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End grain walnut finishing

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Forum topic by maxhall posted 05-28-2017 12:06 PM 554 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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maxhall

75 posts in 2034 days


05-28-2017 12:06 PM

Making a light for a friend’s kid (birthday present) modeled after the Darbin Orvar fairy light. I used a ROS to 220 grit, then put a piece of 220 grit down on my outfeed table and sanded with the grain prior to the 1st coat. Using Arm R Seal Semi Satin (1st time using Arm R Seal). So far I’ve done 3 coats waiting 24 hrs in between, lightly sanding with 600grit between coats and then wiping clean with mineral spirits prior to adding an additional coat. I think the sides look pretty good but the top looks pretty poor. I know my friend won’t care but I would prefer to have it look as seamless as the edge grain if thats possible.


7 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3828 posts in 1601 days


#1 posted 05-28-2017 01:55 PM

I would have sealed it before but at this point additional coats will be needed. The end grain is absorbing the wax.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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maxhall

75 posts in 2034 days


#2 posted 05-28-2017 02:03 PM



I would have sealed it before but at this point additional coats will be needed. The end grain is absorbing the wax.

- mahdee

I was concerned if I sealed the end grain with something (probably shellac from what I’ve just read), I wouldn’t have the same color on the end grain that I do on the long grain. So at this point I guess I’ve committed myself to multiple coats until it stops absorbing.

View KnickKnack's profile

KnickKnack

1087 posts in 3399 days


#3 posted 05-28-2017 03:24 PM

When you say “one coat” – do you mean just that? A single coat of finish, then let it dry etc etc?
I too like the end grain to have a somewhat similar finish to the “flat” wood.
I’ve never used “Arm R Seal” (not available here), but with oils and varnishes I just keep adding very thin coats of finish until it either stops absorbing, or starts to get sticky. Be careful when you get to the rub-down – it may take longer than 24 hours to harden up.

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1421 posts in 1823 days


#4 posted 05-28-2017 03:35 PM

This is to control blotching, conditioning the wood, but will work well for sealing end grain also. Can condition the entire piece then topcoat to get even absorption. For this project just keep adding ars coats.

View Loren's profile

Loren

9602 posts in 3481 days


#5 posted 05-28-2017 07:55 PM

It looks like what I call “fog” on the end
grain. I’ve dealt with it a fair amount
on walnut. More hand sanding is the
remedy I’ve found to work.

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maxhall

75 posts in 2034 days


#6 posted 05-28-2017 08:12 PM



It looks like what I call “fog” on the end
grain. I ve dealt with it a fair amount
on walnut. More hand sanding is the
remedy I ve found to work.

- Loren

What grit would you sand to?

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Loren

9602 posts in 3481 days


#7 posted 05-28-2017 10:23 PM

220, or 320 if necessary.

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