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Forum topic by tjbisme posted 06-01-2017 05:34 PM 539 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tjbisme

19 posts in 202 days


06-01-2017 05:34 PM

Topic tags/keywords: entertainment stand barn doors help ideas question

Hello everyone. I recently found myself looking for ways to improve my woodworking skills and I came across this forum. I’m hoping someone can help me out with a problem I am having with an entertainment stand I built for my house.

I made an entertainment stand for our basement and installed sliding barn doors. I had to make all the hardware for the sliding part, because anything we bought was way too big and meant for a full sized barn door. I made the sliding bar and the brackets out of aluminum, and the wheels are deconstructed pulleys. It works pretty nice but there is one thing I noticed that is a little bit off.

The bottom part of the door sticks out about 1.5 inches as its hanging on the sliding bar. I could add in a track along the bottom to keep the doors closer to the stand, but I don’t think the “project manager” would appreciate the look. I’m looking for ideas on how to bring the bottoms of the doors closer to the stand mainframe.

Thank You,
Trevor


15 replies so far

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

802 posts in 1277 days


#1 posted 06-01-2017 05:51 PM

A pic or two—or a sketch—would help a lot

Sounds like the center of gravity of your doors is off-center on the doors (maybe the wheel is in front of the door?)

Getting the wheels centered on the center of gravity would help the doors hang plumb—but a bottom guide would help, too.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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Loren

9624 posts in 3484 days


#2 posted 06-01-2017 07:27 PM

You could try magnets embedded in the bottoms
of the drawers and along the base of the case.

I think really though your best use of your time
is making another set of wheels that will hang
plumb. Since you’ve done it before it shouldn’t
be too much trouble to figure an improved design.

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tjbisme

19 posts in 202 days


#3 posted 06-02-2017 02:17 PM

I meant to upload images when I got home, but it slipped my mind. Here are the pictures of the stand.
I know a bottom guide would be the best way to keep the doors tight, but I was hoping to avoid that.
This is the front of the stand. (I need to work on my angles)

Here you can see the gap between the bottom part of the door and the stand.

These are the wheels I am using.

Here is a full side view of the doors.

I thought of using hidden magnets to help pull it closer to the stand, but I’m not sure what types of magnets to use to help keep it close, but not stick it to the stand. I think putting new wheels on will be the ticket because the ones I installed don’t roll real well and end up sliding as the doors are moved, thus removing the paint on the slider bar. Do you know where a good place would be to get wheels for cheap? I have checked Amazon and Menards and they are available there, but I was hoping for a greater selection. I’m just wondering if there is a website or store that someone knows of that has a wider selection.

Thanks,
Trevor

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Loren

9624 posts in 3484 days


#4 posted 06-02-2017 03:42 PM

You might try offsetting the wheels to be
centered over the door to see if that brings
the center of gravity in line.

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tjbisme

19 posts in 202 days


#5 posted 06-02-2017 04:14 PM

I see, so maybe add in some spacers between the wheel and the bracket to see if I can get the wheel to sit more in the middle of the door?

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

802 posts in 1277 days


#6 posted 06-02-2017 05:50 PM



I see, so maybe add in some spacers between the wheel and the bracket to see if I can get the wheel to sit more in the middle of the door?

- tjbisme


Yes, that would definitely help.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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Loren

9624 posts in 3484 days


#7 posted 06-02-2017 06:20 PM

In terms of wheels search for things like
“track roller bearings” on ebay.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1274 posts in 756 days


#8 posted 06-03-2017 02:51 PM

Tjbisme,

Here are some options that came to my little mind.

I agree that the doors are hung offset from the center of gravity. The rollers could be remounted so that the door hands plumb.

The center of gravity of the doors could also be changed by introducing the proper amount of mass to counterweight the inside of the door. This could be accomplished by epoxying some metal into holes bored into the lower inside face of the doors. Since lead is an available, very heavy, and soft metal, it would be a good choice. Lead flashing or slicing old school window sash weights are a couple of sources of the lead. Determining the proper mass could be done by taping differing amounts of metal to the inside face of the door until the doors hang plumb. Then this proper amount of metal can be removed and permanently installed in the same location where the weight was temporarily located.

The rollers could be remounted on the inside of the doors so the bottom of the doors would rub against the bottom of the cabinet. This could also require remounting the bar closer to the face of the cabinet. A stripe of UHMW slick tape could be installed on the bottom inside face of the doors where they rub against the lower face of the cabinet. The tape would reduce wear on the lower cabinet face. Another option would be to install a stand-off roller on the lower face of each door. The stand-off rollers would ride on the face of the lower portion of the cabinet and hold the doors plumb. In both cases the tape or stand-off rollers would not be visible.

If the above ideas are rejected, then a track is the only other way I can see to tame the misbehaving doors. A dado track could be installed horizontally that captures the doors.

If you have not already done so, browsing the window and door section at the home center might be worthwhile. There is a wide variety of replacement tracks and rollers for by-pass doors, sliding glass doors, and siding screen doors that might trigger some more ideas. I would think that high quality V shaped sliding glass rollers could be a good candidate for replacing the re-purposed pulleys. If the replacement rollers feature ball bearings in their construction, then I would think the doors would operate smoothly.

View sras's profile

sras

4663 posts in 2965 days


#9 posted 06-03-2017 03:50 PM

Definitely adjust the roller to be over the center of the doors.

1. Shorten the posts that hold the track.
2. Mover the rollers to the center of the doors.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

802 posts in 1277 days


#10 posted 06-03-2017 06:56 PM


The center of gravity of the doors could also be changed by introducing the proper amount of mass to counterweight the inside of the door.
- – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – -
- JBrow

Be careful if you are considering this—- the weight would need to be added to the FRONT of the door

This is the real answer:


Definitely adjust the roller to be over the center of the doors.

1. Shorten the posts that hold the track.
2. Mover the rollers to the center of the doors.

- sras

but some sort of “rub rail”, roller, track, or guide would be advisable for the bottom in order to avoid wear.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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JBrow

1274 posts in 756 days


#11 posted 06-04-2017 02:25 AM

Tjbisme,

Yeap, jerryminer knows physics better than I. He is correct that the counterweight idea would require placing the weights toward the outside of the door; not the inside as I previously stated. Sorry for any confusion I may have introduced.

While perhaps enough weight could be inserted into the bottom edge of the doors, biased toward the front, it would be tricky. If the wife does not like the track idea, I doubt she would go for some weights mounted on the front of the doors.

View Bumpy's profile

Bumpy

31 posts in 317 days


#12 posted 06-04-2017 10:48 AM

I also build my own sliding barn door hardware for cabinets. You can make or purchase (Home Depot) a floor guide. Just cut a run the door on the table saw (3/16×1 deep). This holds the door perfectly and it is not seen.

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

384 posts in 218 days


#13 posted 06-04-2017 11:03 AM

This. Space out the pulleys from the bracket.


You might try offsetting the wheels to be
centered over the door to see if that brings
the center of gravity in line.

- Loren


View tjbisme's profile

tjbisme

19 posts in 202 days


#14 posted 06-05-2017 05:27 PM

Thank you everyone for your responses. I ordered some track roller wheels from Ebay and they should be here sometime this week. Once I get those switched out, I’ll add some spacers and see if I can get the wheels closer to the center of the doors.

Just to make sure I’m getting this right, if re-positioning the wheels doesn’t do the trick, adding some weights to the underside of the doors toward the face of the door, can help get the doors closer to stand?

Thanks again,
Trevor

View tjbisme's profile

tjbisme

19 posts in 202 days


#15 posted 06-09-2017 01:42 PM

You guys are geniuses! Once I installed the new wheels and added more spacing between the mounting bracket and the wheel, the door hung plumb. The new wheels are also much better for sliding the doors along the bracket. I guess I should have just spent the money the first go round, trying to get by cheap always ends up biting you in the end.

Thanks again everyone,
Trevor

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