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Forum topic by Greg posted 06-01-2017 05:52 PM 500 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Greg

21 posts in 222 days


06-01-2017 05:52 PM

Hi Folks,

I’ve managed to get the 7 layers of paint, varnish, primer and most of the stain off; it’s pretty much down to the wood. Overall, there’s some blotchiness which might mean the wood was originally dyed (?). Even with a fair amount of sanding, I can’t get the darker areas up so I need some help with next steps.

Is there a technique of staining or treatment that might help even out the light and dark areas, or not make the dark areas darker? When I wipe with mineral spirits, the darkness is accentuated (presumably because the min spirits are soaking in). I understand that stain sits on top of the wood. Would it be reasonable to assume that since it’s not soaking in, the dark parts might not stand out as much? Would a wood conditioner help on this still undetermined type of wood perhaps? I plan to use a fairly dark stain. Would a gel stain not saturate the darks as much?

Thanks so much!
Greg

You can see the initial thread on this topic here. Photos below (sorry for the sideways!)

Before

After sanding a fair amount


8 replies so far

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Loren

9627 posts in 3484 days


#1 posted 06-01-2017 06:01 PM

I think if you’re unable to accept the color
variations a transparent finish isn’t likely
to be satisfactory.

You might want to hire a faux finisher
to paint it to look like wood.

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Greg

21 posts in 222 days


#2 posted 06-01-2017 06:11 PM

Yeah, I will run a test. Some parts of the wood have a nice patina thing going on. I’m not looking for perfection but I want to show the grain but even out of mask the tone variation some. I think a darker stain might help.

Contingent on what answers I get, my next steps might be to just try something, a stain or a gel on a section and see what happens. I don’t want a faux finish though; might as well paint it! I do want to see the lovely grain on this wood, just not as much botchiness. I’m fine with a rustic, “patinafied ” look.

Thanks for you suggestions


I think if you re unable to accept the color
variations a transparent finish isn t likely
to be satisfactory.

You might want to hire a faux finisher
to paint it to look like wood.

- Loren


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OSU55

1424 posts in 1826 days


#3 posted 06-02-2017 12:19 PM

I would use dye, transtint, in Target wr4000 stain base, get the color and intensity right. Pre wet the wood and knock down raised grain with 320, apply dye, let dry, then use an airbrush with 1/2# cut shellac with dye to darken areas as necessary, then top coat, probably ob poly, but a wb poly could be brushed with foam brush.

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Greg

21 posts in 222 days


#4 posted 06-03-2017 03:44 PM

Intrigued by your suggestion. I don’t have an airbrush, however but I guess there are some cheap ones out there. So after dye-ing/staining, you’re suggesting airbrushing the light areas even though there’s a lot more light than dark?


I would use dye, transtint, in Target wr4000 stain base, get the color and intensity right. Pre wet the wood and knock down raised grain with 320, apply dye, let dry, then use an airbrush with 1/2# cut shellac with dye to darken areas as necessary, then top coat, probably ob poly, but a wb poly could be brushed with foam brush.

- OSU55


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OSU55

1424 posts in 1826 days


#5 posted 06-04-2017 12:59 PM

Yes. I seem to remember you prefer to have to grain show through, so that precludes a pigment stain. The intent would be for the dye to fairly closely match the dark areas. The dye would probably need to be pretty intense to color the light areas. This will require testing in usually unseen areas. The airbrush would then be used to blend light to dark. There would still be variation, just less of it. If you have access to a small air compressor (like a pancake) a regular spray gun dialed way back can be used as a large airbrush. HF has regular guns for ~$15. Use dewaxed shellac, like Zinsser sealcoat. A quart goes a long way since it will be cut back with dna 4:1.

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Kelly

1821 posts in 2781 days


#6 posted 06-05-2017 03:12 AM

Have you tried bleaching [then neutralizing] yet?

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Greg

21 posts in 222 days


#7 posted 06-05-2017 05:00 PM

I’ve had a couple people say absolutely don’t do it but so far no one touting the positives of bleaching.


Have you tried bleaching [then neutralizing] yet?

- Kelly


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OSU55

1424 posts in 1826 days


#8 posted 06-05-2017 09:41 PM

Woulnt hurt to try a spot in a hidden area

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