the left of the board as you get closer to the blade to keep your hands away. Follow through completely and pull the glue up away from the blade when you pull back for the next cut.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 2475 days


#4 posted 11-30-2010 09:03 AM

A straightedge and flushtrim bit on your router will work. It’s a great cleanup method after using the circ or jigsaw to get close.

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3187 posts in 2242 days


#5 posted 11-30-2010 04:39 PM

Keep your cuts a little on the thick side. When you glue up the next direction, glued joints can move. If the thickness is a little long, the finished product, when smoothed down, will be right. It is better to have a chopping block too thick than too thin. —Just a thought

-- David in Damascus, MD

View doninvegas's profile

doninvegas

334 posts in 2373 days


#6 posted 11-30-2010 09:28 PM

Hey bentlyj, are you in Vegas? I’d love to come by your shop some time if nothing else just to say howdy.

-- "Courage is being scared to death -- but saddling up anyway."

View doninvegas's profile

doninvegas

334 posts in 2373 days


#7 posted 12-02-2010 03:00 AM

OK, I used a straight edge and a circular saw. I got it square and then I sliced it with my band saw.
Re-gluded, sanded it flat with my drum sander today and then I rounded over the edges, made finger holes and started the finishing process. I’m using Watco butcher block oil. Once it’s done I’ll post pics.
Thanks to all who responded with tips I appreciate it. I now know why these things sell for $85 to $100. They are a pain to make. This first one isn’t sellable but my wife will love it. I learned a lot. What to do and what not to do. That’s why I love working the wood. I learn new things all the time.

-- "Courage is being scared to death -- but saddling up anyway."

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3187 posts in 2242 days


#8 posted 12-02-2010 04:02 PM

Someone once told me that the first 3 or 4 of anything are just to tell you what you are doing wrong. Once you have it figured out, try making 3 or more – exactly the same. That is where the challenge begins.

Someone else once told me that when you make something with a drawer in it, make the drawer first, make everything else to fit the drawer. He told me he would never make the drawer last and that it is impossible to hand make a drawer to fit a predetermined hole. I hope he never does a kitchen or chest of drawers.

There is always something to keep you challenged and thinking – if you allow it. Good job!

-- David in Damascus, MD

View doninvegas's profile

doninvegas

334 posts in 2373 days


#9 posted 12-04-2010 08:23 PM

Well, it’s done. Like I said it’s not perfect but my wife loves it.

-- "Courage is being scared to death -- but saddling up anyway."

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com