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Poll: What are your two best WW books, and what two do you want now?

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Forum topic by Lee Barker posted 11-27-2010 08:12 PM 1254 views 2 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2318 days


11-27-2010 08:12 PM

Topic tags/keywords: books mentors shop math

Yesterday I was idling at Barnes and Noble, and I spent a little time in the woodworking section.

Let’s see what two books have been of significant and/or ongoing value to you, and what two you’d like to add to your library.

HAVES:

“Tage Frid Teaches Woodworking” Vols 1 and 2 combined (Taunton, ISBN 1 56158 068 6) really got me started. I love his amused approach to the operations and simple solutions to things which would appear daunting to a beginner. I wish I could have known him and am thankful his book was there to mentor me.

“Designs for Wood” by Alonzo W. P. Ketless. c. 1978 Scribner’s, ISBN 0 684 15541 9 has the best section on shop math I’ve ever found. The 23 page chapter is called “Craft geometry and setting-out.” British.

WANTS:

Spray Finishing Made Simple by Jeff Jewitt. Taunton. ISBN-13: 978-1600850929.

Complete Guide to Sharpening by Leonard Lee. Taunton. ISBN-10: 1561581259

And you?

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"


9 replies so far

View sras's profile

sras

4392 posts in 2596 days


#1 posted 11-28-2010 01:23 AM

Hmmm, more difficult to identify the top two that I have. I have to admit that once I have read through a book I rearely go back to it. With that in mind, I would have to say my top two haves are:

1. Fine woodworking back issues on DVD. By a large margin, I find myself most often looking up a reference to a past article here. The ability to bookmark articles for future reference is a great feature.

2. Woodturning with Ray Allen by Dale Nish. Segmented turning is something I would like to try and I keep digging this one out for ideas or inspiration.

My top two wants are:

1. Taunton’s Complete Illustrated Guide to Jigs & Fixtures: Sandor Nagyszalanczy. You can never have enough jig ideas.

2. Greene & Greene: Darrell Peart. I have been learning about G&G ove rthe past couple years and am a big fan of Darrell’s work.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 2390 days


#2 posted 11-28-2010 01:28 AM

Measure twice,cut once. Old book been around forever. Has lots of good info in it.
I have several books I refer to.
I’ll admit, I used to get a lot of books at “Half Price Books” where I used to live. I choke on the price of new ones now so I usually use the library.

-- Life is good.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3143 days


#3 posted 11-28-2010 06:30 AM

Nick Engler’s Woodworking Encylopedia, or at least i think that is the name off the top of my head ;-)) covers everything you need to know. Not sure about #2.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2318 days


#4 posted 11-28-2010 03:52 PM

Howie and Topamax: on which list to the books you mentioned go?

sras—Thanks for the helpful response.

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View mvflaim's profile

mvflaim

183 posts in 2558 days


#5 posted 11-28-2010 04:19 PM

The Best woodworking book IMO is “Understanding Wood” by Bruce Hoadley, Taunton press. It reads more like a textbook but is full with so much info you’ll have to read it three times to absorb all of it.

Another great book is “Understanding Wood Finishing” by Bob Flexner. Finishing is the most important step in woodworking. If you have a nice piece with a terrible finish, people will notice it right away. However, even a decent piece will look great if it’s finished properly.

Other great books if you can find them are:

“The Chairmaker’s Workshop” Drew Langsner
“Contemporary American Woodworkers” Michael Stone
“Repairing and Using Classic Woodworking Tools” Mike Dunbar
“The Nature and Art of Workmanship” David Pye
“Chairmaking & Design” Jeff Miller
“The Woodwright’s Guide working with wedge and edge” Roy Underhill
“The Soul of a Tree” George Nakashima
“Workbenches” Chris Schwarz
“The Handplane Book” Garret Hack
“Hand Tool Essentials” Popular Woodworking
“A Cabinetmaker’s Notebook” James Krenov

I can go on and on….

Mike

-- http://mvflaim.wordpress.com/

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3143 days


#6 posted 11-28-2010 08:54 PM

I’d put Engler on the haves, it will replace a lot of others. It covers a lot!! :-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 2390 days


#7 posted 11-28-2010 09:23 PM

Haves for me
The author is Jim Toplin, most libraries have it.

-- Life is good.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2438 days


#8 posted 11-28-2010 10:02 PM

My two favorites:
Shop Notes “Tools and Jigs” contains plans for shop built drum sander and panel saw I plan to build and a wealth of other sleds and jigs.
Taunton Press “Shop Improvements” has some great accessories, jigs and fixtures for the router and cabinets and boxes for tool storage.
Popular Woodworking “Hand Tool Essentials” defines techniques for tool sharpening, holding, and use that I haven’t found anywhere else.
OOPS! I know that was three, but I wouldn’t want to part with any one of these.
Two that I want the most right now are:
“The Workbench Design Book” by Chris Schwarz of Popular Woodworking, because I just built a nice bench and would like this book as a source for ideas for improvement. Also, because I like to read anything by Chris.
Lastly, I am looking for a good reference for wood turning as I am a complete newbie in this area; haven’t even got my new lathe out of the box yet. Will be watching this thread to see what others think.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View BarbS's profile

BarbS

2434 posts in 3553 days


#9 posted 11-28-2010 11:55 PM

For turning newbies: Taunton’s Complete Illustrated Guide to Turning by Richard Raffan:” http://tinyurl.com/2ef5rhj":http://tinyurl.com/2ef5rhj

Second: Choosing and Using Hand Tools by Andy Rae: http://tinyurl.com/2ctudjq

Lots of others; I really can’t claim two favorites.

-- http://barbsid.blogspot.com/

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