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What are these small "horses" called?

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Forum topic by JasonD posted 11-23-2010 08:48 PM 5001 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JasonD

180 posts in 2328 days


11-23-2010 08:48 PM

On the cover of Christopher Schwarz’s first book on workbenches, he has a pair of small supports under the bench on the front cover picture. In the DVD where he shows how to build the cherry topped Roubo bench, I noticed that he uses on of these small “horses” to support the legs as he cut the tenons while holding them in his vise.

I don’t remember seeing anything in any of his books about them. Is there a particular name for them? I’m looking to build a pair, but they look simple enough that I was going to guess and wing it as far as the dimensions were concerned.


8 replies so far

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JasonD

180 posts in 2328 days


#1 posted 11-23-2010 08:52 PM

Sorry. I meant to attach an image to my first post. Here is a pic of the cover of the book with the supports in question circled in yellow.

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Viking

878 posts in 2662 days


#2 posted 11-23-2010 08:54 PM

Saw ponies? LOL

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

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hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 3594 days


#3 posted 11-23-2010 09:01 PM

Those are Japanese small saw horses.

-- 温故知新

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Jamie Speirs

4167 posts in 2323 days


#4 posted 11-23-2010 09:02 PM

Neigh! Sorry for the pun.

The Bench hurdles. :)

I use them for raising items above the bench for clamping.
Mine are also the same height as my Chop saw bed.
Very handy.
Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3052 days


#5 posted 11-23-2010 09:03 PM

A bed for a very skinny person or reasonably well padded like myself LOL Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2582 days


#6 posted 11-23-2010 09:13 PM

they are Japanese saw horses
go and look at Swartzes blog and in there you will find the answer why he has them :-)

and I know they are great to stack a few boards quickly , ceeping them away from a concrete floor

Dennis

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JasonD

180 posts in 2328 days


#7 posted 11-23-2010 10:03 PM

“saw ponies” lol

Thanks for the replies, everyone. For anyone who wants more info, here’s the link to Chris Schwarz’s blog about them:

http://blog.woodworking-magazine.com/blog/Workbench+From+The+Far+East.aspx

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gko

83 posts in 2711 days


#8 posted 11-25-2010 08:36 AM

Japanese saw horses. Made a pair of them and use them a lot. I glued two 3/4” poplar (to keep weight down) to make 1 1/2” thick slabs and notched the legs and cross piece to lock them together. Hole going through bottom of legs into the cross piece to tighten them up with a dowel. Old Japanese use to take them to sites to work on projects like we would take saw horses. Have used them like traditional saw horses. Used the legs to hold a fence to use as a shooting board. Just laid one of the pieces down to use when chiseling so I wouldn’t hit the floor. Used clamps to hold stuff against them to cut, chisel, etc. Found them handy around the shop.

My Japanese saw horse. I have two that is used together a lot.

Taken apart for transport. I can easily carry the pair. Other saw horse has hole in bottom to lock them tighter.

This is how I use to plane the edge of a board. Plane runs on the added 2×4 and the board is clamped on the saw horse.

Very handy when I’m doing wood working at someone’s house.

-- Wood Menehune, Honolulu

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