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Lie-Nielsen Cabinet Maker's Rabbeting Scraper Plane - to buy or not?

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Forum topic by Ben posted 05-24-2017 12:39 PM 1669 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ben

356 posts in 2693 days


05-24-2017 12:39 PM

Any of you guys own this plane?
I find very little info about it – only one or two youtube videos.

I am just “getting into” scraping. Seems like a very useful tool.

I purchased the LN #4 bronze smoothing plane because I do a lot of work in curly maple, even got the 50 degree frog. But that tool sits on my bench collecting dust because it still tears out like crazy.

I like the small size of this scraper plane.

Would you consider it a useful adjunct to a card scraper?

Thanks.


14 replies so far

View gargey's profile (online now)

gargey

861 posts in 612 days


#1 posted 05-24-2017 12:52 PM

Are you sure that you have your #4 performing to the maximum of its abilities?

View Ben's profile

Ben

356 posts in 2693 days


#2 posted 05-24-2017 12:54 PM

Probably not, actually. It needs to be sharpened.
But every video I watch of people scraping are doing it on woods like curly maple, tiger oak, etc…
If a smoothing plane would work on all that, why would anyone scrape?

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1175 posts in 1634 days


#3 posted 05-24-2017 01:37 PM

I think your headed in the right direction Ben.I have a Ln bronze smoother and it does a fantastic job most of the time.There are woods that cannot be handplaned so I scrap.
I use a card scraper with a card scraper you’ll have four edges you can flip around and use in a instant.Then if you have two or three ready well you get the point.

-- Aj

View Derek Cohen's profile

Derek Cohen

348 posts in 3804 days


#4 posted 05-24-2017 03:00 PM

Ben, learn to set the chipbreaker close to the edge of the blade to control tearout.

I have a LN#3 and originally used a 55 degree fro. Still got tearout. Now I use a 45 degree from with the chipbreaker set. No tearout. In fact, I have a Veritas #4 Custom with a 42 degree frog. With the chipbreaker set, no tearout.

Here are a couple of articles:

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/WoodworkTechniques/SettingTheChipbreaker.html

http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/readarticle.pl?dir=newarticles&file=articles_935.shtml

Regards from Perth

Derek

-- Buildiing furniture, and reviewing and building tools at http://www.inthewoodshop.com

View Carloz's profile (online now)

Carloz

971 posts in 428 days


#5 posted 05-24-2017 03:09 PM


Probably not, actually. It needs to be sharpened.
- Ben

Are you saying that you use a hand plane without sharpening it and considering buying a new one because the existing does not perform ?
Hint: I sharpen my plane before every project, unless it is a pass or two to make a bevel or remove some small blemish.

View gargey's profile (online now)

gargey

861 posts in 612 days


#6 posted 05-24-2017 03:23 PM

Good to know your situation better. If you want a new tool, no one will stop you, but I highly recommend:
1) Sharpening to super-duper sharp levels (not easy, but important)
2) Taking very very light passes (small depth of cut)
3) Setting the chipbreaker very close to the edge

These 3 things can make a big difference. Yes, there are some woods that are unmanageable, but hand planes that are setup well reduce the number materially.

Also, keep the sole of the plane oiled, that helps too.

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Ben

356 posts in 2693 days


#7 posted 05-24-2017 03:39 PM

Thanks guys. I’ll check out those articles on setting up the chip breaker in my #4. So far I’ve found it pretty fussy to set up, but granted I have very little experience with it.
Back to my original question: is it not worth buying a scraper plane in addition to, or instead of a card scraper?

View Rich's profile

Rich

1978 posts in 425 days


#8 posted 05-24-2017 03:56 PM


Are you saying that you use a hand plane without sharpening it and considering buying a new one because the existing does not perform ?
Hint: I sharpen my plane before every project, unless it is a pass or two to make a bevel or remove some small blemish.

You should take the time to check out Ben’s project page and follow the link to his business web site before you try to educate him. He’s far more skilled than most of us.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1678 posts in 1730 days


#9 posted 05-24-2017 05:37 PM

I sometimes use crazy grain wood. Not long ago I bought a LN 4 1/2 with a 55 degree frog and that solved some of my issues. But there are times when a scraper is the only thing that will work. I love card scrapers but having a lot of mass behind them with a plane is beneficial. Also, this kind of plane works well if you’re doing inlay. I’ve never warmed up to a Stanley 80 and doubt I ever will.

A scraper plane is on my To Buy list. But it wouldn’t be the rabbet, it would be the larger non-rabbet one, which is only $20 more. More mass, I have no use for a rabbeting plane when I scrape. I guess there are times when you would want one, but those times never ever show up for me.

If you’re already using a card scraper a lot now, I would recommend looking into a scraper plane.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4512 posts in 975 days


#10 posted 05-24-2017 05:53 PM

I’m with ColonelTravis in that I would opt for the wider plane without the rabbeting feature. I just don’t see a use for that in my shop. I disagree about the Stanley 80 though ;-0 I like mine.

Personally I just like scrapers, especially for figured woods or really gnarly grain. I wouldn’t be surprised if one of the 112-type scraper planes is in my near future.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1423 posts in 1826 days


#11 posted 05-24-2017 06:42 PM

The Veritas large scraping plane is just the ticket for the gnarly grain other tools cant quite get. Review here. Card scrapers are fine for small areas or tight spots, but too hard on the hands and wrists to use much.

Agree sharpness and chip breaker setting from the cutting edge are major players in smoothing tough grain. I have a 63* Mujingfang woodie that does well too.

View JohnChung's profile

JohnChung

396 posts in 1910 days


#12 posted 05-26-2017 06:26 AM

@Ben. The LN #4 is an exceptional plane. But still one has to use it within the limits. As mentioned by Derek try with the cap iron first. It should solve the problem else another technique needs to be used.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8301 posts in 1322 days


#13 posted 05-26-2017 04:31 PM

Sharp and proper cap iron setup is critical. I’ve planed against the grain just to see how good it worked when setup properly. It worked very well.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View bridgerberdel's profile

bridgerberdel

50 posts in 1078 days


#14 posted 05-27-2017 08:15 PM

A stock bailey pattern plane sharp and fettled can definitely handle figured maple.

-- occasional musings on my blog: www.bridgerberdel.wordpress.com

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