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Need suggestions: which sprayer to buy for small cabinet shop

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Forum topic by SweetTea posted 06-02-2017 03:06 PM 3425 views 0 times favorited 43 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SweetTea

246 posts in 498 days


06-02-2017 03:06 PM

So I am looking to buy a new spray rig for my small cabinet shop. I have been getting by using a small Graco airless sprayer, the X5 I believe. I am now wanting to invest in a mid range turbine driven unit as the Graco airless just isn’t optimal. I will be spraying mostly latex acrylic water based paints, primers, and, clear coats such as water based poly.
Budget is at or under $1,000.00. What can you guys recommend for me?

I have looked at the Earlex 5500 and I like the price, but don’t really know what to get.


43 replies so far

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Rich

1984 posts in 427 days


#1 posted 06-02-2017 05:07 PM

There are several good products out there, and I’m sure reviews can be found for all of them. I bought a Fuji Q4 maybe 20 years ago that’s still going strong. I’d love to upgrade to one of the modern guns that have better adjustment features, but in the long run, the increased ease of use doesn’t justify the cost for me. I can make all of the same adjustments with mine, it just involved a steeper learning curve (which I’m well past by now).

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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AlaskaGuy

3657 posts in 2147 days


#2 posted 06-02-2017 05:34 PM

With out a doubt if it were me (and this is what I did) is call Jeff Jewitt @ homestead finishing. Tell him you need help picking a spray system. He’s helpful, knowledgeable and easy to talk to.

216-631-5309

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Fred Hargis

4762 posts in 2331 days


#3 posted 06-02-2017 05:42 PM

I agree, Jeff Jewitt will have good recos. That said, I also have a Fuji 4 stage (Jeff used to sell Fuji, I believe) though mines a Super Gold 4 and it has been a great unit. All I spray is waterborne and shellac with it.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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SweetTea

246 posts in 498 days


#4 posted 06-03-2017 04:04 PM

How is the Fuji 2 stage semi pro 2 compared to the Fuji 3 stage Mini Mite 3 or the Mini Mite 4? For my purposes of spraying water based paints and primers in addition to spraying water based poly, do I really need anything more than a 2 stage unit?

How do the Fuji Semiv

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SweetTea

246 posts in 498 days


#5 posted 06-03-2017 04:06 PM

And does anyone own the Earlex 5500? How would it do compared to the Fuji Semi Pro 2 stage units? I will call Jeff on Monday. Would call today but it’s Saturday and I doubt that he is at work.

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CharlesNeil

2144 posts in 3709 days


#6 posted 06-03-2017 05:37 PM

Fuji.. at least 3 stage ..

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firefighterontheside

16943 posts in 1695 days


#7 posted 06-03-2017 05:46 PM

I have the 5500 and love it, but I can’t recommend it for latex paints. I have had good luck spraying appropriately thinned oil based paints, but not latex. I think it lacks the power needed. I have also had great experience spraying thinned tinted lacquer from target coatings.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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SweetTea

246 posts in 498 days


#8 posted 06-04-2017 12:17 PM

For spraying latex primers and paints on bare cabinets and cabinet doors, is an airless sprayer going to be very good? Do they provide a very quality finish in that regard?

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firefighterontheside

16943 posts in 1695 days


#9 posted 06-04-2017 01:12 PM

I believe that you can get a good finish. The bad thing I’ve heard about airless, especially for a small shop is that you waste a lot of paint filling up the hose and then cleanup is more involved. The best sprayed “paint” I’ve ever done was with the target coatings lacquer. It’s water based, water cleanup.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Louis Petrolia's profile

Louis Petrolia

28 posts in 1671 days


#10 posted 06-04-2017 02:49 PM

I am back on this site after 2013. I have been on other finishing sites. In my opinion Lumberjocks is at the top of my favourites. You may be able to check out my gallery and finishing projects which I received with much interest. I will be entering a new project shortly which may interest those finishing gurus.
To your question Sweet Tea. I am happy to read that you have a budget set at $1000. However, this depends exactly how far you wish to pursue your finishing. I love finishing, and own a twin turbine Apollo model 1100 which I purchase back in 2002. True turbine HVLP with two p.s.i. settings between 6 and 10. Do not suggest a system using compressor. No No No. Require quality gun as well with good range of adjustment and great atomizing. Especially if you intend to spray dyes involving make up of toners etc.
I could go on. However, if you have any questions, glad to help in any way.

Shilothree

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Kelly

1821 posts in 2782 days


#11 posted 06-04-2017 05:58 PM

I have a Spraytech 2305 I’d only use for commercial spraying if I was trying to cover a whole lot of square feet in a hurry. Even with a fine tip, it tosses (bounces) a lot of material around. I like my HVLP’s for anything detailed.

I wouldn’t settle for anything less than a four stage system HVLP, which is what my Capspray unit is. Just a swap of the tips and I can do a fence, a fine cabinet or even a car.

I also have an Accuspray with a two gallon pressure pot. It’s a conversion system with a built in compressor. It has one of the best guns. That said, I’ve been very happy with the Capspray gun.

I had a three stage Graco and it was a good little unit, but I sold it and kept the more versatile four stage Wagner (now Titan).

I’ve seen units like my four stage on craigslist for $400 several times.

If you do go with a HVLP, I recommend a remote can, to allow you to get in tight spaces.

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Louis Petrolia

28 posts in 1671 days


#12 posted 06-04-2017 07:10 PM

Certainly have quite an assortment of spray systems. I am familiar with some of the products you mention.
The only system I own is the Apollo TWIN TURBINE model 1100. I know this system proven to do all my
finishing projects with accuracy spraying 100% acrylic,light or heavy consistency, spraying dye (toners etc.)
You mention that the systems you refer to are STAGES which is not the same as TURBINE. Accuracy of turbine is precise. When the Apollo is set between 6 and 10 p.s.i. it is constant, no matter the material used or the
length of time used. You mentioned that with your spraytech, even with a fine tip, it tosses (bounces) an
excess of material around. In my opinion, it is suggested to use an average size tip. Too fine a tip, then your adjustment has a tendency to expel more air, which does not atomize the material. Using the larger tip gives you more control. On my Apollo, I use a 1.4mm which does most material efficientlly. My suggestion is to buy an authentic turbine system such as Apollo if it is your intention to perfect your finishes with pride.
A friend of mine owns a 3 stage Fiji which is max 6 p.s.i. He must thin out when applying heavy paints etc.
Hope this info makes you do your homework and purchase one quality system and never be sorry.
Shilothree

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AlaskaGuy

3657 posts in 2147 days


#13 posted 06-04-2017 07:24 PM

Looks like fuji now has a 5 stage system with 9.5 PSI

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Kelly

1821 posts in 2782 days


#14 posted 06-04-2017 08:41 PM

In the past, “stages” was another way of saying turbines. Perhaps that has changed or, perhaps, Apollo or Fuji uses different terms. Perhaps that is because you can vary the air output of the Fuji systems, which seem to get rave reviews everywhere.

The only conversion I have is, as mentioned, the Accusprayer. The other is a true turbine system. The two are night and day apart.

If I bought a Capsprayer or a Titan, the number of stages indicated the number of turbines, or fans. For example, my Graco was a “3 Stage” and had three fans. My Capsprayer is a “4 Stage” and has four fans. Most the companies are pumping out five stage units and you can be pretty sure they have five fans (turbines).

While a fan and turbine may be different, in this instance, they do the same thing – move air.

A quick note about Apollos: I know people who brag on theirs. Haven’t ran one, but suspect they are worthy of their reviews, of which there are many and, with few exceptions, they are positive. Problem with them is, if you want used, there do not seem to be many of them around.

Mean time, I doubt anyone could show me a difference in an Apollo or a Fuji finish and one from my Capspayer. I can say, if I was buying new again, I’d probably go for the Apollo (I kept saying Fuji, but meant the Apollos).

Several talk about settling for a three stage. I, again, recommend a four or five stage. They are far better suited for latex and other finishes, in addition to the other usual finishes.
__
Here is a quote from the Wood Whisperer:

“Terminology

HVLP – High Volume Low Pressure. This refers to the fact that the gun pushes out a lot of finish without a lot of extra air. This cuts down on overspray and waste.

Turbine – That’s the box that blows the air. It contains a fan or series of fans that drives air through a hose and into the HVLP gun.

Stages – The number of fans inside the turbine. This is how Turbines are generally classified.
Viscosity – Refers to how thick the material is and is measured with a viscosity cup.

http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/choosing-right-turbine-hvlp-system/

This is from another, turbine site:

“HVLP turbine systems traditionally are rated by the number of fans – called stages – attached to the motor shaft. Single stage turbines have one fan; two-stage turbines have two fans, etc. The more stages, the higher the airflow and the higher the air pressure is at the spray gun.
what is hvlp – what is hvlp spray gun | Turbine Products”

www.turbineproducts.com/hvlp-information/

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Kelly

1821 posts in 2782 days


#15 posted 06-04-2017 09:17 PM

Just for reference and to avoid confusion:

1) My Spraytech is, as mentioned, an airless. It has about 2400 psi at the tip. If you don’t go to a small tip, you’ll drown the project. Of course, small for it is a .13 tip, but you can get .009 tips for varnishes;

2) Capsprayers and Titans or Fujis are as authentic as any turbine out there.

Both my Capsprayer and Accuspray guns accept needle changes for a reason. A larger needle is used when shooting, for example, latex. A smaller needle is for, say, an automotive or other thinner finishes.

I can spray acrylic for an auto finish using the latex tip, but will not get the nice, quality finish I would with the finer tip.

In my opinion, it is suggested to use an average size tip. Too fine a tip, then your adjustment has a tendency to expel more air, which does not atomize the material. Using the larger tip gives you more control. On my Apollo, I use a 1.4mm which does most material efficientlly. My suggestion is to buy an authentic turbine system such as Apollo if it is your intention to perfect your finishes with pride.
Shilothree

- Louis Petrolia


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