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Rockler Miter Fold Dado Set

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Forum topic by Rich posted 06-02-2017 03:29 PM 2083 views 0 times favorited 43 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rich

1875 posts in 403 days


06-02-2017 03:29 PM

Topic tags/keywords: humor tablesaw blade

Good grief. A $350 blade so I can “Fold a single sheet of plywood into a neat, seamless box with just a few cuts.”

I’ll pass, thanks.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.


43 replies so far

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

991 posts in 1809 days


#1 posted 06-02-2017 03:40 PM

It’s a bit pricey if you already have a Dado set. But it sure does speed things up. Check out the YouTube videos of it. The guy who invented it is Andrew Klein.

I’m a bit biased because I know him personally (we used to work together), but I want to see it do well. I also want to see sawstop support it so I can have one.

I find that I have so little time in the shop, spending money on tools of convinience helps me get stuff done and feel like I accomplish something in the time I do have.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

710 posts in 309 days


#2 posted 06-02-2017 04:00 PM

This seems like a good alternative if you don’t have a router table. A $11 v groove bit on the RT will accomplish the same thing. I’d like the see a comparison of cross grain gear out between the two to see if there is a quality difference in the cuts.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Rich

1875 posts in 403 days


#3 posted 06-02-2017 04:11 PM

I’m not disputing the ingenuity of the design. It’s the fact that the final product is a plywood box. That doesn’t strike me as a product worth $350 to create, no matter how easy it is.

Maybe I’m missing something. It wouldn’t be the first time.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View DS's profile (online now)

DS

2792 posts in 2234 days


#4 posted 06-02-2017 04:20 PM

Here is a link I found for this set

In high-end contemporary cabinetry we are wearing out miterfold router bits all the time.
To me, this looks like an innovative new way to make this joint. I am impressed!

The cost is a bit steep, yes.
But try miterfolding a 8ft long finished end panel with a router bit, (In $400 per sheet sequence-matched Exotic veneer plywood no less), then tell me which is the right tool for the job.
The cost of one screw up with a router would more than pay for this blade.

I just found this post and know very little about the product. (This is not an endorsement)
Just saying, the router bit method really sucks when you have lots of very large pieces and the cost of making mistakes is really high.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3546 posts in 2123 days


#5 posted 06-02-2017 07:02 PM

If the blade is supposed to be 1/32 below the surface of the plywood how do you maintain that spec with today plywood varying in thickness throughout the same sheet let alone several different sheets. Most successful miter folding I’ve seen is done on a CNC machine cutting from the above which takes care of thickness variations in stock thickness. 1/32 isn’t a whole lot to play with.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Loren's profile

Loren

9559 posts in 3462 days


#6 posted 06-02-2017 07:14 PM

Yeah, I think it might work better making
the cuts from above on a radial arm saw.

There was an article many years ago about
a custom-made setup for making miter
folded boxes for some electrical equipment.
The fellow used a radial arm saw with
a v-groove cutter on it.

On the table saw any deviation from flat in
the board or out-of-spec thickness is
likely to cause a depth variation.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6391 posts in 3182 days


#7 posted 06-02-2017 07:48 PM

I understand the possible value in a cabinet shop but yikes, it cost more than my table saw … 45 years ago!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Rich's profile

Rich

1875 posts in 403 days


#8 posted 06-02-2017 08:20 PM

I’m glad I posted this. The blade initially left me shaking my head, but you all cleared up things nicely.

DS — I can see it from a production shop perspective. Thanks for clearing that up for me.
AlaskaGuy — That was what kept coming up in my thoughts on it. The cut from the top makes sense, just as Loren pointed out.
Loren — That makes total sense. I hadn’t thought of it that way.

Everyone else, thanks for your input. I still won’t be buying in the foreseeable future :)

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5422 posts in 2627 days


#9 posted 06-02-2017 08:54 PM

I hope the product does well at Rockler. New woodworking innovations are few and far between. It’s always good to see innovation in the field.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Jeff8529's profile

Jeff8529

4 posts in 141 days


#10 posted 07-04-2017 04:39 AM

What about the strength of the box? How would it compare to other drawer construction methods?

View mski's profile

mski

439 posts in 3794 days


#11 posted 07-04-2017 05:20 AM

Snake Oil !!!

-- MARK IN BOB, So. CAL

View WhoMe's profile

WhoMe

1564 posts in 3057 days


#12 posted 07-04-2017 05:58 AM



Snake Oil !!!

- mski


Gotta love comments like this with absolutely no merit.

Having used one of these sets multiple times, it does work as advertised. Like any specialized tool, it takes a little time to learn to use it. There is a bit of setup and you need to pay attention to your measurements. But once there, it works very well and the folded joint looks really nice.
It is well made with thick carbide teeth and tight tolerances on the arbor holes. It cuts very clean with a very flat bottom dado. As a comparison, a Forrest dado king runs $290 – $320 a set for just a dado stack, this set adds the folding blade to the mix. And you don’t have to use the fold blade all the time, it can be used as a standard dado stack up to 7\8” wide.
Having said that, it may not be the best choice for someone who makes 1 or 2 boxes infrequently but for someone who makes a lot of boxes/drawers with full thickness bottoms, it should be a serious consideration.

-- I'm not clumsy.. It's just the floor hates me, the tables and chairs are bullies, the wall gets in the way AAANNNDDD table saws BITE my fingers!!!.. - Mike -

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3546 posts in 2123 days


#13 posted 07-04-2017 06:47 AM



I m not disputing the ingenuity of the design. It s the fact that the final product is a plywood box. That doesn t strike me as a product worth $350 to create, no matter how easy it is.

Maybe I m missing something. It wouldn t be the first time.

- RichTaylor

I guess we should all get rid of our expensive table saws and go back to hand saw.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3546 posts in 2123 days


#14 posted 07-04-2017 06:56 AM


Snake Oil !!!

- mski

Gotta love comments like this with absolutely no merit.

Having used one of these sets multiple times, it does work as advertised. Like any specialized tool, it takes a little time to learn to use it. There is a bit of setup and you need to pay attention to your measurements. But once there, it works very well and the folded joint looks really nice.
It is well made with thick carbide teeth and tight tolerances on the arbor holes. It cuts very clean with a very flat bottom dado. As a comparison, a Forrest dado king runs $290 – $320 a set for just a dado stack, this set adds the folding blade to the mix. And you don t have to use the fold blade all the time, it can be used as a standard dado stack up to 78” wide.
Having said that, it may not be the best choice for someone who makes 1 or 2 boxes infrequently but for someone who makes a lot of boxes/drawers with full thickness bottoms, it should be a serious consideration.

- WhoMe

Sometimes a little humor is a good thing.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3546 posts in 2123 days


#15 posted 07-04-2017 07:06 AM

Made in China, I hope Rockler keep close check on quality control.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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