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Rough dimensioning rough cut lumber?

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Forum topic by scribble posted 05-22-2017 03:30 AM 750 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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scribble

146 posts in 2034 days


05-22-2017 03:30 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question bandsaw tablesaw

Is there a best practice for rough dimensioning rough cut lumber? Is it better to use the the band saw to reduce the amount of wood wasted in cutting vs using the table saw for more precision cuts?

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”


18 replies so far

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papadan

3584 posts in 3202 days


#1 posted 05-22-2017 03:36 AM

Sorry Scribble, I’m not following your question. I use nothing but rough lumber but have never “rough dimensioned” any. I just pick out the boards I need for a project and mill them into usable boards.

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scribble

146 posts in 2034 days


#2 posted 05-22-2017 03:49 AM

Say you have a 12” wide board and need boards that are 2.5” wide when all jointing and planing operations are done. Do you start by cutting the 12” board to 2.75 on the band saw or table saw the joint an edge and then final dimension on table saw

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”

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papadan

3584 posts in 3202 days


#3 posted 05-22-2017 03:53 AM

I start by planning the wood to the finished thickness for my project. I joint one edge of the board and then cut to width on the table saw.

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TheFridge

8287 posts in 1319 days


#4 posted 05-22-2017 04:11 AM

Yeah pretty much. I surface all sides. Mainly getting it to final thickness, letting that sit for a week or two. The cut it down from there.

If it’s a smaller project I just thickness it then rip and chop it all at once.

I prefer not to cut it up before jointing unless I’m gonna lose too much thickness on the stock by doing so. That is pretty much the only reason I’d cut it down.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Rich

1972 posts in 423 days


#5 posted 05-22-2017 04:27 AM


Say you have a 12” wide board and need boards that are 2.5” wide when all jointing and planing operations are done. Do you start by cutting the 12” board to 2.75 on the band saw or table saw the joint an edge and then final dimension on table saw

- scribble

I follow what you are saying. I deal with this all the time. The way I work is that the key is to joint one edge, so you have a true straight line to run against a fence. I use the table saw myself, but a well tuned band saw with a fence would work too.

I would then rip the pieces at least 1/8” oversize, in your case 2-7/8”. The reason is that the flat edge you jointed isn’t necessarily square to the face of the board, so when you joint the face flat, and then square the edge to it on the jointer, you need some spare wood. I generally run the board through the planer at this point to get it flat, then rip the opposite edge square to the true final dimension. Whether you rip first, then plane shouldn’t be significant, but the idea is to get one smooth face, and one edge square to it before you continue.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Loren

9604 posts in 3481 days


#6 posted 05-22-2017 04:34 AM

It depends on the grain direction. Generally
to correct for wiley grain that runs off the
board a good practice is to divide up a
large board with a lumber crayon, crosscut,
then band saw parallel to the grain on each
piece if needed. Then the edge is straightened
on the jointer and ripped so the other edge
is parallel on the table saw.

This sort of approach is sometimes eliminated
in less careful cabinet work, but it can work
wonders for the appearance of door and
face frames, table skirts and so forth.

When making larger panels however often
it doesn’t make economic sense to be
so selective and in any case, contrasting
grain patterns aren’t that distracting when
glued up if some care is taken in laying
the parts out next to each other to see
how the grain and color of the parts
go together.

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rwe2156

2710 posts in 1314 days


#7 posted 05-22-2017 01:42 PM

Some ww’ers rough cut their lumber to width before surfacing. In this case, a bandsaw is the safest machine to use. BS is not primarily used to save lumber.

First principle is “Never, ever cut rough lumber to final dims”. Basically you are gradually milling stock down correcting for any cups/bows etc that continue during acclimation.

There are numerous resources on YouTube and Fine WoodWorking magazine.

Basically, here is the procedure I use:

1. Cut to rough lengths. I use a circular saw or jigsaw. I keep mulitiple short pieces in one board for surfacing the cut to length later.

2. Face joint one side. Concave sides down.
3. Edge joint one side.
4. Surface other side.
5. Rip to rough width on TS
6. Sticker and let acclimate for 2-3 days.

Shoot for at least 2 thickness millings. This allows for acclimation and rejointing face/edges.

Keep widths big to allow for correcting a bow (wide the board, more the allowance). Narrow boards 1/4”, wide boards maybe up to 1”.

When I’m ready to start assembling project, I will re-joint lightly one more time, then re-rip to exact dims, leaving a bit of room (1/32) for hand planing because in furniture projects I like the look.

One very crucial thing is make sure all matching parts go through the planer at once along with a couple pieces of scrap if needed for set up purposes.

Hope this helps.

I keep table top thicknesses heavy until right before use.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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CharlesA

3289 posts in 1631 days


#8 posted 05-22-2017 01:51 PM

Rough lumber on the Table Saw? Isn’t that just asking for a kick back?

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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jonah

1443 posts in 3132 days


#9 posted 05-22-2017 01:53 PM

When rough cutting lumber, use whatever tool is best for the size and thickness of lumber being cut. For a very long, wide, heavy piece, I’d rough cut to length with a jig saw or circular saw. Then, if I’m using most of the board’s width and it fits on my jointer, I’d flatten and mill it as described above. If it won’t fit on my jointer, I’ll rough cut to width using a track saw or band saw, then mill it.

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Rich

1972 posts in 423 days


#10 posted 05-22-2017 02:07 PM


2. Face joint one side.

Scribble specifically asked about starting with a 12” wide board. Short of him having a 12” jointer, he needed another approach, and ripping pieces slightly oversize is one of them.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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DrDirt

4407 posts in 3575 days


#11 posted 05-22-2017 02:25 PM

Bandsaw for ripping will chew up less wood and less chance of kickback.

But if I were ripping the 12 inch wide board (which will likely have some cupping to it) yes I would rip it oversize (width) rather than try to joint 12 inches flat… just to make 2.5 inch wide boards out of it.

I would adjust just how “oversize” base on how many boards I need to get.

in your 12 inch wide for 2.5 inch boards example…. you will only get 4 boards. certainly at least 1/8 in width extra needed, so you can joint one edge and rip to final with.

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

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Sylvain

680 posts in 2333 days


#12 posted 05-22-2017 03:28 PM

What Loren explained is illustrated here

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

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scribble

146 posts in 2034 days


#13 posted 05-22-2017 04:18 PM

So here is what my thought is and correct me if you think I should do this a differnt way. I need boards 2 7/16” wide by 3/4” thick by 28 1/4” long. I am planning on cutting up my 12” wide X 8’ long board into 30” long sections to make it more manageable. I then set up the band saw to cut 2 3/4” wide. i will then joint a face and edge and then plane to final thickness and final width on table saw.

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”

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CharlesA

3289 posts in 1631 days


#14 posted 05-22-2017 04:21 PM

If it were me, I’d do what you suggest, but joint 6” wide boards. After planing, I’d rip the boards to final length. It’s just easier and more efficient to joint half as many boards and limit the number of band saw rips for more accurate table saw rips.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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jonah

1443 posts in 3132 days


#15 posted 05-22-2017 04:30 PM

I’d do what Charles suggested. Only break the pieces down as far as you need to in order to fit them on your jointer. Rip to final size as the last step in milling them.

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