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Forum topic by nmssis posted 05-30-2017 04:02 PM 561 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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nmssis

139 posts in 824 days


05-30-2017 04:02 PM

Topic tags/keywords: sharpening question trick

can anyone provide advise of what makes saws, either rip or cross, to lock up or bind in while sawing?

is there a checklist of troubleshooting?

thanks

-- Learn something new everyday!


13 replies so far

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17031 posts in 2845 days


#1 posted 05-30-2017 04:18 PM

Not enough set to the teeth will bind you up because the saw dust has no where to escape and you clog up the teeth.

A wavy plate or tension in the board will do it too.

Have you tried waxing the plate of the saw or driving some small wedges in the kerf as you cut?

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

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nmssis

139 posts in 824 days


#2 posted 05-30-2017 04:34 PM


Not enough set to the teeth will bind you up because the saw dust has no where to escape and you clog up the teeth.

A wavy plate or tension in the board will do it too.

Have you tried waxing the plate of the saw or driving some small wedges in the kerf as you cut?

- chrisstef

the saws are straight as far as I can see…
did sharpened the teeth on both…although my skills on sharpening might be in doubt,
have not done the saw set, cause don’t have the tool yet. found this on Amazon

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002YQRZ6/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_3?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A48G055ISBKT2

I did lube the sides of the blades but seem not too much help.

-- Learn something new everyday!

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4480 posts in 2190 days


#3 posted 05-30-2017 05:14 PM

Sometimes board tension can cause a saw to bind especially when ripping. It can even happen on the table saw.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

981 posts in 430 days


#4 posted 05-30-2017 05:54 PM

For crosscuts if the offcut piece does not hang freely but is supported even a slight bit higher than the place of cut it will pinch the saw.

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nmssis

139 posts in 824 days


#5 posted 05-30-2017 06:03 PM



Sometimes board tension can cause a saw to bind especially when ripping. It can even happen on the table saw.

- bondogaposis

what if it for cross cutting? might it be the set on the teeth?

-- Learn something new everyday!

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bondogaposis

4480 posts in 2190 days


#6 posted 05-30-2017 06:40 PM

what if it for cross cutting? might it be the set on the teeth?

Quite likely.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

18633 posts in 2522 days


#7 posted 05-30-2017 06:48 PM

IF you are holding the one end of the board a little higher than the other part of the board, it will bind…..same as cutting a , let’s say, a 2×4 between two sawhorses with a circular saw….you WILL be eating than circular saw as it kicks back at you.

Allow for the end to droop a bit, as you crosscut. End of the board can drop a little bit, and there will be no binding going on.

Long rips, with contrary wood….have a small nail or screw handy. after rip sawing a little ways, put the nail/screw in the kerf, to keep it from closing back up on the saw, causing a bind.

Keep a plain, old candle handy, rub the saw plate with the candle before you start the cuts, repeat as needed.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1789 posts in 486 days


#8 posted 05-30-2017 06:55 PM

I agree with all of the above … not enough set, twist in the board, and also not keeping the saw square as you cut.
 

 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17031 posts in 2845 days


#9 posted 05-30-2017 07:34 PM

If you haven’t watched LJ Brit’s video on saw sharpening I highly, highly suggest it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-_MF2Mnxwc

Crosscutting involves severing the fibers unlike rip sawing which “chisels” the fibers. If you filed your crosscut saw at 90 degrees to the plate you may not have enough fleam left to sever the fibers. Fleam is where you see the teeth come to a knife point.

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View Tim's profile

Tim

3683 posts in 1800 days


#10 posted 05-30-2017 07:49 PM

Agree with all the above, also putting too much downward force on the teeth into the wood can cause it to bind. Try the old “let the saw do the work” advice by not pressing into the wood until you find a rhythm that doesn’t bind. When the saw is well sharpened, set, etc and your skills are good you can actually put a fair amount of pressure on it but lightening up the pressure will help for now.

I’ve not used that saw set you linked, but it gets some bad reviews for quality. The Somax sets seem better, but they cost quite a bit more too. The only knock on their quality is the hammer is a little soft and will wear faster than if it were hardened better, but you’d have to sharpen a lot of saws to find that out. Too bad I have some extra saw sets, but I haven’t gotten any of them tuned up or I could get one out to you.

View nmssis's profile

nmssis

139 posts in 824 days


#11 posted 05-30-2017 07:59 PM



Agree with all the above, also putting too much downward force on the teeth into the wood can cause it to bind. Try the old “let the saw do the work” advice by not pressing into the wood until you find a rhythm that doesn t bind. When the saw is well sharpened, set, etc and your skills are good you can actually put a fair amount of pressure on it but lightening up the pressure will help for now.

I ve not used that saw set you linked, but it gets some bad reviews for quality. The Somax sets seem better, but they cost quite a bit more too. The only knock on their quality is the hammer is a little soft and will wear faster than if it were hardened better, but you d have to sharpen a lot of saws to find that out. Too bad I have some extra saw sets, but I haven t gotten any of them tuned up or I could get one out to you.

- Tim

Appreciate the thought!

Just moved into a new home and finally have some space to do small work and run into something so basic…or I thought it was, but thanks for all the advice. it’s priceless!!

Thanks, everyone!

-- Learn something new everyday!

View nmssis's profile

nmssis

139 posts in 824 days


#12 posted 05-31-2017 01:36 AM



If you haven t watched LJ Brit s video on saw sharpening I highly, highly suggest it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-_MF2Mnxwc

Crosscutting involves severing the fibers unlike rip sawing which “chisels” the fibers. If you filed your crosscut saw at 90 degrees to the plate you may not have enough fleam left to sever the fibers. Fleam is where you see the teeth come to a knife point.

- chrisstef

thanks for the link…wow that was comprehensive

-- Learn something new everyday!

View nmssis's profile

nmssis

139 posts in 824 days


#13 posted 06-01-2017 03:15 PM

Feedback: Simply applying some of the techniques on this thread, I was able to rip down with much greater ease…and far straighter cut.

Thanks to all!!

-- Learn something new everyday!

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