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Disappointed in Freud Glue Line Rip

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Forum topic by Rick_M posted 05-30-2017 03:47 AM 3632 views 2 times favorited 91 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rick_M

10612 posts in 2215 days


05-30-2017 03:47 AM

Topic tags/keywords: lm74r010 freud glue line

LM74R010 Glue Line Ripping Circular Saw Ripping Saw Blade 10” x 5/8” Bore x 30 Tooth
This Freud blade’s specially designed triple-chip tooth design produces extremely smooth, true surfaces for gluing and finish work. There is no need for sanding or jointing after the cut.
.
.
Used it for the first time today and I’m unhappy with the cut quality. It is far from smooth or glue ready. I’m getting crosshatching, scalloping, and rough edges. I will be returning this blade and trying something else. Also have a Freud Fusion that crosscuts glass smooth and rips well enough for gluing but I bought this blade on sale to take the brunt of ripping duty and to make flat bottom cuts.

I took pictures but it’s hard to see. White oak, but I tried maple and got the same result.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/


91 replies so far

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

9612 posts in 3483 days


#1 posted 05-30-2017 04:16 AM

Try a blade stabilizer.

I used a Forrest blade reputed to rip glue
lines in the past and it performed best
using stabilizers.

In professional work, tolerances for glue
lines vary. A jointed line is the finest
but honestly glue does fill gaps to greater
or lesser extent.

You may want to try accessories like
Board Buddies as well as stabilizers in
pursuit of better glue line rips.

View Rich's profile

Rich

1977 posts in 424 days


#2 posted 05-30-2017 04:41 AM

Agree with Loren. I mentioned it in another post on some thread or another, but I have always used my Forrest stabilizer with great results, regardless of the brand of blade. The reality set in when I had to remove it to get a greater blade height for a thick board crosscut. I left it off out of laziness until I realized my zero kerf slot in my crosscut sled was widened — and not evenly. They really do work. BTW, tossed the sled.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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DirtyMike

637 posts in 737 days


#3 posted 05-30-2017 04:47 AM

Rick, I would also expect better rips than that from a glue line blade. Have you hit it with a dial indicator yet? I have bought 2 Frued blades this year that i have already returned. one had a wonky arbor hole. the other (diablo) was made in china not italy as advertised and it looked terrible.

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bruc101

1197 posts in 3377 days


#4 posted 05-30-2017 05:30 AM

I’ve been using the Frued Glue Line rip blade since it was first introduced. I’ve never had any problems with it and use it on a daily basis.It’s my go to blade for just about everything other than plywood and solid surface material.

Everyone woodworker I personally know also uses the blade without any issues. I always keep a new spare one ready to go.

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org

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pintodeluxe

5459 posts in 2648 days


#5 posted 05-30-2017 05:51 AM

You had good luck with the fusion blade, so that tells me your TS setup and technique are sound.
I do wonder if the white oak was moving or releasing tension on you. Try some different lumber before you give up on it.

I use the LU86 40 tooth combination blade with good results. I mill white oak more than any other wood with it. Works great.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Rick_M

10612 posts in 2215 days


#6 posted 05-30-2017 06:59 AM

re: stabilizers – I’ve never needed stabilizers before. I currently own 5 Freud blades and a few other brands. Maybe it’s the saw but I’m going to try another brand of blade first and see how it goes. My satisfaction with Freud has been waning.


Have you hit it with a dial indicator yet?
- DirtyMike

Not yet. I’m in the middle of a new vanity for the bath and didn’t want to stop to fool around with blades.


Try some different lumber before you give up on it.
- pintodeluxe

I cut some red maple that’s been in the shop for 10 years, same result.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Redoak49

2890 posts in 1823 days


#7 posted 05-30-2017 10:49 AM

I am surprised at your result. I have that blade and it works fine for me.

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HokieKen

4510 posts in 973 days


#8 posted 05-30-2017 11:04 AM

Yeah, I think you probably just got a bad blade Rick. I have a glue line rip I use for the bulk of my ripping and it works great. I will say that I think I get better cut quality if I raise the blade a little higher than I normally would. I normally set the blade so the bottom of the gullet is at the top of the wood. For my rip cuts though, I raise it another 1/4” or so. Don’t know why that’s the case and it’s probably just a peculiarity of my saw but thought I’d throw it out there.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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EricTwice

228 posts in 368 days


#9 posted 05-30-2017 11:17 AM

Check the teeth to make sure that one is not bent slightly. check the blade for warp.

-- nice recovery, They should pay extra for that mistake, Eric E.

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Craftsman on the lake

2708 posts in 3272 days


#10 posted 05-30-2017 11:29 AM

I’ve been using the freud Ice rip blade. It’s not a thin one though. Thick heavy teeth that take out a bit of wood with the cut. And it’s not super smooth like your blade, but it cuts so good and the edge is more than fine for a good glue-up. I don’t joint the edge after. And those huge teeth. Well, I recently had it sharpened at Rocklers, and I expect to sharpen it many more times before they sharpen down too much.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7784 posts in 3210 days


#11 posted 05-30-2017 01:15 PM

Probably defective, but regardless, the LM74 has a triple chip grind and won’t leave a flat bottom. You need a Flat Top Grind (FTG) for flat bottoms….LM72, Infinity 010-024, etc.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2710 posts in 1315 days


#12 posted 05-30-2017 01:17 PM

I have that blade and have to say its by far the best rip blade I’ve ever used.

While you certainly can get a bad blade, I’ve had such good luck with Freud, I would check my saw first.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2953 posts in 547 days


#13 posted 05-30-2017 01:37 PM



I ve been using the Frued Glue Line rip blade since it was first introduced. I ve never had any problems with it and use it on a daily basis.It s my go to blade for just about everything other than plywood and solid surface material.

Everyone woodworker I personally know also uses the blade without any issues. I always keep a new spare one ready to go.

- bruc101


I am surprised at your result. I have that blade and it works fine for me.

- Redoak49


I have that blade and have to say its by far the best rip blade I ve ever used.

While you certainly can get a bad blade, I ve had such good luck with Freud, I would check my saw first.

- rwe2156

DITTO ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1565 days


#14 posted 05-30-2017 02:49 PM

LM74R010 Glue Line Ripping Circular Saw Ripping Saw Blade 10” x 5/8” Bore x 30 Tooth
This Freud blade s specially designed triple-chip tooth design produces extremely smooth, true surfaces for gluing and finish work. There is no need for sanding or jointing after the cut.
- Rick M

I personally have never heard of anyone sanding a saw cut edge before gluing. I just doesn’t make any sense as no matter how purrfect one might think of themselves, that nice flat surface and parallel piece your saw just gave you goes right out the window. And, why would anyone joint an edge to make it smooth for glue?

Do all you folks allow extra width to be able to make that edge smooth? Are all your jointers so purrfect as to keep your boards absolutely parallel?

It’s a known fact especially in painting and in Formica type materials you must scuff the surfaces for the materials to adhere better….. A saw cut that is clean should fit that criteria for gluing. Someone please enlighten me.

For 40 years, I have never used anything other than my table saw, glue, and clamps to glue my work. I worked at a office furniture establishment in California back in ‘78. The oak lumber went through a straight line for width, and then cross cut to 1” longer than final length. After that, straight to the glue station. This was a nationally know furniture manufacturer that made high quality products. I don’t think they even had a jointer in the place. .... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5459 posts in 2648 days


#15 posted 05-30-2017 03:14 PM

I personally have never heard of anyone sanding a saw cut edge before gluing. I just doesn t make any sense as no matter how purrfect one might think of themselves, that nice flat surface and parallel piece your saw just gave you goes right out the window. And, why would anyone joint an edge to make it smooth for glue?

Do all you folks allow extra width to be able to make that edge smooth? Are all your jointers so purrfect as to keep your boards absolutely parallel?

It s a known fact especially in painting and in Formica type materials you must scuff the surfaces for the materials to adhere better….. A saw cut that is clean should fit that criteria for gluing. Someone please enlighten me.

For 40 years, I have never used anything other than my table saw, glue, and clamps to glue my work. I worked at a office furniture establishment in California back in 78. The oak lumber went through a straight line for width, and then cross cut to 1” longer than final length. After that, straight to the glue station. This was a nationally know furniture manufacturer that made high quality products. I don t think they even had a jointer in the place. .... Jerry (in Tucson)

- Nubsnstubs

Agreed, I would not sand edges before panel glueup.
I think what Freud marketing was getting at is this… a glue line rip doesn’t need the additional cleanup that a standard 24 tooth rip blade might.

I personally joint all boards with opposing passes before glueups. In other words one board is edge jointed with the face away from the fence, and the adjoining board is jointed with the face toward the fence. It helps me get flat panels, and cancels out any error in the fence setting (ie if not perfectly 90 degrees).

If you can get good flat panels straight off the tablesaw, I see nothing wrong with that technique.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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