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need a scraper which one

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Forum topic by Karda posted 05-28-2017 11:29 PM 1057 views 0 times favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

814 posts in 391 days


05-28-2017 11:29 PM

I just finished my first bowl but it is rough and the bottom is hard to get at do I need a scraper and which one there are so many and I don’t know which one are specialty tools only used by pros. Here is a picture of the bowl it 5.5 wide and 2.5 deep on the outside


28 replies so far

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3205 days


#1 posted 05-28-2017 11:56 PM

I can’t help with this one, I’ve never used a scraper. I make sure my tools are sharp and them sand my pieces while still on the lathe.

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them700project

115 posts in 855 days


#2 posted 05-29-2017 01:08 AM

I am new to scrapers but I would pick up a set of curved scrapers. I would try and stick with a name brand like lee valley. I heard that there is a difference. You will also need a burnisher to put the edge on it and a file to take off work hardened metal after a while. If you have a long socket extension this can be used instead of a dedicated burnisher. check out youtube there are some videos on the subject

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Andre

1493 posts in 1643 days


#3 posted 05-29-2017 02:33 AM

Check out www.bearkatwood.com here on L.J.s for a curved one! Lee Valley has a great selection, I really like there mini ones!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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Karda

814 posts in 391 days


#4 posted 05-29-2017 04:16 AM

The first video I looked at the turner explained 6 8 different kinds of scraper and turned a very large bowl with just a scraper. I’m confused is it something I need or not. The bowl I turned is glued 2×8s the side grain isn’t to rough but even sanding didn’t smooth the end grain much. so far what I have been doing is using my spindle or roughing ouge and smoothing with my skew but I can’t do that with a bowl

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Wildwood

2186 posts in 1971 days


#5 posted 05-29-2017 10:48 AM

For the style of pine bowl you turned would use my heavy scraper, biggest reason is amount of tool over the tool rest 1/4” scraper not enough.

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Category_Code=tools-pkrd-hdbs

To learn about scrapers parts 1 & 2 nice to know info!

http://www.docgreenwoodturner.com/scrapers1.html

Pine not always the easiest wood to turn because dealing with both early & late wood and tool has to move a little slower over the wood to keep from bouncing for lack of a better word.

Some folk prefer to put a double bevel on their bowl gouge for deep bottom bowls to avoid what you describe and or avoiding scratches cannot sand away.

-- Bill

View Karda's profile

Karda

814 posts in 391 days


#6 posted 05-29-2017 03:11 PM

its not pine its fir but I am having a hard time finding wood and I bought a 2×8 so I could turn. the first wood i turned was some green maple that was nice.

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hairy

2586 posts in 3369 days


#7 posted 05-29-2017 03:33 PM

Scrapers are the easiest turning tools to make.

I use a skew, flat side on the tool rest as a scraper.

-- My reality check bounced...

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Karda

814 posts in 391 days


#8 posted 05-29-2017 03:36 PM

can you use a skew for inside scraping, the bottom and the sides are what really need it. I’ll have to up the speed on the lathe , I don’t know how to get my tools sharper

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hairy

2586 posts in 3369 days


#9 posted 05-29-2017 06:12 PM

I wouldn’t try that. I like a half round scraper with the edge on the left and front for inside. A scraper can be ground to what shape you need.

-- My reality check bounced...

View clarkt's profile

clarkt

4 posts in 199 days


#10 posted 05-29-2017 06:24 PM

I have been turning just this sort of bowl for a couple years now. I didn’t have a lot to invest in tools to start out, but I bought the HSS hollowing tool system from PSI and I use it constantly. It is good quality. It is steel, so you’ll have to hone once in a while, but just the top flat of the cutters. quick and easy. There are 6 scraper cutters, and you can get replacements. I don’t usually plug products, but this tool is a decent one. To smooth the end grain, a scraper is probably best and safest, but you’re best bet is high speed and very light cuts to eliminate the “fuzz” on soft woods like this fir.

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Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1567 days


#11 posted 05-29-2017 06:43 PM

if you’re in to making your own tools, I’m pretty sure you can find a leaf spring somewhere in that town you live in. Get it, and shape it to the shape you want. ........ Piece of cake…....... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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papadan

3584 posts in 3205 days


#12 posted 05-29-2017 06:51 PM

Construction lumber is too soft for turning. You will need tools sharp enough to shave with to even get close to a smooth finish on end grain. Pine/fir/construction lumber is nice to practice on but not for fine finishing.

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Karda

814 posts in 391 days


#13 posted 05-29-2017 08:55 PM

ok thanks

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Karda

814 posts in 391 days


#14 posted 05-30-2017 12:05 AM

Missed the last couple posts. i know construction lumber is not the best I would prefer a nice hardwood but until then I got to turn something. I saw a video about turning 2x bowls and thought id try it. fuzzing is not the big problem. When I turn the bottom as I work down the side the gouge won’t cut so my sides tapper in. I watched the video Jerry suggested and I can do what he does at that point but to do it I have to remove the tail stock and work from the back of the lathe. In robohippys video his handle remains more or less parallel with the rails here is a picture of the inside of the bowl. Could may edge angle be wrong its about 42 degrees

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LeeMills

459 posts in 1138 days


#15 posted 05-30-2017 12:33 AM

You don’t need a scraper for bowls but sometimes they help. The steep walls and flat bottom you show makes using a gouge much more difficult. For the inside you would want a radiused one and for the outside a straight (usually skew shap) one. They would not be presented flat but at a sheer angle to remove very small bit of wood to clear torn end grain or tool marks. For bowl practice I would glue up blanks and try for a catenary curve starting shallow (like a wok) practicing a complete curve before trying deeper bowls. Maybe two 2X8 or 2X10 sections.
Constructing timber is difficult but if you can get a good cut on it then most everything else is much easier.

If your gouge is 42 then you probably can not make the turn from the side to the bottom and maintain bevel support. “Bottom feeders” may have an angle up to 65-70. 42 would be a good angle for general bowl turning.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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