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End table is level in shop but not in house

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Forum topic by JohnnyBoy1981 posted 06-03-2017 09:22 PM 447 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JohnnyBoy1981

197 posts in 221 days


06-03-2017 09:22 PM

Topic tags/keywords: wobble uneven legs

I’ve finally gotten back to my end table project made out of 2×4’s and pocket holes. I’m generally happy with it but it certainly showed me some areas I need work in.

I basically don’t have level surface in my house or garage/shop it seems. And now that I’ve gotten a leg wobble, I don’t want to try any more cutting until I’ve got a game plan.

My saw horse and plywood ‘workbench’ is fairly level according to my cheap plastic level. I identified the longest leg by hanging it over the table edge until the other legs were flush and my level bubble was centered. I cut off approximately 1/8” with my jigsaw and it looked great! I brought it in the house and placed it where I wanted it. The wobble was back severely.

My house was built in 1949 and has old wood floors, so I guess the floor itself might be uneven. It’s a square table so finding a level sweet spot by rotating it doesn’t really work.

Any thoughts or suggestions as to what I can do to get this table level?


11 replies so far

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

843 posts in 1736 days


#1 posted 06-03-2017 09:52 PM

If your wooden floors are uneven, you will have the problem forever. Fix it for the current spot and then move it and the problem is back. You may not like the look, but you might have to go with adjustable feet under the legs. If you recess them in a hole drilled in the legs you can minimize the height the leg will be above the floor.

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

751 posts in 1225 days


#2 posted 06-03-2017 10:54 PM

Here’s what I do in this situation:

Place the table in the desired location.
Shim the legs until the top sits level (or as close as you think is adequate)
Use a spacer block and pencil to mark the legs an equal—and minimal—distance off the floor (the shortest leg should get minimal to no mark)
Cut the legs at the mark—can be done with a hand saw, belt sander, grinder, block plane, ....)

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

1830 posts in 724 days


#3 posted 06-04-2017 12:02 AM

Just cut and fit a small shim to take the wobble out and level it off. You can tack it on the bottom of the leg(s) with a small brad or some glue. If you ever need to remove it, it will be easy.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

887 posts in 1894 days


#4 posted 06-04-2017 12:21 AM



Here s what I do in this situation:

Place the table in the desired location.
Shim the legs until the top sits level (or as close as you think is adequate)
Use a spacer block and pencil to mark the legs an equal—and minimal—distance off the floor (the shortest leg should get minimal to no mark)
Cut the legs at the mark—can be done with a hand saw, belt sander, grinder, block plane, ....)

- jerryminer

I just did this today on a kitchen table. Works well.

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany

View JohnnyBoy1981's profile

JohnnyBoy1981

197 posts in 221 days


#5 posted 06-04-2017 12:22 AM

All good ideas. Thanks!

Jerryminer, could you explain to me what a spacer block is?

If I understand conceptually, it sounds a bit like a YouTube video I saw where a guy leveled some bench legs by using a compass to measure the gap on the shortest leg, than transferred that measurement to the other legs to be cut down.
Am I anywhere close?

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2825 posts in 2892 days


#6 posted 06-04-2017 12:25 AM

I just use felt pads. If you build something on your garage floor, it’s pretty much guaranteed to not be level when it does go to a level surface. It may well have been that the table would have sat flat on the floor in your house, without modifying the legs.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

751 posts in 1225 days


#7 posted 06-04-2017 12:33 AM



All good ideas. Thanks!

Jerryminer, could you explain to me what a spacer block is?

If I understand conceptually, it sounds a bit like a YouTube video I saw where a guy leveled some bench legs by using a compass to measure the gap on the shortest leg, than transferred that measurement to the other legs to be cut down.
Am I anywhere close?

- JohnnyBoy1981


Yes. that’s it. You can use a compass or a spacer block. Same process.

A spacer block is just a small piece of wood that is the thickness of the amount of wood you want to take off. Set it on the floor and mark along the top of the block onto the leg.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

3027 posts in 3311 days


#8 posted 06-04-2017 01:03 AM

I would go with shims or felt pads rather than trying to get it level in one particular spot in the house.

Our house is about 220 years old so I make a lot of items with three legs!

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View JohnnyBoy1981's profile

JohnnyBoy1981

197 posts in 221 days


#9 posted 06-04-2017 01:53 AM



I would go with shims or felt pads rather than trying to get it level in one particular spot in the house.

Our house is about 220 years old so I make a lot of items with three legs!

- ChuckV

Lol, maybe the pads/shims is the way to go. I sort of feel like I’m cheating though

View JohnnyBoy1981's profile

JohnnyBoy1981

197 posts in 221 days


#10 posted 06-04-2017 04:53 PM

I just took a level to the floor under the table. The floor slopes a good ways down where the back two legs of the table sit. Now I wish I hadn’t trimmed that leg!

View rodneywt1180b's profile

rodneywt1180b

149 posts in 170 days


#11 posted 06-06-2017 02:30 PM

Check your level too. My shop leans about 3/4” top to bottom due to my using a bad level. Lesson learned.

-- Rodney, Centralia, WA, USA www.etsy.com/shop/ASturdyStick

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