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sealing log ends with glue

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Forum topic by Karda posted 05-17-2017 07:16 PM 940 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

779 posts in 367 days


05-17-2017 07:16 PM

got a question about Elmers school glue. I want to coat my log ends with wood glue to seal them and school glue is cheap, will that work as well as tite bond or other carpenters glue, thanks Mike


26 replies so far

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

709 posts in 308 days


#1 posted 05-17-2017 07:23 PM

are you sealing green logs to control splitting?

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Wildwood

2177 posts in 1948 days


#2 posted 05-17-2017 08:04 PM

I use Gulf Wax to end seal. Melt the wax in a pot and dip the ends spindle blanks and use a frying pan for bowl blanks. I leave both spindle & bowl blanks bigger than I need. Most grocery store carry the stuff!

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Gulf-Wax-Household-Paraffin-Wax-16-oz/10420578

Some people claim carpenters glue works for end sealing but never tried it! Would rather use old paint or clear wood finish as an end sealer if don’t want to fools with hot plate and pots & pans.

-- Bill

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TheDane

5312 posts in 3476 days


#3 posted 05-17-2017 09:38 PM

I went to a thrift store (e.g. Goodwill, St Vincent DePaul, etc.) and bought an old electric frying pan and a bag of candles … total investment was about $6. Melt the candles in the frying pan, dip the end of the log into the molten wax, and presto.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Karda

779 posts in 367 days


#4 posted 05-17-2017 10:29 PM

ok thanks

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Karda

779 posts in 367 days


#5 posted 05-18-2017 06:55 AM

do you mix anything with the paraffin such as mineral oil

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papadan

3584 posts in 3182 days


#6 posted 05-18-2017 07:00 AM

No, don’t mix anything in the wax. Another thing that works is paint, plain old latex house paint will coat the ends and control drying. Elmers school glue dissolves when wet.

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Karda

779 posts in 367 days


#7 posted 05-18-2017 07:02 AM

what I was thinking was using it to seal my finished project as well

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Wildwood

2177 posts in 1948 days


#8 posted 05-18-2017 04:33 PM

You can certainly finish your project with glue, have no idea if will provide any protection. Doubt that it will seal the wood at all.

All wood finishes will fail over time some sooner than later. Film forming wood finishes only slow down water vapor transfer (wood gaining or losing moisture) but not stop it. Next come your wiping varnishes. Your oil varnish blends offer no sealing protection whats so ever. Only penetrating oil finish that provides some protection if apply enough coats is pure Tung oil.

There is a time & place for using any of the wood finishes mentioned and has nothing to do with cost of the product your looking at what protection you need for the project!

-- Bill

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Karda

779 posts in 367 days


#9 posted 05-18-2017 05:52 PM

ok thanks

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bigJohninvegas

378 posts in 1275 days


#10 posted 05-19-2017 02:46 PM

I got several bottles of elmers glue for free once and used it to seal up some wood. Worked ok. More recently I have just used the titebond two glue that I have on hand. I thin it a little with water and paint it on. Works well and is cheaper than anchor seal.


I went to a thrift store (e.g. Goodwill, St Vincent DePaul, etc.) and bought an old electric frying pan and a bag of candles … total investment was about $6. Melt the candles in the frying pan, dip the end of the log into the molten wax, and presto.

- TheDane

I have seen where wax has been used, and most of the store bought blanks have a wax film on it. I like the second hand skillet and candle idea. Going to give it a try.

-- John

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Karda

779 posts in 367 days


#11 posted 05-19-2017 06:22 PM

i think I will go with wax, I have a small propane grill so heating won’t be a problem. thanks for the suggestion

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Wildwood

2177 posts in 1948 days


#12 posted 05-19-2017 07:06 PM

If you buy turning blanks from a commercial vendor 99% of the time they will come completely sealed wax. Wood dipped into hot paraffin wax has highest moisture exclusion effectiveness of any sealer. Wax does not allow wood to lose or gain moisture. Unless the wax seal is compromised that wood will have the same moisture content as when sealed.

When we end seal all we are trying to do is slow down the drying process not stop it!. Turning blanks loses MC twelve time fast from end than sides. Blanks dry from the out side in, if not controlled wood checks and or splits. So need to end seal ASAP.

Can use lot of different products to end seal but end sealing is not a set it and forget it procedure. Have to monitor or will end up losing wood to turn.

-- Bill

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Karda

779 posts in 367 days


#13 posted 05-19-2017 10:45 PM

if commercial blanks are totally coated should the wax on the sides be removed for better drying. From what I have read that would keep the piece from drying and could promote bacteria etc.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5312 posts in 3476 days


#14 posted 05-20-2017 12:22 AM

if commercial blanks are totally coated should the wax on the sides be removed for better drying. From what I have read that would keep the piece from drying and could promote bacteria etc.

- Karda

According to Cook Woods ( http://www.cookwoods.com/wood-faqs/#answer2 ) ...
How do I remove/work with the wax?
The wood will dry slowly through the wax so it is not necessary to remove it if you are storing it for later or allowing it to dry. Removing the wax will increase the chances of checking and/or warping. If you are going to use the wood immediately, removal of the wax is not necessary as it will easily cut away when you start turning the blank. If the blank is wet (freshly cut), use the twice turning method and a paper bag to dry the blank slowly without degrade. The wax is much softer than the wood and will turn away without you even noticing that it is there. If you are planning on cutting a bowl blank into small boards on a band saw, just make the first cut for removal of the wax (usually a 1/16” sacrificial piece). After this is removed, set your fence to the desired thickness of your boards and start re-sawing. Remember to cut the boards thicker than your final thickness dimensions so you can sand or surface the faces clean at a later time. Allow for more thickness if the blank is wet as the wood will shrink as it dries. You can number the boards sequentially as you cut them off so that you can keep track of the book matched / sequential boards. Very careful use of a razor blade can also be effective, but the best removal method is to cut the portion of wax off with a saw.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Karda

779 posts in 367 days


#15 posted 05-20-2017 12:48 AM

thanks for the information that is good to know, I saved the link it is quite helpful thanks Mike

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