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Best way to cut a deep shoulder on one side of a tenon?

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Forum topic by Dagobah posted 05-26-2017 06:55 PM 457 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dagobah

71 posts in 783 days


05-26-2017 06:55 PM

First time using mortise and tenon joinery. (It’s a side table.) Each of the aprons need a 1” shoulder on the bottom of the tenon, and I’m not sure of the best way to make these cuts.

I don’t have a hand saw or a band saw, and I don’t think the table saw would be able to make this precise of a cut.

Should I pickup something like a Japanese Dozuk sawi to make this cleanly, or is there a better way?

I’m making two tables at once, so I’ll be doing this to 6 aprons (cutting 12 tenons).

Here’s a pic:


6 replies so far

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BlasterStumps

863 posts in 560 days


#1 posted 05-26-2017 07:04 PM

Not sure what the concern would be about using a tablesaw for the cuts. I use mine to do things like that. I have an old tenoning jig but before I found it, I used a shop built jig to hold the piece when running it through the saw. Lots of examples and probably plans out there on the WWW. If you still don’t want to use the TS, then yes, a pull saw would or should work. I believe there is a little bit of a learning curve to using that type of saw however.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

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Dagobah

71 posts in 783 days


#2 posted 05-26-2017 07:07 PM

Just to be clear, I’ll be using the table saw to make the tenons, I’m just unsure how to cut the 1” shoulder on the bottom of each tenon.

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jonah

1838 posts in 3419 days


#3 posted 05-26-2017 07:15 PM

Hold the piece on edge and raise the blade the height of the shoulder. Either use a dado stack or just nibble away a blade width at a time. Just the same way you’d make any tenon shoulder on the table saw.

I’m confused about how you’re confused.

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TungOil

1006 posts in 615 days


#4 posted 05-26-2017 07:30 PM

Dagobah

It might help if you explain how you will be making the tenons on your TS. There are two basic methods that folks use to make tenons on a TS.

1) Using a dado stack, cut the tenon with the part flat on the saw and held against a miter gauge or sled fence. this cuts the cheek and shoulder at the same time.

2) using a tenoning jig that holds the part vertical, cut the cheeks using a regular TS blade. Then, cut the shoulders as a second setup/cut using a miter gauge or sled with the part flat on the table.

either of this methods work well. I personally prefer #1 and I nearly always cut the four sides of the tenon at the same time using the same setup since that’s the fastest. to cut the 1” shoulder you show above would just require an additional set up and could be done using either method. Some folks will make the end cuts about 1/32” shy of the shoulders along the long side and come back to clean it up with a chisel by hand, this helps make a nicely fit joint.

There are lots of other ways to cut tenons, but those are probably the two most common that I’m aware of.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Loren

10477 posts in 3768 days


#5 posted 05-26-2017 07:31 PM

I think I understand.

You’ll probably tenon the whole part and then
you have a portion of the tenon you want to
cut off. You can hold it on edge by screwing
a backer board to your miter gauge (if needed)
and cut it off so there’s just a little bit remaining.
Then hand saw or chisel off the waist part of
the tenon and the nub will remain. Carefully
pare it off with a sharp chisel.

It is possible to get the cut very close indeed
on the table saw. You can use the fence as
a stop. In practice though I prefer to pare
off the waste rather than risk some misalignment
on my table saw results in cutting into the shoulder.

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Dagobah

71 posts in 783 days


#6 posted 05-26-2017 11:25 PM



I think I understand.

You ll probably tenon the whole part and then
you have a portion of the tenon you want to
cut off. You can hold it on edge by screwing
a backer board to your miter gauge (if needed)
and cut it off so there s just a little bit remaining.
Then hand saw or chisel off the waist part of
the tenon and the nub will remain. Carefully
pare it off with a sharp chisel.

It is possible to get the cut very close indeed
on the table saw. You can use the fence as
a stop. In practice though I prefer to pare
off the waste rather than risk some misalignment
on my table saw results in cutting into the shoulder.

- Loren

Yup, this is what I was missing. I plan on cutting the tenon using a miter gauge, but couldn’t figure out how to cut that inch off the end. Hadn’t occurred to me to stand up the piece and clamp to a fence on the miter gauge.

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