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Power Cord for a Delta Dust Collector

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Forum topic by Duffman posted 05-17-2017 01:48 PM 1463 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Duffman

66 posts in 1137 days


05-17-2017 01:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip trick dust collector electrical

Hey guys,
I purchased a used Delta Dust Collector at an auction and it doesn’t have a power cord. I was able to test it to make sure it does work, but don’t have a cord run to it. I went to get one yesterday, but then I couldn’t figure out which one I needed. I am hoping someone here might know. I have attached a couple of pics below to aid in the process. Thanks for the help.

-- I'm not addicted to buying tools or wood... I can stop any time I want!


22 replies so far

View eflanders's profile

eflanders

215 posts in 1659 days


#1 posted 05-17-2017 02:24 PM

The unit is wired for 230 volt. Depending on the length of the cord needed, use some 3 or 4 wire, 12 gauge or heavier gauge cord. Get a plug, (3 or 4) prong to match your power receptacle. The plug and receptacle must be rated to handle both the voltage and amperage as listed on the motor (not the starter/switch) if still in doubt, consult a local electrician.

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

185 posts in 429 days


#2 posted 05-17-2017 02:24 PM

May be determined by the terminal connections inside the box. I’d consider a dryer cord as a starting point.

-- Sawdust Maker

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

891 posts in 1370 days


#3 posted 05-18-2017 01:41 AM

No way does it need a 30A dryer cord. Look at the motor amps/HP to size the cord. My guess is no more than a 20A cord is needed.

View jonah's profile

jonah

1373 posts in 3108 days


#4 posted 05-18-2017 02:28 AM

The motor plate will tell you how many amps it draws, but you lose nothing by oversizing the cord. If it’s a 3HP motor, I’d use a 30A rated cable.

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MrUnix

5894 posts in 2008 days


#5 posted 05-18-2017 02:46 AM

That’s a 3hp motor, so it shouldn’t draw anything more than about 15 amps. A dryer cord would be fine if you are actually plugging into a dryer outlet (and it’s within 6 feet of the DC). But the best way has already mentioned… get some 12 gauge SOOW cable and an appropriate plug from the BORG and wire it up.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Dave's profile

Dave

154 posts in 3006 days


#6 posted 05-18-2017 03:32 AM

I would ask an electrician for some advice. I’m an engineer and I’m reasonably comfortable doing stuff like this but I still do that to he sure.

You have to consider two things: how much current the motor can draw and how much current the circuit can supply before tripping the breaker. Ideally they match. Remember, the breaker just protects the wire in the walls from getting too hot. That’s its only job. A 30-amp circuit will happily allow a 20-amp motor to pull too much current all day long and set itself on fire if it doesnt have its own breaker or fuse.

My electrician recommended putting each 220v machine on its own circuit with a dedicated breaker matched to its peak current. He made that recommendation after seeing the adapter I’d made to plug my 20 amp tools into a 30 amp outlet so I’m passing along what he told me.

With all that out of the way, 20 amp 220v tools often use NEMA 5-20P plugs. Using 10 or 12 gauge wire (smaller numbers handle more current) should comfortably handle 15+ amps at 220v depending on the length of the run. The internet has many charts showing wire gauge vs. current and distance. Again, if in doubt, ask an expert. This stuff can kill you, burn your house down, or at least fry your new dust collector.

Hope that helps! Good luck!

-- "I'm not afraid of heights. I'm afraid of widths." - Steven Wright

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runswithscissors

2539 posts in 1834 days


#7 posted 05-18-2017 04:27 AM

Why would you need more than 2 (hot) wires plus a ground? There will be no neutral wire in that setup.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3523 posts in 2118 days


#8 posted 05-18-2017 05:19 AM



Why would you need more than 2 (hot) wires plus a ground? There will be no neutral wire in that setup.

- runswithscissors

I ran a 3hp uni saw for years on 2 hots and a ground on a 20 AMP circuit. 20 AMP breaker in the panel and 12 wire in the wall with outlets and cord caps rated for 20 amps.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View jonah's profile

jonah

1373 posts in 3108 days


#9 posted 05-18-2017 07:11 AM

Again, you lose nothing (aside from a very few dollars) from oversizing the cord. 10 or 12 gauge wire and whatever plug fits the motor current draw will do. You then match the receptacle to the plug and then the breaker size to the receptacle.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

4378 posts in 2013 days


#10 posted 05-18-2017 07:46 AM

I think you should contact Delta and ask them, The DOL Starter is rated to 5.5kW but I am not sure how MrUnix can read the tally plate but thats some vision I tell you!

-- Regards Robert

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robscastle

4378 posts in 2013 days


#11 posted 05-18-2017 08:12 AM

I think you should contact Delta and ask them, The DOL Starter is rated to 5.5kW but I am not sure how MrUnix can read the tally plate but thats some vision I tell you!

-- Regards Robert

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5894 posts in 2008 days


#12 posted 05-18-2017 09:02 AM

The DOL Starter is rated to 5.5kW but I am not sure how MrUnix can read the tally plate but thats some vision I tell you!
- robscastle

What the starter is rated at is irrelevant, and it should have an internal switch to set OL current based on motor used… that DC is either a Delta #50-852 (3hp three phase) or #50-853 (3hp single phase). I dug around a bit and found the data plate for the motor:

I guestimated the 15A… data plate shows a FLA of 18A@230VAC, or a little less @240V. 12 gauge SOOW would handle it, and 10 gauge would be way more than enough. If it is three phase, then it would be rated at even less.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

4378 posts in 2013 days


#13 posted 05-18-2017 09:14 AM

All is revealed!!

-- Regards Robert

View jonah's profile

jonah

1373 posts in 3108 days


#14 posted 05-18-2017 12:33 PM

You’ll also need at the very least a wiring diagram for the thing, since it currently has no cord. That should be in the manual, which you should be able to find online.

As an aside: how were you able to test it to see if it works if it doesn’t have a power cord?

View eflanders's profile

eflanders

215 posts in 1659 days


#15 posted 05-18-2017 01:02 PM

My comment on 3 or 4 wire was based on the unknown receptacle the OP is using. While a neutral is necessary, it is possible the OP is connecting his unit to a circuit wired accordingly. The wiring connections for the motor MAY be printed under the motor connection cover. But getting a manual for your unit is always a good idea.

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