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My shop has mildew -help

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Forum topic by BamaCummins posted 06-04-2017 01:42 PM 1176 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BamaCummins

67 posts in 3411 days


06-04-2017 01:42 PM

Topic tags/keywords: ventilation humidity

I built a shop, 24×24, on a concrete slab, fully insulated, with metal on the outside and roof. I don’t use all the time, so in the summer sees little use. I use a electric space heater in the winter time.

I guess the summer heat, with no ventilation going, I must be setting up humidity off and on, some tools have rusted and see mold buildup and smell. What is the best way for me to control this, get the right ventilation to prevent? Thought about ventilating with a fan to the outside, but maybe all I need is a dehumidifier.

Thanks

-- "I don't know, we haven't played Alabama yet." -- Vince Lombardi after being asked what it felt like to be the greatest football team in the world just after winning the '66 Super Bowl.


20 replies so far

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jonah

1448 posts in 3134 days


#1 posted 06-04-2017 04:09 PM

If you aren’t conditioning the space, you need more ventilation. The tricky part is going to be keeping condensation out of the insulation during periods of temperature change.

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unbob

800 posts in 1739 days


#2 posted 06-04-2017 06:44 PM

I watched a pro crew cleaning up mold, they used SimpleGreen. I was told not to use bleach.
Mold is really bad for you be sure to clean it up, and do what you have to stop it from growing.

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BamaCummins

67 posts in 3411 days


#3 posted 06-04-2017 06:45 PM

I wonder what the cost would be just to condition all the time just like your house? Since it is a small space, would need a small unit, costs might not be too bad per month

-- "I don't know, we haven't played Alabama yet." -- Vince Lombardi after being asked what it felt like to be the greatest football team in the world just after winning the '66 Super Bowl.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4802 posts in 3796 days


#4 posted 06-04-2017 06:49 PM

Didja ever think about a stupid old fan?
Air circulation goes a LONG way.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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BamaCummins

67 posts in 3411 days


#5 posted 06-04-2017 07:03 PM



Didja ever think about a stupid old fan?
Air circulation goes a LONG way.
Bill

Sure, but is that going to exchange air?

- Bill White


-- "I don't know, we haven't played Alabama yet." -- Vince Lombardi after being asked what it felt like to be the greatest football team in the world just after winning the '66 Super Bowl.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

5050 posts in 2101 days


#6 posted 06-04-2017 07:09 PM

You might consider an epoxy floor coating. After I did mine concrete floor I noticed a very obvious level of humidity in my shop. I chose a light color, yellow. It really added to the brightness of the shop and has made clean up easier. I can’t speak to getting rid mold. I just know the epoxy floor coating really reduce the humidity in my garage.

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WhyMe

910 posts in 1396 days


#7 posted 06-04-2017 08:24 PM

Did you place a vapor barrier below the concrete? I have a small detached garage/shop built years ago and putting down a vapor barrier just wasn’t done. So during summer months when needed I run a window AC unit while I’m out there working and the rest of the time there is a dehumidifier running. It’s a 70 pint and I have to empty it about once a week. It’s amazing how much better it feels with just the dehumidifier running. I don’t try to keep it like a desert environment but keep the humidity down to 60-65 percent. Seeing our humidity runs around 80 to 90 percent during the summer 65 percent feels good.

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papadan

3584 posts in 3204 days


#8 posted 06-04-2017 08:38 PM

Put a couple wall vents in at ground level on one end of the building and an exhaust fan at the top middle of the other end.

View BamaCummins's profile

BamaCummins

67 posts in 3411 days


#9 posted 06-04-2017 09:34 PM

Definitely put vapor barrier down.


Did you place a vapor barrier below the concrete? I have a small detached garage/shop built years ago and putting down a vapor barrier just wasn t done. So during summer months when needed I run a window AC unit while I m out there working and the rest of the time there is a dehumidifier running. It s a 70 pint and I have to empty it about once a week. It s amazing how much better it feels with just the dehumidifier running. I don t try to keep it like a desert environment but keep the humidity down to 60-65 percent. Seeing our humidity runs around 80 to 90 percent during the summer 65 percent feels good.

- WhyMe


-- "I don't know, we haven't played Alabama yet." -- Vince Lombardi after being asked what it felt like to be the greatest football team in the world just after winning the '66 Super Bowl.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

867 posts in 1788 days


#10 posted 06-04-2017 10:18 PM

Too late for a vapor barrier under the pad, but the epoxy coating that was suggested might help a lot. I agree with several others that ventilation is the key here. Get some air moving. If ventilation is not enough to remove the problem, then you will have to go in with the suggested Lysol or bleach treatments to kill off what is currently present.

When I moved in to my present house (built new on spec) I had a bunch of stuff in the basement and then the rains came. While the grading was enough to run the water away from the foundation, a heavy rain would soak in and the water table would rise above the bottoms of the window wells. You could watch then fill up like an aquarium. That led to water in the basement and I had an amazing bloom of mildew. I had some old golf clubs with leather wrapped grips in a bag that was standing upright. Pull a club and see a grip covered with green. Amazing. I had to nuke everything in the basement with Lysol and bleach, but it did cure the problem. I solved the rising water problem with silicone caulk on the windows and later by adding an addition and fixing the problem for good.

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rustfever

741 posts in 3145 days


#11 posted 06-04-2017 10:48 PM

A complete vapor barrier under the concrete is necessary. An added epoxy ‘vapor barrier’ on top of the concrete is a waste of money and effort. Try to move more air using vents low on the walls and in the ceiling/roof.

-- Rustfever, Central California

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Kazooman

867 posts in 1788 days


#12 posted 06-04-2017 11:20 PM



A complete vapor barrier under the concrete is necessary. An added epoxy vapor barrier on top of the concrete is a waste of money and effort. Try to move more air using vents low on the walls and in the ceiling/roof.

- rustfever

Just curious, out of a total lack of in depth knowledge on the subject. What is the difference, in the final result, of a vapor barrier under the concrete pad and an impermeable vapor barrier on top of the concrete pad? Epoxy would shut down the moisture 100%. The only difference I can see, at first glance, is some effect on the concrete itself. No moisture above the pad with a good vapor barrier versus no moisture above the pad with an epoxy coating. Is there a difference?

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builtinbkyn

1921 posts in 776 days


#13 posted 06-05-2017 12:12 AM

The vapor barrier is a heck of a lot cheaper than the epoxy coating. Also easier to apply. Will the epoxy work? Sure as long as the concrete stays as one piece. If it develops cracks, then there’s the potential for moisture penetration. The cracks can be sealed as long as there’s nothing concealing them.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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rustfever

741 posts in 3145 days


#14 posted 06-05-2017 01:26 AM

A concrete vapor barrier is a system. It reguires a layer of drain rock, vapor barrier [ie: Visqueen or similar], and then a layer of sand. Over which the concrete is carefully placed. If moisture is allowed to migrate into the concrete, then all is lost. Epoxy may help for a few days/weeks/month, but will fail. Money lost.

I spent 40 years as a professional concrete contractor, dealing with all level of high-teck concrete for business and industry. I have been paid mega $$ in the restoration of improperly place concrete and vapor barriers.

Pay me now or pay me X-times later.

-- Rustfever, Central California

View IHRedRules's profile

IHRedRules

112 posts in 1311 days


#15 posted 06-05-2017 02:37 AM

Once you clean up the mold, use a simple dehumidifier and keep an eye on the humidity. I bet that will fix your problem.

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