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trying to add 10 inches to existing cabinet doors

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Forum topic by Pabs posted 11-22-2010 05:29 PM 1754 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Pabs

175 posts in 2200 days


11-22-2010 05:29 PM

Hi all

I`m in the process of designing my new kitchen project..
the house we bought has a solid oak kitchen cabinets.. doors are solid oak with a v-groove every 4 inches or so (on the height).
solid face frames with regular cabinet boxes.. .they are in real good shape so I want to salvage them
we will be painting the cabinets

in order to fit the new design I want to the doors to go all the way to the ceiling..
I can extend the box no problem and add another frame to get to the ceiling..
now the door is where I`m trying to figure out the best course of action

here`s my idea…tell me if I’m nuts…

The doors need to be about 10 inches higher than they are right now
I plan to laminate some oak boards to the width of the doors.
cut a 10 inc section and cut a dado on the lower edge.
cut a matching dado on the door panel (top edge). stick plywood spline (or hardwood if it`s better) in the matching dados. glue and clamp.
once dry, run the new panels in the planner just to remove a shaving to make sure both surface are exactly on the same plane
with my router run the v groove over on the entire panel

sand, paint and voila…new door panel that reaches ceiling…
do this for all 10 doors and I`m done..

now, If I do it this way will that line show up when painted? what steps can I take to ensure the line is not visible at all?
if for some reason there`s a bit of a gap in certain places, what is the best product to fill in that gap to ensure no seam will be visible?

there…. don’t be shy..if you think this won’t work, tell me!

thanks

Pabs
`

-- Pabs


11 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3581 posts in 2707 days


#1 posted 11-22-2010 05:33 PM

You’re gonna have a grain matching problem. Even painting the doors will “telegraph” the grain through the paint. I’d replace the entire door.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View terrilynne's profile

terrilynne

833 posts in 1640 days


#2 posted 11-22-2010 05:40 PM

Why not just build some new 10” doors? Maybe even glass doors so you can display knick knacks or what ever collectables you have. Or just build an open display shelf. Going all the way to the ceiling with shelves they’re going to be hard to reach anyway.

-- Terri, Rocky Mountain High Colorado!

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terrilynne

833 posts in 1640 days


#3 posted 11-22-2010 05:48 PM

Or another thought, build 10” doors on both ends and in the center display shelves. Draw up some ideas and see if this will work for you.

-- Terri, Rocky Mountain High Colorado!

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

175 posts in 2200 days


#4 posted 11-22-2010 05:53 PM

there’s no way to stop this “telegraphing”?

and Terry.. I know they will be hard to reach..we’ll be storing stuff you don’t use everyday there, serving trays, fondue set, etc… stuff you need around just not at eye level all the time :)

-- Pabs

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

6046 posts in 2175 days


#5 posted 11-22-2010 06:24 PM

You can stop the telegraphing and hide the seam with spackle. But, by the time you go through the processes to finally get a 10” taller door, you may as well have just built them to begin with.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View levan's profile

levan

427 posts in 1726 days


#6 posted 11-22-2010 06:26 PM

Adding on to your exizting doors wouldn’t work for me. I agree with terry add some kind of doors at top. Maybe make a soffit with sliding doors.

-- "If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right". Henry Ford

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

175 posts in 2200 days


#7 posted 11-22-2010 07:24 PM

oh I know I could turn around and buy a new set of doors… but I like to salvage whenever possible…even if it means more work…hard work keeps me out of trouble :)
so I don’t mind spending a few nights fiddling with this…as long as I can get good results

-- Pabs

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

1836 posts in 1743 days


#8 posted 11-22-2010 07:36 PM

You mentioned you were painting the doors. I suggest making a NEW door. The doors are what makes the cabinet look good. Doing all the extra work behind and then “PATCHING the front” is not the way to go.
Use the old doors for another project .

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View CampD's profile

CampD

1216 posts in 2233 days


#9 posted 11-22-2010 07:56 PM

Add a new 10” display cabinet to the top, make glass doors to match what you have now. You’ll have to get on a ladder anyway to access the top part, so you might as well make them seperate. I have done this with good results, Clients love them and display little used dishes/knicknacks or what ever. Can even add lights.
I’ll see if I can find one of my projects that I used this idear on.
Whats been said above about painting oak, it’ll never match.

-- Doug...

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

175 posts in 2200 days


#10 posted 11-23-2010 07:11 PM

some good point s floating around… I’m still debating what to do… have a few ideas floating around… this info helps!

I did mention this to a buddy of mine who worked as a cabinet maker for years and said that using bondo (auto body filler) to hide and gaps and wet sanding until my arms fell off… he claims that after that process no line would ever be visible

I wonder about wood movement… even I get the same type of wood… what if it contracts differently from the other…even if slightly, could that make that seam “pop out”?
thanks

-- Pabs

View GaryL's profile

GaryL

1080 posts in 1577 days


#11 posted 11-23-2010 07:28 PM

I’ll go the same route as others and say build new doors. Will probably be less work and no worries of the seam showing or dealing with trying to hide the oak grain. Use some poplar frames and MDF panels, and you’ll have some affordable doors any size you need. Reuse the existing doors on a future project.

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

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