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Plantation Shutters - UV protection?

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Forum topic by Holbs posted 05-19-2017 11:01 PM 431 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Holbs

1703 posts in 1845 days


05-19-2017 11:01 PM

Topic tags/keywords: plantation shutters uv protection

My current first experimental plantation shutter project is in a 5’x5’ window with a porch overhang so not too concerned about direct sunlight and UV rays. However, my rear patio sliding glass door “future” plantation shutter project will see the sun from noon til sunset, and I’m 5,000 feet in the air. I am concerned about direct sunlight and UV protection upon my possible dye stained and poly utherane basswood / knotty alder frame & shutters. I am new in the realm of finishing so not sure what to ask or how to find solutions. An alternative is to install sun blocker screens on the patio screen door and the fixed glass door as I have those sun blocker screens on kitchen and bedroom windows (which work wonderfully btw).
Yet, every discussion & video about constructing plantation shutters do not bring up UV protection upon wood shutters. Am I making too much of a big deal out of it?

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter


4 replies so far

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Rich

1886 posts in 406 days


#1 posted 05-20-2017 02:00 AM

Generally, when you are talking UV protection in a finish, it comes down to spar varnish.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4718 posts in 2309 days


#2 posted 05-20-2017 11:44 AM

A couple of points, dyes are not as light fast as other color agents, and you might be real unhappy with anything you try to use to protect them. Also, urethanes are the bane of outdoor finishing… they do poorly in high UV environments and at 5000’ (as you know) it will be worse. Spar varnish might be a good choice, if it’s not a box store spar. They generally all have urethane resins and at Flexner tested them for UV protection and concluded that at least one (Helmsman) did so poorly it didn’t seem to have any UV inhibitors. That leaves the true marine grade spar varnishes. They are great, but they are very expensive and need several coats for best protection. I have another suggestion: untinted oil based exterior paint. The base paint used for the deep colors (#4 in most brands) will look very much like varnish once applied and last a good long while providing UV protection at the same time. The problem with this is that oil based paints are getting really hard to find. I have used the Olympic brand and found to last a really long time (at 1000’ feet) but I can’t find it anymore…my next gallon will come from SW. Anyway, if this interests you, here's more info. Bear in mind the article is a little dated with the brand reco’s, but the basic info is very good. One last thing, no matter what you use it will need maintenance over time…and no, you are not making too big a deal out of it. I made window sills out of white oak, and used the untinted paint, it lasted for 6 years and still looked like new when we sold the house…these had a southern exposure and received 7-8 hours of sunlight a day, at least for 8 months a year. In these conditions the untinted paint really lasts a long time.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Holbs

1703 posts in 1845 days


#3 posted 05-20-2017 01:21 PM

Fred..thanks for that info. I think my pathway for future direct sunlight windows will be painted white with whatever UV protection I can find (thankfully, patio door / kitchen area so should be color coded with rest of kitchen). I even read that particle stains are better UV protection for shutters instead of dye stains.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

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Fred Hargis

4718 posts in 2309 days


#4 posted 05-20-2017 01:28 PM

If you use an exterior grade white (or any color) paint, it will have all the UV protection you need….tinted paint is by far the best protection from UV damage. Forgot to mention, if you ask for the #4 base without tint, you will (probably) get some strange looks. When I bought my first gallon (Olympic, at Lowes) the young lady at the mix counter told me she couldn’t sell it that way. This was back in the days when the mix counter and paints were behind a chain link cage of sorts, the counter person had to get it for you. I snuck in after she walked away, grabbed a gallon and ran to the checkout.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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