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can anyone tell me what this would be called?

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Forum topic by pvwoodcrafts posted 11-18-2010 03:51 AM 1307 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pvwoodcrafts

234 posts in 3381 days


11-18-2010 03:51 AM

Its red oak but very different. It basically has no grain pattern and is very heavy. I dried it with some curly red oak and it is noticebly heavier than the curly stock. here is a photo of a 8 1/2 in. dry board

Same board with mineral spirits

and endgrain

is there a name for this?

-- mike & judy western md. www. pvwoodcrafts.com pvwccf1@verizon.net


9 replies so far

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DrewM

176 posts in 2459 days


#1 posted 11-18-2010 04:00 AM

To me it almost looks like a piece of quatersawn red oak but I’m by far an expert.

-- Drew, Delaware

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pvwoodcrafts

234 posts in 3381 days


#2 posted 11-18-2010 04:10 AM

no its flatsawn. wasn’t a real big tree though as you can see by the end grain

-- mike & judy western md. www. pvwoodcrafts.com pvwccf1@verizon.net

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DrewM

176 posts in 2459 days


#3 posted 11-18-2010 04:17 AM

Oh ok to me the end grain picture made it look like the grain of quatersawn board. Hopefully someone can chime in on this.

-- Drew, Delaware

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Gregn

1642 posts in 2443 days


#4 posted 11-18-2010 06:48 AM

See if this helps.
Plainsawn and Quartersawn
Lumber can be cut from a log in two distinct ways: (a) tangential
to the annual rings, producing flatsawn or plainsawn
lumber in hardwoods and flatsawn or slash-grained lumber in
softwoods, and (b) radially from the pith or parallel to the
rays, producing quartersawn lumber in hardwoods and edgegrained
or vertical-grained lumber in softwoods (Fig. 3–1).
Quartersawn lumber is not usually cut strictly parallel with
the rays. In plainsawn boards, the surfaces next to the edges
are often far from tangential to the rings. In commercial
practice, lumber with rings at angles of 45° to 90° to the
wide surface is called quartersawn, and lumber with rings at
angles of 0° to 45° to the wide surface is called plainsawn.
Hardwood lumber in which annual rings form angles of 30°
to 60° to the wide faces is sometimes called bastard sawn.
For many purposes, either plainsawn or quartersawn lumber
is satisfactory. Each type has certain advantages that can be
important for a particular use. Some advantages of plainsawn
and quartersawn lumber are given in Table 3–1.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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pvwoodcrafts

234 posts in 3381 days


#5 posted 11-19-2010 03:03 PM

Well I found out what this would be called. Its called Bearclaw figure. thanks all

-- mike & judy western md. www. pvwoodcrafts.com pvwccf1@verizon.net

#6 posted 11-19-2010 05:23 PM

I’ve seen this once in a cabinet door veneer. It looks fibrous like it may have been near the roots of the tree, but if it’s throughout a long board, then it’s just its own unique stuff. Looks good. BTW, got your shipment yet Mike?

-- Lane Custom Guitars and Basses

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pvwoodcrafts

234 posts in 3381 days


#7 posted 11-19-2010 07:22 PM

Yeah the figure runs the entire 8 and 10 ft lengths of these boards, and no it hasn’t shown up yet.

-- mike & judy western md. www. pvwoodcrafts.com pvwccf1@verizon.net

View Pete Mohr's profile

Pete Mohr

75 posts in 2548 days


#8 posted 11-20-2010 03:18 PM

Lacy She Oak?

http://www.043turning.com.au/index.php?_a=viewProd&productId=46

-- "Man is so made that he can only find relaxation from one kind of labor by taking up another." -Anatole France

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1283 posts in 3197 days


#9 posted 11-20-2010 05:27 PM

LJs Rustfever ( Ira ) sent a sample of an oak he called cork oak to the hobbithouse wood collector.

Here is the link: http://hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/oak,%20misc.htm

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

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