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Delta/Craftsman 4" Jointer

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Forum topic by r33tc0w posted 05-20-2017 04:04 AM 258 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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r33tc0w

95 posts in 120 days


05-20-2017 04:04 AM

picked this little guy up today. Any one have a date range? By the looks of the art on the decal on the front my guess is the 30s?

Also looking for some tips since this will be my first power tool restore. Replace wires, belt – another guy at the estate sale said I should ground it, how do I go about that? Is there a checklist to run through to ensure all is in working order?

-- Matthew 13:53-58


6 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5212 posts in 1835 days


#1 posted 05-20-2017 04:32 AM

Got a serial number?

You might want to browse the photos and documentation over at the VM site… looks like a #300 or #301, which were made in the late 20’s to sometime in the 30’s. If so, then it won’t have a serial number and you can just get a date range unfortunately.

Oh… forgot about the grounding. The guy at the sale was correct… most of those were wired for ungrounded service. When you replace the cord, just take the ground (green) wire and attach it to the motor frame or wiring box… any place where it gets good metal-to-metal contact.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View RichTaylor's profile

RichTaylor

793 posts in 225 days


#2 posted 05-20-2017 05:12 AM


Replace wires, belt – another guy at the estate sale said I should ground it, how do I go about that?

Grounding is just rewiring it with a 3-wire setup. The ground wire can be attached to any metal part on the tool. You can get a cord at any hardware store. There should be a black wire, white wire and green wire. Green is ground.

That’s a really cool tool, BTW.

Edit: Looking at the photo again, I wouldn’t get too worried about grounding. The motor looks like it has a 3-wire cord coming in, and besides, it’s isolated from the jointer with that belt.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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r33tc0w

95 posts in 120 days


#3 posted 05-20-2017 03:47 PM

Here are some more photos. I fired it up, everything turned, even took some wood off. This is my first jointer and quite honestly the cutter head scares the crap out of me… Gonna need some push sticks. The spring has good tension. The infeed and outfeed tables are going to take some work to release and the cart it’s sitting on will need a face lift.

if I need to replace the belt:

The on and off switch is a little peculiar:

-- Matthew 13:53-58

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RichTaylor

793 posts in 225 days


#4 posted 05-20-2017 04:02 PM


Gonna need some push sticks.

Actually, you want to get push blocks. A two of these will help keep your hands safe.

https://www.amazon.com/Bench-Dog-Tools-10-033-Push-Bloc/dp/B005HH1B9K/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1495295899&sr=8-1&keywords=push+block

The MicroJig brand has drop-down hooks that help push the board. Depending on what you want to spend, one Bench Dog and one MicroJig would be optimal. You can make your own too, if you prefer.

https://www.amazon.com/GRR-RIP-BLOCK-Pushblock-Router-Jointer/dp/B00DNX3N7S/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1495295899&sr=8-6&keywords=push+block

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View Guswah's profile

Guswah

6 posts in 103 days


#5 posted 05-20-2017 08:41 PM

That is an absolutely BEAUTIFUL machine. Do you think you’ll wear it out in your lifetime? :)

I highly doubt that Delta put Craftsman motors on this machine at the outset, so if you’re a purist wanting to restore it to its out-of-the-box state, then you’ll need to find its stock motor. I doubt that is what you’re after. My suggestion is to simply replace the Craftsman with a more modern one that will already come grounded. It would probably have double or triple the power, and it would start/stop much more smoothly. I had a similar jointer, albeit 40 years newer, and already the body had begun cheapening down a fair bit.

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EricTwice

162 posts in 169 days


#6 posted 05-20-2017 09:49 PM

I’ve owned a couple of pieces from the 1920’s and guards were just coming into fashion at that decade. It has a nice guard so I would guess 1930’s. I’d recommend changing out the spring on the guard before you use it. (just a safety thing, like grounding it.)

That’s a wonderful piece. once it’s; cleaned up, tuned up and waxed down, She will be good to go for another 50-60 years or so.

-- nice recovery, They should pay extra for that mistake, Eric E.

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