LumberJocks

Built-In Entertainment center over carpet?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by bndawgs posted 06-05-2017 09:11 PM 1235 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View bndawgs's profile

bndawgs

63 posts in 422 days


06-05-2017 09:11 PM

I have an area in my basement that I am interested in building an entertainment center for. It’s currently carpeted with baseboard molding. I’m assuming I should removed the baseboard molding, but could i get away with leaving the carpet? I don’t necessarily want to cut the carpet and fool with re-tacking it in front of the center.

The bump-in, is is the space I’m working with

And I was thinking of doing something similar to this

Looking for any feedback or suggestions as well. Thanks


19 replies so far

View them700project's profile

them700project

115 posts in 858 days


#1 posted 06-05-2017 09:16 PM

If you leave it and the basement flows you will have some mold issues.

What you could do and this may be crazy but you could float the whole thing 3” and cover with base molding. If water ever became an issue you could pull base molding replace carpet and put base back. this would also prevent damage to cabinets. though the sheetrock itself would still get wet.

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

1861 posts in 739 days


#2 posted 06-05-2017 09:18 PM

You can do it, I’ve done it more than once.
One of the problems you will see over time is that the unit will settle and the crown will pull away from the ceiling.

I think you would be better served to cut it though,
even if you have to find a carpet guy to tack it back down for you. It shouldn’t cost much.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View Ted78's profile

Ted78

325 posts in 1840 days


#3 posted 06-05-2017 09:33 PM

Being in a basement, I’d be concerned with flooding also, either from rain or just a broken pipe or something. If you ever need to pull the carpet up to dry things out you don’t want it permanently stuck under there.

-- Ted

View bndawgs's profile

bndawgs

63 posts in 422 days


#4 posted 06-05-2017 09:34 PM



You can do it, I ve done it more than once.
One of the problems you will see over time is that the unit will settle and the crown will pull away from the ceiling.

I think you would be better served to cut it though,
even if you have to find a carpet guy to tack it back down for you. It shouldn t cost much.

- jbay

I’ve read about the sinking issue while building on carpet. But if I anchor it to the back wall in some fashion, wouldn’t that help avoid the sinking?

My original thought was to build a 2×4 base and then basically build 4 boxes for the bottom, sides, and top.

I’m just thinking in terms of returning the space to how it is in the future for any reason.

View bndawgs's profile

bndawgs

63 posts in 422 days


#5 posted 06-05-2017 09:37 PM

In the event of a flood, I would assume the lower portion would be ruined and have to be removed anyways right?

Thanks for the feedback so far, I didn’t even think about potential flooding issues.

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

1861 posts in 739 days


#6 posted 06-05-2017 09:41 PM


I ve read about the sinking issue while building on carpet. But if I anchor it to the back wall in some fashion, wouldn t that help avoid the sinking?

- bndawgs

Anchor it all you want, It will still settle. JMO
You can always just re-caulk when it does if your set on doing it.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1275 posts in 760 days


#7 posted 06-06-2017 02:20 AM

bndawgs,

I assume that you plan to build this project as four separate components; identical twin towers connected by the bridge built as the third unit, and the base as the fourth unit. The twin towers would attach to the wall and bridge would attach to the wall and to the twin towers.

I would think that if the base were built with a height that is about 4” short of the distance from the floor to the bottom of the twin tower cabinets and cabinet levelers installed on the base cabinet, the carpet and base boards could be left in place, a measure of flood protection achieved, and carpet tack strip problems avoided. Additionally, if the base cabinet is attached to the wall, the leg levelers would probably bear less weight and reduce the carpet crushing tendency of the full weight of a base cabinet. Some toe kick clips could be attached to the toe kick board and it would then snap into place on the cabinet leveler legs.

Here is a link to the cabinet leg levelers that come to mind.

https://www.richelieu.com/us/en/category/furniture-equipment/cabinet-levelers/451-series-abs-levelers/abs-levelers-with-head-20-mm-5-mm-adjustment/1015873

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3662 posts in 2149 days


#8 posted 06-06-2017 04:45 AM

You beat me.

You could set the unit on euro legs. If it floods you can pop the toe kick off and use a fan to dry it out.

That being said removal is probably best. I’ve done it both ways.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View bndawgs's profile

bndawgs

63 posts in 422 days


#9 posted 06-06-2017 08:26 PM

thanks guys for the help and suggestions so far. i have a lot more to think about now, which is good.

i also need to get started on some measurements and designs.

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3208 days


#10 posted 06-06-2017 08:53 PM

Remove the carpet and build it right. Move the tack strip from the back wall out to the new edge and you’re done.

View gargey's profile

gargey

862 posts in 615 days


#11 posted 06-06-2017 08:56 PM

Tear down house, build on pylons above ground level, then should be fine to have something on carpet.

View bndawgs's profile

bndawgs

63 posts in 422 days


#12 posted 06-06-2017 08:57 PM

thanks guys for the help and suggestions so far. i have a lot more to think about now, which is good.

i also need to get started on some measurements and designs.


Tear down house, build on pylons above ground level, then should be fine to have something on carpet.

- gargey


lol, that reminds me of that homes by holmes show. where the people would have a small spot of mold in the closet and he’d have to tear off the roof, the front of the house and re-pave the driveway to prevent it from happening again.

View MrStyle's profile

MrStyle

82 posts in 1570 days


#13 posted 06-11-2017 02:08 AM

cut the carpet back, build a platform for the cabinets – which will allow you to create a perfectly flat and level surface – which will save you so much time over trying to level on carpet !

Write down the idea of building on carpet on a piece of paper – and then burn it in sacrifice to the “hey this out to save me some hassle idea bucket !”

View bndawgs's profile

bndawgs

63 posts in 422 days


#14 posted 06-28-2017 06:43 PM

So after taking some measurements, I had a couple questions. They’re probably silly ones, but I don’t have much experience building large furniture. Originally, I wanted to just use a full sheet of plywood cut to width for the top and bottom of the bottom cabinet and then add in vertical pieces for dividers. However the opening is actually 106” wide. I could just break the bottom piece up into 3 separate cabinets, but I wanted to have a solid surface showing for the top piece. I didn’t necessarily want to order any custom wood pieces as I was hoping to just get everything from HD or Lowes. So my other thought was to have the side pieces go from floor to ceiling, which would take care of the width issue, but then the design would have to be modified and I feel that it would look funny.

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

341 posts in 799 days


#15 posted 06-29-2017 12:09 AM

Don’t cut the carpet back. Permanent today and want to move it out 5 years from now. Mine was wall to wall and I took it out years ago because I wanted to move the room around from time to time. Thankfully the carpet was still in…

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com