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How to join table top lip

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Forum topic by ShiverMeTimbers posted 06-04-2017 03:45 AM 1034 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ShiverMeTimbers

4 posts in 408 days


06-04-2017 03:45 AM

Hi there,

I’m very new to woodworking. I’m planning to build a version of the table shown here:

http://i1279.photobucket.com/albums/y526/chilkootcanine/4c7bbf940697a975a91d3d1bdb5db32d_zpsz1ymllpy.jpg

The table top will have breadboard ends with a tenon and offset dowel attachment. My question is about the lip/skirt underneath the top. How do I join that to the tabletop in a way that will allow for wood movement and wont cause any problems down the road?

thanks in advance.


16 replies so far

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3394 days


#1 posted 06-04-2017 04:40 AM

They make some little figure 8 brackets that screw down on top of the skirt boards and then up into the top. They will allow a little movement in the top.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

11792 posts in 2406 days


#2 posted 06-04-2017 04:43 AM

Such a bad table design but yeah, figure 8 is probably the best option.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View pontic's profile

pontic

591 posts in 634 days


#3 posted 06-04-2017 10:05 AM

I agree with RickM

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

489 posts in 408 days


#4 posted 06-04-2017 11:08 AM

Why is this a bad table design?


Such a bad table design but yeah, figure 8 is probably the best option.

- Rick M


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Ron Aylor

2636 posts in 673 days


#5 posted 06-04-2017 12:03 PM

Assuming the skirt is attached to the frame … you could use a series of wooden buttons …
 
              

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  https://ronaylor.wordpress.com

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1067 posts in 2875 days


#6 posted 06-04-2017 01:55 PM

I like to use Z clips, set a slot into the inside of the apron and then screw the clip to the top, essentially the same as the wood button

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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ChefHDAN

1067 posts in 2875 days


#7 posted 06-04-2017 02:04 PM


Why is this a bad table design

IMHO – - It’s a construction lumber build using lower quality lumber and a faux distressed look to give the “Rustic” impression but really disguising a lack of skill in wood working and finishing… it’s essentially a picnic table

That said,each LJ here has their early work that is likely in the basement of our mothers house and clearly shows the beginning of the learning curve before practice and proper tools. If the style and design works for you than go for it, what’s important is making sawdust and getting the shop time, I have pieces that I’ve broken up with a hammer and pieces that only I can see the defects in and others that I’m pleased with, however after completing each project I usually feel it’s my best work to date because I get better with the practice.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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ShiverMeTimbers

4 posts in 408 days


#8 posted 06-04-2017 02:15 PM

I’ve seen the z-clips before and I think they might be a good option. What would be the best way to join the skirt to the frame then? Pocket holes? Is there a nicer looking option? (even though it’s up high under the table out of view) Is the base made out of 2×6’s? I’m thinking i want to use a nicer wood on the top (perhaps walnut). Should i be making the base out of the same wood for an even appearance?

Thanks for all the help.

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ShiverMeTimbers

4 posts in 408 days


#9 posted 06-04-2017 06:32 PM

Also what do you think the dimensions of that cross beam are?

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ShiverMeTimbers

4 posts in 408 days


#10 posted 06-05-2017 09:38 PM

hopefully someone can answer these last few followup questions. I don’t think they warrant an entire post of their own. :)

View JayT's profile (online now)

JayT

5676 posts in 2237 days


#11 posted 06-05-2017 10:24 PM

The problem with answering those questions is that the pictured table is not made from solid wood, so it doesn’t matter how it was built. According to the page on Pottery Barn, that table is made from ” kiln-dried solid pine, particle board and pine veneers.” And only part made of pine is probably the base. Since they most likely used particle board for the large top, they don’t have to worry about seasonal wood movement and can just glue and screw it together. If the table was solid wood, then movement would have to be taken into account and that leads to different construction methods and, most likely, a different overall look.

The first decision that needs made is what look you want. If you want a “rustic” look, then there’s no need to use walnut. If you are wanting the fine furniture look of walnut, then that design isn’t the right direction to go, IMHO. While many beautiful tables have been built with contrasting woods for the base and top, that design doesn’t lend itself to that type of look.

You state in the OP that you are very new to woodworking (that’s OK, we all started somewhere) and one lesson all of us have to learn is to be realistic about our knowledge and skill level. To many beginners doing woodworking looks so easy, just glue and screw some boards together and presto, a table. The reality is that it takes time and experience to be able to learn even the basics of the craft. The reason I point that out is that a dining table is not the best way to jump in. It’s good that you recognize the need to ask questions, but the challenges of the sheer size and necessary strength requirements that must be taken into account during construction are like teaching someone to swim by dropping them out of a helicopter in the open ocean a couple miles from shore. Even if someone has told you all you need to know about swimming, the lack of actual experience means there is a far greater likelihood of tragedy than success.

I don’t want to discourage you from pursuing woodworking, I just would suggest starting with some smaller projects.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1067 posts in 2875 days


#12 posted 06-22-2017 12:10 PM

SMT, Jay makes a great point, and an end / occasional table could be a good beginning point. How are you set for tools and do you have any sort of local lumber supply aside from construction grade lumber? I built my very first set of end tables with just a circular saw & a drill…. one is in the basement and one is in the shop, LOL…

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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johnstoneb

2939 posts in 2199 days


#13 posted 06-22-2017 12:41 PM

I see nothing wrong with the actual design of the table. I don’t like it and wouldn’t build it personally. If the OP likes it then build it. I think it is a good project to start with. Construction lumber is relatively inexpensive so mistakes can be corrected without a large expense.

The leg frame look like probably 2×6. The skirt frame looks probably the same but could be 2×4. I would join the skirt and probably the top with pocket holes and screw as they can’t be seen. Pocket holes won’t work fastening the leg frame to table just use straight screws. you will need to mortise the bread board ends on. This will be a great project to learn on.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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GR8HUNTER

4007 posts in 738 days


#14 posted 06-22-2017 02:38 PM

8 clips fast and easy …WELCOME 2 LJ’s :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5705 posts in 2839 days


#15 posted 06-22-2017 04:06 PM

Figure 8 fasteners are my choice of hardware. I much prefer them over wooden clips or Z clips.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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