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Forum topic by AstroEd posted 05-17-2017 12:50 PM 2964 views 1 time favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AstroEd

24 posts in 212 days


05-17-2017 12:50 PM

I picked up a Ryobi 16” Scroll Saw (Still in box office until I get a table) to learn on at Home Depot (Dreaming of a Seyco ST-21) I was wondering what else I need to get to effectively make projects? How do you sand inside the cuts, what sealants, stains, prep materials, etc do I need? The Home Depot guy handed me a pack of Ryobi blades not sure what type or size yet as I have not opened anything yet. I saw that they have pins at the top. Are there better pins?

-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?


20 replies so far

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2894 posts in 1825 days


#1 posted 05-17-2017 01:41 PM

I would check out another forum called Scroll Saw Village. While I am certain you will get some help on LJ, I think that this other forum will be more helpful.

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AstroEd

24 posts in 212 days


#2 posted 05-17-2017 02:19 PM

Oh, ok so sorry if I posted in wrong place, I will move to Scroll Saw village instead thank you so much.

-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?

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Redoak49

2894 posts in 1825 days


#3 posted 05-17-2017 04:26 PM

You did not post in wrong place as people will be glad to help.

I just thought that a forum dedicated to scroll saws might be more helpful and link is below.

Www.scrollsawvillage.com

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AstroEd

24 posts in 212 days


#4 posted 05-17-2017 04:36 PM

Ahh, Ok I misunderstood, I am a bit slow today my brain is still in bed.

-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5997 posts in 2035 days


#5 posted 05-17-2017 06:49 PM

What are you going to be making – it makes a difference.

Pinned blades are good for general purpose scrolling where you don’t have intricate interior cuts. Plain end blades can be passed through smaller holes for more detailed interior cuts. And with a good blade, you should not need to sand the cut. Finishing is up to you. You might want to get some spray adhesive so you can adhere your patterns to the work piece, and maybe some packing tape. Watch some videos, cut some practice pieces with lots of straight lines, curves, etc… You will figure it out pretty quickly :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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AstroEd

24 posts in 212 days


#6 posted 05-17-2017 08:36 PM

My first interest was to just cut my own blanks for wood burning until I looked deeper into what a scroll saw can do, I am very interested in decorative boxes, Intarsia, and inlays. Inlays will be a long way in the future I am sure as it looks difficult.

-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?

View RJweb's profile

RJweb

112 posts in 2469 days


#7 posted 05-17-2017 09:21 PM

Another site to visit is Steve Good blog, lots of patterns and information, RJ

-- Life Begins @ 190 MPH

View AstroEd's profile

AstroEd

24 posts in 212 days


#8 posted 05-17-2017 09:29 PM

I found him yesterday through his review of the Scroll Saw I wish I could afford LOL. good site.

-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2577 posts in 2758 days


#9 posted 05-18-2017 01:43 AM

I do a lot of scroll saw projects. Mostly making toys and doing inlay. Pinned blades are a waste of time. If your saw will not take plain end blades (not pinned end) you should get a kit to change it to accept plain end blades. Big box store blades are lousy. Get your blades at Sloans or Wooden teddy bear. Either Flying Dutchman blades or Olsen blades. IF you call either place they will recommend the right blade to use for your project. The cut edge while using a scroll saw should be a perfectly smooth cut, burnished in fact. Any sanding would degrade the finish. Spiral blades are the exception to this. They leave a rough edge that will require sanding. I do not use, or recommend, them. Once you learn to follow a line well, with your saw, inlay is pretty simple to do.

-- No PHD, but I have a GED and my DD 214

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

666 posts in 1056 days


#10 posted 05-21-2017 11:41 PM



Ahh, Ok I misunderstood, I am a bit slow today my brain is still in bed.

- AstroEd

hey, youre doing good- my brain is slow most of the time!

boy, ya have a ryobi and dreaming of the seyco- welcome to the addiction that is scrollsawing!

as far as sanding inside cuts, it isnt necessary- the blades leave a really smooth finish.
as far as finishes( applied after the project it cut) the possibilities are wide upen and determined by whatever you feel like usings. some work i do just gets a clearcoat. christmas ornaments i use boiled linseed oil on with no topcoat. some projects i stain. one thing i DONT do is paint ANY of the scrollwork i make. the finish is always something that the grain will show.
prep material- you will probably need a can of spray adhesive for attaching the patterns to the wood. there are different methods for attaching patterns to wood, but thats what i got with.
then a spray bottle with mineral spirits in it- i spray the pattern after cutting, let it sit a minute, then the pattern peels right off and residue is wiped off easily.
a drill press with a variety of small bits( and a good idea to buy them by the dozen) is a good thing to have. a dremel tool can do the job of drilling holes,too. with a drill bit in it,of course.
there are many sites out there selling patterns for what your wanting to make. cherry tree toys,intarsia.com, wooden teddy bear, sue mey, and many others out there.

View AstroEd's profile

AstroEd

24 posts in 212 days


#11 posted 06-05-2017 02:04 AM

I returned the Ryobi to Home Depot unopened and yesterday picked up the Dewalt 788 and about $5,200 worth of other wood shop equipment.

-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?

View RJweb's profile

RJweb

112 posts in 2469 days


#12 posted 06-06-2017 01:06 AM

So what all did you buy, RJ

-- Life Begins @ 190 MPH

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2640 posts in 2009 days


#13 posted 06-06-2017 03:01 AM

You will definitely be much happier with the dewalt than the ryobi. The dewalt has much less vibration, the blade clamping system is much easier to use and blade tension is much easier to set. location of the power witch is much better.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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AstroEd

24 posts in 212 days


#14 posted 06-06-2017 09:00 AM

Main items I got were
Dewalt 13” planer DW735X with stand
Dewalt 20” Scroll Saw DW788 with light and stand.
Grizzly Floor Drill Press G7944
Grizzly 14” Extreme series Bandsaw G0555X
8” Grinder/sharpener
HD Oak Workbench with steel adjustable legs
Router table with stand and Porter Cable router
Shop fox 72” maple table top and legs
Kreg pocket hole jig
Benchtop down draft table
Chisels, saw blades and other accessories
Grizzly oscillating edge belt and spindle sander
6” Table Top jointer with spiral cutter
And 1hp canister dust collector.

-- I measured twice now where is my Saw?

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3644 posts in 2245 days


#15 posted 06-07-2017 01:05 AM

Nice haul, now get prepared for setting up all that for use, finding you need to move it 3 times and man this stuff is heavy. In about 6 months you start to realize hey I need this other new tool that when you get it home requires more moving your other stuff. By the way why did I buy all this stuff to begin with?

LOL.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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