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Forum topic by Valkiera posted 05-28-2017 10:10 AM 964 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Valkiera

9 posts in 1570 days


05-28-2017 10:10 AM

So my space is an unattached, unheated, single care garage. I’m the Pacific Northwest, on the damp side of the state. Amazingly so far I’ve not had a huge issue with rust, what I’m having an issue with is my wood always feels damp. And it gets chilly in the shop in the winter, though tolerable 90% of the time.

Would insulating the walls and adding a wood floor over the cement help, or am I also going to need to add a heat source too?


21 replies so far

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

607 posts in 2186 days


#1 posted 05-28-2017 11:32 AM

When we lived in Eugene, I used the garage as a part time shop. The walls were finished and insulated. ON Saturday morning, I would pull the cars out of the garage, set up my power tools (all on rollers) and then plug in a 110V electric space heater I bought at Jerry’s. Then, I’d get some breakfast and soon after head out to the shop where it was usually a tolerable 60 deg or so. I never worried about the floor as the condensation evaporated as the temperature rose. The heat generated by the various motors on my equipment also helped with the temperature.

If you are worried about your wood holding moisture, look for a 240V unit that has a thermostat. I use one here in the Midwest (IA) during the winter to keep the temperature reasonable. I also use an A/C in the summer to keep the humidity down (and keep me cooler).

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4758 posts in 2331 days


#2 posted 05-28-2017 12:37 PM

I think Earl has a very good approach. If you insulate and find a you need heat, the 120V space heater is an easy to add solution.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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RobS888

2316 posts in 1682 days


#3 posted 05-28-2017 01:38 PM

I have a dehumidifier that keeps my garage dry and warm.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View jonah's profile

jonah

1467 posts in 3136 days


#4 posted 05-28-2017 01:49 PM

If you insulate properly, you won’t need much of a heater. A small one will make a surprising dent in the cold.

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Carloz

977 posts in 429 days


#5 posted 05-28-2017 02:27 PM

What about one of those Bosch/Dewalt heated jackets?
Electric heaters with exception of fully sealed oil heaters in the woodshop is a recepy for disaster.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4478 posts in 2189 days


#6 posted 05-28-2017 02:33 PM

Personally I hate working in an unheated shop. Glue and finish problems are common. Neither machines nor humans work well in cold environments. Wood movement problems are common as well, when you bring that project inside to a warm and dry environment. One of the big advantages of heating is that it lowers the humidity. Insulate and heat, and your shop time will be much more enjoyable. Consider that the best time of year to pursue this hobby is in the winter.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2782 days


#7 posted 05-28-2017 03:44 PM

I lived in Pacific Beach, Washington, and my little shop was uninsulated and unheated, but it only took a little care to keep things in good shape.

Like you, the problem I did have was getting moisture content down. I had cedar blocks that, after four years of drying, were still dripping wet in the middle. I didn’t have a lot of problem with wood picking up moisture, however. To be safe, I did store wood that, once part of a project, would be inside in the basement (my dehumidifier was a wood burning stove).

If I bought the wood at the moisture content I wanted, I just went for it. Otherwise, I figured a month inside would alter thin boards (1”) and a little longer for 2x.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3655 posts in 2147 days


#8 posted 05-28-2017 04:54 PM



Personally I hate working in an unheated shop. Glue and finish problems are common. Neither machines nor humans work well in cold environments. Wood movement problems are common as well, when you bring that project inside to a warm and dry environment. One of the big advantages of heating is that it lowers the humidity. Insulate and heat, and your shop time will be much more enjoyable. Consider that the best time of year to pursue this hobby is in the winter.

- bondogaposis

I pretty much agree with you but living in Alaska for over 44 years I’ve found that most machine do pretty well in the cold.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Arlin Eastman's profile

Arlin Eastman

4040 posts in 2399 days


#9 posted 05-28-2017 05:02 PM

I have both a dehumidifier and a space heater in my garage. The dehumidifier is plumed with a hose to go outside to drain and the heater is one that the temp can be set and left and will turn to whatever I set it to like 55 and before I go out I set it to 65.

I know for sure the Dehumidifier will get out the moisture.

-- Please help me help other Vets click..> http://www.gofundme.com/m1abko.....It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

View Valkiera's profile

Valkiera

9 posts in 1570 days


#10 posted 05-28-2017 05:14 PM

Thanks everyone, I’m in Western Washington and it can get very damp for extended times. My current plan is that the garage will be for breaking down lumber before it comes into the indoor “shop” (spare bedroom with hand tools mainly). I was hoping to store wood in the garage and have a chance for it to dry a bit, so far I’ve not found that to be true.

I’ll spend the summer getting it insulated and arranged into a working configuration. Then take the advice of trying a 110v heater and see how things go.

Really appreciate you all taking the time to give me your thoughts.

Val

View mudflap4869's profile

mudflap4869

1512 posts in 1297 days


#11 posted 05-28-2017 06:05 PM

Keep a box fan going in your wood storage area. Allow the building to vent. Motionless air cannot wick the moisture out of the wood.

-- Still trying to master kindling making

View hairy's profile

hairy

2586 posts in 3370 days


#12 posted 05-28-2017 07:39 PM

Light fixtures put out more heat than light. You need shop lights. Just a thought…

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Designers-Edge-2-Light-1-000-Watt-Halogen-Stand-Work-Light/50095118

-- My reality check bounced...

View Just_Iain's profile

Just_Iain

228 posts in 254 days


#13 posted 05-28-2017 07:44 PM

Do a full ‘Brit’ and store your lumber under furniture such as the couch and beds. Ideally, material and the furniture you build from it should be acclimatized to the building where you are going to use.

-- For those about to die, remember your bicycle helmet!

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

550 posts in 441 days


#14 posted 05-28-2017 08:11 PM

Snohomish County resident here.

As far as the wood goes I never really had that issue. Is the wood damp or does the surface just feel damp? The latter is not an issue. It’s just condensation.

Here’s a $65 no work solution that works for me.

As far as warmth I use one of those propane worksite heaters. https://www.lowes.com/pd/Dyna-Glo-25-000-BTU-Portable-Convection-Propane-Heater/3772625 Even on the coldest of days that thing will heat up the shop like a sauna. I let it get pretty warm in there because you are not just heating the air but the contents of the shop since all of the metal tools act like ice cubes, then I shut it off. I put on a jacket and combined with moving around the shop I stay warm. Maybe try that next year before insulating and doing anything to the floor.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2714 posts in 1318 days


#15 posted 05-28-2017 08:49 PM

Humidity is the enemy , not cold or heat.

I live in a very humid area of FL I found when I insulated and sealed up my shop it did wonders for all humidity related problems.

That being said, I have an air conditioned work/assembly room I keep my hand tools, work bench, and store the lumber for my current project.

In your situation, if at all possible I would insulate and heat the space.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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