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Need tips for lumber storage in small basement

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Forum topic by jtrz posted 06-03-2017 07:13 PM 834 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jtrz

65 posts in 1006 days


06-03-2017 07:13 PM

I’m slowly getting my little basement wood shop into shape and was wondering if anyone has some advice on how I can best store lumber. I will be mainly be storing framing type lumber, 2x’s, 1x’s, etc. but every once in awhile I will some nicer pieces.

Here is a photo of space where the wood rack needs to go. It is far from ideal but there just isn’t any other place to put it:

If the joists ran the other direction I would just attach 2×4s onto them and use metal pipes. But I need the rack to go up against that wall and the only thing to attach to is that the joist that sits on the concrete wall. My initial thought was attaching 5 of these as shown in the photo (pardon the hand):

Now this could work but as you can see the joist braces take up a lot of space and I am reluctant to make the 2×4’s much longer because they are essentially hanging and I am worried about the weight of a bunch of wood sitting up there.

So what are your alls thoughts on my predicament? Any ideas?

Because I am going to use part of that back wall for some kind of peg storage and my work bench and other tool carts will go up against the wall, I really can only use the top few feet for wood storage. But if I could get 2 or maybe 3 levels of storage that would be great.

Another note is that the joists are probably 80 years old so they are rock hard so any tips on the best way to attach 2x material to them would also be very helpful.

Thanks as always

Any ideas would be great


18 replies so far

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AZWoody

1138 posts in 1057 days


#1 posted 06-03-2017 07:15 PM

If the pieces are not taller than the ceiling, just go vertical. Then you don’t have to worry about bearing a load on anything other than the floor.

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jtrz

65 posts in 1006 days


#2 posted 06-03-2017 07:22 PM

Can I store wood that I have jointed and planed vertically? If so, is there any trick to designing this type of a storage system? I’ve seen ways to store plywood vertically which is what I am doing in another part of the basement but I’ve never seen lumber stored vertically.

Thanks

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jtrz

65 posts in 1006 days


#3 posted 06-03-2017 07:23 PM

Oh and I am trying to avoid drilling into the concrete since that may come up.

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AZWoody

1138 posts in 1057 days


#4 posted 06-03-2017 08:33 PM



Can I store wood that I have jointed and planed vertically? If so, is there any trick to designing this type of a storage system? I ve seen ways to store plywood vertically which is what I am doing in another part of the basement but I ve never seen lumber stored vertically.

Thanks

- jtrz

Yes you can. Some people say that the wood will bow but I have 90% of my lumber stores vertically with no problems. I’m sure if you lean it at an extreme angle you might run into problems.

You don’t need to attach anything to the floor. Maybe just lay a piece of plywood down to keep the lumber off the concrete as it may pick up moisture from the floor. All you need to do is attach some kind of support on the wall that will keep the lumber vertical. Kind of like that pipe you have showing but it does not have to bear as much weight.

Go look at my projects and you’ll see my storage racks. If you have more pieces of that pipe and the mount, you’re good to go. Now, if you need the floor space, then you’ll have to go horizontal.

For me, it’s just a lot easier going through my lumber to pick out the right pieces when it’s vertical.

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sreilly24590

86 posts in 265 days


#5 posted 06-03-2017 08:59 PM

Or you could build a free standing horizontal rack that would suffice as well. That keeps the lumber off the concrete where it could wick up moisture. Making it say 3-4 feet deep should give it stability and then go as high as you need.

-- Steve, Virginia

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jtrz

65 posts in 1006 days


#6 posted 06-03-2017 11:04 PM

Just occurred to me that I don’t have the clearance to store vertically. I think I am going to go ahead with initial plan just so I have something. We will see how it turns out.

Thanks

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sreilly24590

86 posts in 265 days


#7 posted 06-03-2017 11:17 PM

Why not a freestanding unit like shelves without shelving boards? You make make as large or small as needed. Heck you could put it on casters.

-- Steve, Virginia

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jtrz

65 posts in 1006 days


#8 posted 06-03-2017 11:29 PM

It’s all about square footage at the moment. I am in the corner of a basement so i have two walls at my disposal. Here is an photo to give you a better idea of what I am dealing with:

The wall without all of the pipes and breaker box is where I need to be put my bench and other tools that will have carts when they are not in use. So a two foot deep shelf just isn’t practical. And where I have one of those cheap home depot shelves on the left in the picture is right next to the water heater so I am a little reluctant to store wood that I have gotten nice and square there. And there is only about 5 or 6 feet of space there anyways.

View hairy's profile

hairy

2579 posts in 3365 days


#9 posted 06-04-2017 12:33 PM

I keep small pieces in the basement, big pieces in the garage. I move long pieces inside to acclimate before using. I mostly make small projects. I use a cart for rough pieces. I see no reason to square and surface it until needed.

That pipe rack looks like a bad idea waiting to happen. These are easy to make, keep the spacing 24” or less. Make them any size you need.

-- My reality check bounced...

View jonah's profile

jonah

1443 posts in 3131 days


#10 posted 06-04-2017 12:57 PM

There’s nothing wrong with hanging 2×4s off the rim joist and then putting pipe or wood supports on that. You’d want to use sizable screws or even 1/4” lag bolts to attach the 2×4s. Be sure to pre drill all the holes.

You can actually relocated that cross bracing along that joist bay if you need to. They don’t need to be lined up with the others to do their job, which is to prevent the joists from racking or twisting.

View eflanders's profile

eflanders

218 posts in 1683 days


#11 posted 06-04-2017 01:22 PM

I’ve had my share of small shops over the years, they take some creativity for sure! One thing I did was to make some “T” brackets out of 11/2” angle iron. The bottom of the T was attached to the floor joist with a 5/16 bolt. The T was welded at the intersection, (but could be bolted). This allows double sided storage and I placed mine above my workbench. I also had storage under the workbench attached to the trestle legs. Take advantage of all of the storage space between the joists as well. You have a lot of space for long stock, just not sheet stock. For sheet stock, I kept it in my garage against a wall in a swing out type cart. My home made panel saw was (and still is) mounted up in the ceiling and swings down on hinges for cutting sheet stock to rough size before bringing down to my basement shop.
Good luck!

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Mr_Pink

17 posts in 204 days


#12 posted 06-04-2017 03:35 PM

I also have a small basement shop, but my exterior walls are uneven limestone block. I store some pieces under four feet long on the lower half of a wire shelving unit I got from a big box store. I store the rest vertically, but not all in the same place. Vertical storage can be as flexible (disorganized) as you want it to be.

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jtrz

65 posts in 1006 days


#13 posted 06-04-2017 04:17 PM

Thanks for all of the responses.

hairy />A shop cart for rough lumber is what I will need at some point but right now I am mainly working with 2x material. So my rough lumber right now consists of 8’ 2×4’s (and later this afternoon it is going to consist of a ton of 50 year old 1x of unknown species (probably pine) that I have to get out of my recently deceased great uncles basement. These boards will be 8’ – 9’.

The basement I’m working in is 7’2” to top of joist and 7’11” to above subfloor. I don’t have a lot of room so finding a nice out of the way place for my wood is essential. The wood brackets would be perfect but I would need to either frame a 2×4 fur wall against the concrete or drill directly into the concrete which my friend slash roommate would not be happy about. So I am trying to avoid any major alterations.

jonah />I’ve thought about moving the bracing and I may end up doing it. I wonder if I could actually mount the pipe mounts directly to the joist and then add an L connection and another longer piece. That way I could get part of the pipe below the joist so it will be easier to grab lumber.

I just wonder what kind of load black pipe can take, specifically where it threads into the mounts and connections. The mounts are labeled “floor mounts”.

And, yea, pre drilling holes in those joists is a must. Those things are hard as rocks.

eflanders />The T bracket is a good idea. I’ve got a friend with a metal shop so I could fabricate them there. I’d rather not bolt them together.

I think I am going to have to use the space in between the joists, as I mentioned above. It is just the only thing that makes sense and saves the most space. I can make a more accessible and smaller rack for lumber that I have trued up and is ready to be used.

I mentioned this above but I will ask it again. Does anyone know how much weight this black pipe can take when it is threaded? I would drill holes into 1.5” side of a 2×4 and put the pipe in that way but without a drill press I am a bit reluctant.

Thanks for the ideas and if you have more keep them coming.

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hairy

2579 posts in 3365 days


#14 posted 06-04-2017 06:05 PM

Make a freestanding bench/shelf/lumber rack. Out of 2x material. Use it all up, then you won’t need a rack anymore. Get some shims,or keep it level as you build, I doubt your floor is level.

Screw it together. Someday you can take it apart and make something else from it.

-- My reality check bounced...

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papadan

3584 posts in 3201 days


#15 posted 06-04-2017 06:23 PM

Jeff, why all the 2X material? I cut all my stock at 6’, wont ever need anything longer. If you’re gonna build a larger(8’) bench then just go ahead and build it instead of storing the wood for it. Let me know if you need help hauling your uncles lumber or anything. Dan

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