LumberJocks

A Saw, is a Saw, is a Saw.....or is it??

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by nmkidd posted 1237 days ago 1699 views 2 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View nmkidd's profile

nmkidd

758 posts in 1671 days


1237 days ago

OK…....I’m perplexed!!!!.........whilst in the porcelain reading room….....perusing catalogs….........I find there

are portable table saws…......contractor saws…..........cabinet saws…............and …........... hybrid saws!!!

What the heck is a hybrid saw?????

Someone please enlighten me

thx

Everyone have a Great Thanksgiving!!!!

-- Doug, New Mexico.......the only stupid question is one that is never asked!........don't fix it, if it ain't broke!


10 replies so far

View jmichaeldesign's profile

jmichaeldesign

66 posts in 1281 days


#1 posted 1237 days ago

Portable saws have small aluminum tables and universal motors. Universal motors are lighter than inductions motors of the same power, but they are much, much louder. The cheap portable saws are useless for woodworking as far as I’m concerned. They might get the job done, but they just won’t have the repeatable precision of a full size saw. Their claims of horsepower are often over-rated.

Contractors saws were considered to be portable many years ago. The motor hangs off the back of the saw and is easily removed to lighten the load if you need to move it in and out of a truck. Not fun but doable. Contractors saws have cast iron tops, and may have cast iron wings (the left and right sides of a top). More often they have stamped steel wings. They are usually 1-1/2hp which will get the job done, but can be a bit underpowered for ripping thick pieces of hardwoods. They are the same size as cabinet saws but much lighter. On table saws weight is a good thing. It stops any vibrations which can create inaccuracy. Some contractors saws come with fences that aren’t much better than those on portable saws. Cheaper fences lock into place at the front and back of the saw, this often makes it hard to set the fence parallel to the blade every time. Nicer fences are built much beefier so that they can lock along only the front rail of the saw and have the strength not to deflect at the back of the saw when under normal pressure.

Cabinet saws have the motor inside the cabinet and have full cast iron tops (typically). The trunnions (holds the motor and arbor in place, allows the saw blade to tilt) and the arbor (the shat the blade bolts onto) are much heavier than on contractors saws resulting in higher quality cuts. Some older cabinet saws have fences that lock in front and back, but any new saw will have a good fence that locks only in front. Cabinet saws start at 3hp motors which require you to have a 220v circuit for the motor. If you can afford it, a cabinet saw is the way to go.

Hybrid saws combine contractors saws and cabinet saws. They use the smaller motor of a contractor saw, so you can run it on 110v, they are usually 1-1/2 to 2 hp. The motor is also mounted inside the cabinet of the saw. A closed cabinet helps a lot with dust collection. Hybrid saws are a great option if you want some of the features of a cabinet saw without needing to have a dedicated 220v circuit put in your shop.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5137 posts in 1873 days


#2 posted 1237 days ago

Bench top saw (on legstand):

Portable jobsite saw (on legstand):

Conventional contractor saw (front & rear view):

Hybrid saw (front & rear view):

Industrial cabinet saw:

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View patron's profile

patron

12831 posts in 1839 days


#3 posted 1237 days ago

ask
and ye shall
find out

thanks guys
as i work with doug
allot
i saw this coming days ago lol

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View nmkidd's profile

nmkidd

758 posts in 1671 days


#4 posted 1234 days ago

Thanks to all for their inputs!!!

-- Doug, New Mexico.......the only stupid question is one that is never asked!........don't fix it, if it ain't broke!

View ferstler's profile

ferstler

326 posts in 2018 days


#5 posted 1217 days ago

jmichaeldesign says that jobsite saws are useless for woodworking.

OK, that may be the case for some kinds of work, especially those involving precision repeatable high quality cuts. However, in the old, pre-electric days fine woodworking was done by individuals who did not use power tools at all. One can only imagine how those guys would have loved to be able to use a jobsite saw for some of their work. Yes, a superb cabinet saw may allow the user to do some very nice things. However, I think that hobby enthusiasts on a budget or with little in the way of large-shop space can get away with using some kind of bench-top or folding jobsite saw for some pretty good results, particularly if they have other tools on hand (jointer, planer, band saw, benchtop sander, etc.) that will let them refine their initial table-saw cuts to a point of decent precision. Also, some enthusiasts (those who like to do work with band saws or scroll saws) may only care to make fairly small items, and for that a small table saw might work just fine for the initial cuts.

Some woodworkers have a bad habit of flaunting their collection of super-duper tools that are located in a spacious shop or basement. Fine. Enjoy the tools. However, the bottom line is the quality of work produced within a certain project category, and some guys here almost certainly have produced some very fine works with low-cost tools, including low-cost table saws.

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

2466 posts in 1274 days


#6 posted 1217 days ago

I do quite well with a contractor saw, I had a bench type saw and it had a hard time with 3/4 cherry flooring – burned out the motor – twice, blade is like new. The contractor saw that I bought after the second motor died is a Rigid, with cast iron wings. Wish I had the Beysmeyer fence option but I don’t. The additional weight of the cast iron wings makes a serious improvement. Setting and adjusting took time but I have been pleased. One more thing, I have found that I also enjoy using my handsaws, now that I figured out how to sharpen them – repeatedly. For some jobs, like my floor that I put in and cutting larger sheet stock, I couldn’t have done it without a clean and smooth cut, and the Rigid has performed.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View Loren's profile

Loren

6734 posts in 2146 days


#7 posted 1217 days ago

The way the motor hangs off the back of a contractor’s saw puts
angled sideways pressure on the trunnions when the blade is
tilted, which always caused the blade to heel. This makes them
a frustrating tool for cutting compound joinery and ripped miters.

The hybrid saws have the motor hanging beneath the blade, so
when it’s tilted the weight is more or less evenly distributed on
the trunnions so the blade will be less prone to heeling.

The cabinet saws usually are pretty similar to the hybrid saws but
tend to be built beefier.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5137 posts in 1873 days


#8 posted 1217 days ago

Charlie – I’m sure with good technique you can get good results from a SCMS, but I don’t see how they can be more accurate than a good TS. The way the whole mechanism cantilevers from a pivot point makes them very prone to far more play than a TS….I’d bet they can move upwards of an 1/8” pretty easily. My CMS doesn’t even have the sliding feature and it’s not as accurate as my TS. My TS has a huge cast iron swing arm that the arbor is mounted too and spins with very limited runout….a good miter gauge helps me dial in precise angles and helps with repeatability of 90° cuts. The screaming universal motors on the CMS/SCMS alone are enough to prompt me to turn to be trusty quiet TS first…I’ll only use my CMS for really long pieces that the TS doesn’t handle well.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View jmichaeldesign's profile

jmichaeldesign

66 posts in 1281 days


#9 posted 1217 days ago

In the cabinet shop I worked in we crosscut almost all of our parts on the table saw. With a stop block on the fence, and a good crosscut sled it provides better repeatability than a miter saw.

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

2466 posts in 1274 days


#10 posted 1216 days ago

About the only thing I use the miter saw for are the compound cuts for crown molding and I am having second thoughts on that. If I am not doing the cut by hand, the tablesaw, then bandsaw wins. If I have time, I will make a jig for the tablesaw for crown moldings.

-- David in Damascus, MD

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase