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Forum topic by Debora Cadene posted 05-19-2017 09:09 PM 1004 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Debora Cadene

60 posts in 1552 days


05-19-2017 09:09 PM

Hey all…I am in the midst of building a dog house for my three critters. My floor is 48” deep and 72” wide. I’d like to make the front 40” and have the back slope around 35 or 36”. I would like to confirm what my angle is going to be, AND make sure I am measuring the back studs correctly. Am I measuring to the short side of the angle, or the tall side of the angle to get a total of 35” or 36” (which ever will give me the easiest angle on my chop saw. For the front, I know I measure to the hi side of my angle, and the actual board will be cut at 46.5” (+ 1.5 = 48), but not sure on them back ones.
Please help, and thanks bunches!!
Debbie.


11 replies so far

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2779 posts in 1948 days


#1 posted 05-19-2017 09:18 PM

Debbie, you could just lay out the pieces on their sides on the floor, put them the way you want them, mark them, then cut them by aligning the blade with the lines. However, if you want to know what the exact angle is ahead of time, then you can use this handy calculator. HTH

-- Art

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Debora Cadene

60 posts in 1552 days


#2 posted 05-19-2017 09:34 PM

Thanks for the link Art. What about the back wall though…Am I measuring 35” or 36” to the short side of the angle, or the hi side?

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JBrow

1183 posts in 611 days


#3 posted 05-20-2017 02:22 AM

Debora Cadene,

From what I gather, the question relates to the side wall stud heights and the angle where the roof framing meets the side wall studs.

I think AandCstyle’s suggestion of laying out the framing on the floor, marking the studs, and making the cuts is the way to go. The sketch (looking down on the side-wall framing laid out on the floor) shows the measurements and the angle you would probably obtain (if the back wall is 35” high) when using AandCstyle’s lay out and marking method. The studs in this view are drawn on-edge at 1-1/2”.

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Debora Cadene

60 posts in 1552 days


#4 posted 05-20-2017 11:33 AM

Wow!! Not sure how you did that diagram, but thanks so much. My biggest question I think though…is for that back stud. Am I measuring the 35” to the hi side, or inside of that board, or the low side (outside )? Also, since my walls are only 72”, will it make much difference if I place a stud at each end, one in the middle, and then center one on each side of the middle (5) for the back wall? I will have to lay it out differently for the front wall, because of my door, which i’d like to be 14”, but still figuring out the placement of the boards for that yet.

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JBrow

1183 posts in 611 days


#5 posted 05-20-2017 02:44 PM

Debora Cadene

If I understand your first question, the back wall stud is, if posted sketch is drawn accurately, 35-1/8” on the side of the back stud that faces the front of the house (long-side of angle) and is 35” at the back wall (low side of the angle).

The side wall studs would be beveled at the top at 5.9 degrees while the front and back wall studs would be mitred cut to the 5.9 degree angle. The top plates that support the roof rafters could then be attached to the wall studs. The rafters would then all be in the same angled plane.

Spacing all the wall studs at the standard 16” measured from the centers of the studs would be standard wall framing and helps when using other building products. The alternative would be spacing the wall studs at 24” measured from the centers to the centers of the studs. But the sketch is drawn with 16” on center (OC) stud placement. A spacing that differs from 16” OC would still require the top beveled and mitred angles cut at 5.9 degrees, but the lengths of the studs would differ from shown in the sketch.

When framing the doggie door, a pair of studs that run from the sole plate at the bottom to the cap plate at the top (king studs) would be placed 17” apart where the 17” space would be where the door is located. Then a pair of short of studs (jack studs – the length equal to the height of the door opening minus 1-1/2” since the jack studs set on the sole plate) would be attached to the inside (door side) of the king studs, resulting in a distance of 14” between the jack studs. Then a header would set atop the jack studs. The header could be one or, better yet, two 2×4s. Lastly a stud would run from the header to the cap plate (cripple stud), where this cripple stud would be positioned 16” or maybe 32” from a wall stud (not a king stud).

Since this door framing description may be confusing, a diagram of a the rough framing for a door is shown in the link…

http://thequickdoorhanger.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/DOOR-TERMS.jpg

Racking in the framing may be a concern since there is little structure in the studded wall to resist racking. Applying a sheet good like OSB or plywood would greatly strengthen the walls. However, if tongue and groove or ship lap siding is used to dress up the exterior of the dog house without application of a sheet good wall underlayment, diagonal bracing at each corner of each wall would be a way to resist racking. Plank siding alone may not be enough to resist racking.

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Debora Cadene

60 posts in 1552 days


#6 posted 05-21-2017 12:00 AM

THAT was another wicked reply!! Thank you so much. I have a dewalt 12” compound/mitre chop saw. Finding 5.9 might not be perfect. What if I was to try 6 degree instead. Would that be ok, or would things turn for a crap pretty quick?
I will be siding my dog house with 1/2” plywood on the outside, then insulation, with 3/8” plywood for the inside.
And thank you all for the diagrams and links. Any and all tidbits, and helpful hints on anything I am doing is always greatly appreciated. The diagrams made what you said, extremely understandable.

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JBrow

1183 posts in 611 days


#7 posted 05-21-2017 01:28 AM

Debora Cadene,

While 6 degrees rather than 5.94 degrees may not work well for fine furniture, for rough framing 6 degrees should be close enough. Since sheet goods are used as sheathing, no diagonal bracing is needed.

View Guswah's profile

Guswah

6 posts in 158 days


#8 posted 05-21-2017 04:02 AM

How to perfect a 4×6-foot, insulated doghouse might be a first-world problem to others on this planet, but I must say I admire someone who cares that much for her best friends. I know I do with mine.

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Debora Cadene

60 posts in 1552 days


#9 posted 05-21-2017 11:51 AM

Thanks Gusway…I know some would say, “its just a dog house” and “don’t over think this”, but as much as I’d like to be a little more relaxed about a one or two degree difference, I Just Can’t. I don’t want to just follow along, I’d like to know why or how I’m doing what I’m doing. and I have yet to get something completely square, and it sort of drives me batty. I don’t plan on having my dogs stay in the kennel area for any length of time, but I do want them to have someplace secure to hang out in, if I have stuff to do. Building something that looks somewhat respectable, with out “hiding” all my boo-boo’s behind a sheet of plywood, will in deed give me the warm and fuzzies at night, and put a grin on my face at the same time. I do love my dawgz!! And I really hate adding so much wood to my sacrificial pile, because I’ve made the wrong cuts…...again. I built a set of saw horses the other day, and made all my cuts, but didn’t bother to notice I mitred instead of beveled. Such a ding-bat!!

JBrow…i’m not exactly sure I am understanding what the sheathing or diagonal bracing means?

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JBrow

1183 posts in 611 days


#10 posted 05-21-2017 02:31 PM

Debora Cadene,

I am not sure what you do not understand so in answering, I just overlook that which you already know. But since you are using plywood to cover the exterior of the dog house, you are covered.

Sheathing is the material applied to a building’s exterior structure (wall studs and roof rafters). It can be boards or sheet goods like plywood.

Racking would occur in a wall if, after the framing is built plumb and square, a force is applied on one corner so as to move the stud framing out of plumb and square.

Two ways I know of to resist racking in a studded wall are to add sheet good (plywood or OSB for example) sheathing. The plywood you are using is this sheathing. Once the plywood is attached to the studs, nailed to each stud and the top and bottom plates, the stud wall will resist racking forces and thereby keep the wall studs plumb and square.

If boards are used for sheathing, racking can still occur. Therefore diagonal bracing is needed for this type of sheathing to resist racking. A diagonal brace would run from a bottom corner to the top plate at an angle. The diagonal brace would be attached to each stud the bracing encounters along its length. One diagonal brace on each wall is probably enough, although one diagonal brace at each end of the studded wall would be better. A diagonal brace could be a piece of metal designed to act as a diagonal wall brace or a 2×4 let into notches cut into the 2×4 studs along the length of the of the brace.

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Debora Cadene

60 posts in 1552 days


#11 posted 05-21-2017 03:27 PM

Thank you for that JBrow, :)

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