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Forum topic by Tim Dahn posted 11-17-2010 04:38 AM 1827 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Tim Dahn

1511 posts in 3031 days


11-17-2010 04:38 AM

I’m wondering what this type furniture this chest is called, I’m interested in how the side panel of the chest is built.

Here is another that more closely resembles what I’m interested in.

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.


14 replies so far

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ajosephg

1878 posts in 3027 days


#1 posted 11-17-2010 04:49 AM

I’d call it Mission style.

-- Joe

View fussy's profile

fussy

980 posts in 2516 days


#2 posted 11-17-2010 04:57 AM

oR ARTS AND CRAFTS OR CRAFTSMAN. The side panel is frame and panel.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

View Dan'um Style's profile

Dan'um Style

14167 posts in 3449 days


#3 posted 11-17-2010 05:03 AM

sides are 1/4 plywood. Cut the grooves of the rails and stiles about 1/4” deep and mortise and tenon it together. I think is a very attractive look. Great shadow lines and shapes.

I think the side panels are adapted from the shaker style.

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

View swayze's profile

swayze

97 posts in 2554 days


#4 posted 11-17-2010 05:36 AM

The sides could be built from a raised panel with the flat side facing out. Norm built a few pieces this way. It was from the shaker styles. Either way a very nice looking piece.

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Tim Dahn

1511 posts in 3031 days


#5 posted 11-17-2010 02:13 PM

Thanks for the reply’s.

The side panel construction seems to be called frame and panel as Steve said. Definitely has a A&C, Mission, Shaker look to it which is why it appeals to me.

I’m wondering if the frame is glued but the panels are probably loose?

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3964 posts in 2630 days


#6 posted 11-17-2010 04:39 PM

Looking at some furniture in our house, sold by Treeforms Amish Furniture, it appears that there is a similiar panel on a base we had built for an Orchidareum (glass and stainless steel controlled environment), that sits in my office where I am typing this. All of their furniture is essentially built to the order, so we had them make a perfectly dimensioned piece, with an inset tile top. Think it takes 8 to 12 weeks after the order.

The inside appears to be a raised panel, with plenty of room around the edges for the piece to move, such as swayze described. I suspect this is loose. I thought I would be the last person in the world to be able to answer this, but I have been living with an example of it right before my eyes in my own office, for the last 18 months. Our newest furniture is all QSO. That panel is solid QSO, with a stunning ray pattern on the outside surface. These people do nice work. I could try to get pictures this afternoon when I come home from work, if that would be helpful.

Have a good one Timbo….......

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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CaptainSkully

1437 posts in 3024 days


#7 posted 11-17-2010 05:14 PM

They may have started out as Arts & Crafts, but there have been some outside design influences. On the dresser, the square bun feet appear to be a Frank Lloyd Wright influence (see Randall Price’s lamp below). Keep in mind that the entertainment center didn’t even exist when Stickley was designing furniture. The splayed feet design is a considerable departure from anything I’ve ever seen in Arts & Crafts or Shaker, since it involves wasting wood along the entire length of the leg to cut them out. I believe that was just an attempt at modernization and adding an eye-catching tweak. The feet also lighten the piece visually, along with the rather exaggerated arch (which to me looks a bit weak in the middle). Just my cup of coffee thoughts…

Yes, the panel is made from rails & stiles with a centered dado milled down them. The panel can be plywood veneer or solid wood. To really jazz up a project, slice thicker stock down the middle for bookmatched panels. This adds value to a piece that plywood can’t duplicate. Of course plywood will be more stable, but I pre-stain my panels so any wood movement won’t expose unstained wood. Most importantly, the panels are free to float in the oversized “frame”, not glued anywhere. Some people use spaceballs to capture the panel, yet still allow it to move.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3964 posts in 2630 days


#8 posted 11-17-2010 05:40 PM

I have a china closet, sideboard combo piece with the glass fronted china closet sitting on top. Same deal, arch, and splayed feet, but the angle is in the cabinet, not the legs. The sides of both pieces are angled, it is not just the fronts. Quite a bit of woodworking finesse. I cannot comment on whether any of that is faithful or not to the arts and crafts style, and I really don’t care as far as being the owner of the furniture. But I do see splayed legs and angles in what are considered by some to be authentic A&C pieces. Academic, but interesting nonetheless.

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View NathanAllen's profile

NathanAllen

376 posts in 2610 days


#9 posted 11-17-2010 06:30 PM

Combination pieces, which is why A&C is probably the closest. They’re heavily shaker style, but too gussied up on the pulls and curves.

In my opinion if you’re doing the entertainment center the sides should be a vertical mullion, the grain direction is “wrong.”

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1511 posts in 3031 days


#10 posted 11-19-2010 04:59 AM

Thanks again everyone for your input. I am exploring the construction of the side panels not necessarily the entire piece. I have found examples of the frame and panel in A&C/Mission and Amish style furniture so apparently it has some overlap.

Jim, please do post a picture, I went to the Treeforms website but could not find the piece you described.

CaptainSkully, my plans are to as you say Jazz it up by re-sawing to create the bookmatch pattern on the panels, I think that would really be a nice touch. Good tip on the pre-stain too.

I’m not exactly sure yet what or when I will make but it will be a chest of some type…maybe this winter, I have been air drying some oak for a couple years now so it is getting about time to start cutting it up.

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3964 posts in 2630 days


#11 posted 11-19-2010 06:34 AM

OK, Timbo, picture tomorrow. Getting time to get ready for bed…...on call…....and usually try to get a leg up on the sleep…............

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3964 posts in 2630 days


#12 posted 11-19-2010 08:51 PM

Here are some pictures. Photography was restricted due to the position of the piece of furniture (unmovable)
The best illustration of the basic structure is the door, because I could photograph it better, it is built the same way. So I included both.

Here is the outside of the panel:

...and the inside, Note they used pocket screws to attach it to the main part frame of the piece:

The door:

...and the inside:

On the inside of the door you can clearly see the amount of space. It is a simple rabbet all around.

Here is a detail view of the inside of the door:

The panels are probably made exactly like the door, with the frame being 3/4 inch, and the panel itself being about 7/16 inch, with the panel being inset from the frame on the exterior side about 7/32 of an inch. The space left for expansion is about 1/8 inch all around, plus or minus 1/32 of an inch. I don’t know how deep the groove into the frame is, of course, but probably at least 3/8 to 1/2 and inch. So the rabbet is probably 1/2 to 5/8 inch.

Hope that helps…....

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1511 posts in 3031 days


#13 posted 11-20-2010 01:42 PM

Thanks for the pics Jim, they will be good to refer back too. I think the expansion groove is a continuation of the panel tenon. Lots of nice ray flake there.

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3964 posts in 2630 days


#14 posted 11-20-2010 05:52 PM

Yes, the expansion groove is a continuation of the panel tenon, at least that was what I was trying to say. They make very nice furniture, good wood, good finish, good design, and lots of options. We have some Stickley as well, but it doesn’t seem to hold up as well, and the finish isn’t as good.

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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