LumberJocks

Mineral spirits to preview grain?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by Greg posted 05-14-2017 08:31 PM 1359 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Greg's profile

Greg

21 posts in 224 days


05-14-2017 08:31 PM

Topic tags/keywords: preview grain what wood is this

Hi Guys,
Hey, this ties into my post asking questions about refinishing my stair rail which can be see here: http://lumberjocks.com/topics/220289 , but to summarize that thread:
  • 100 year old stair rail, 6-7 layers stain paint varnish, etc. Possibly, originally dye stained (
  • Stripped stair rail (Bit off more than I can chew)
  • Finally down to the wood
  • Still trying to determine what wood it is!!

I have done some hand sanding to even out the color and get wid of the darker areas.

To preview the grain, I wiped the wood with mineral spirits and to my surprise, areas that were dark are coming out practically black.

What’s the best way to preview the wood finish? I think I want a darkish walnuty stain but I’m concerned that the areas that are coming out dark are going to look practically black. I also can’t seem hand sand out those dark areas and I’m wondering if you all might no why.

So, can I ask you all for general advice on next steps, and whether mineral spirits a good way to see what sort of tone and grain?

I will qualify that I’m not looking for perfection here; willing to have flaws, perhaps a patina like result, etc but I’m trying to avoid blotches or colors in the finish that stand out and take your eye away from the overall result.

Very much appreciate all the help I’ve gotten on this never ending, bane of my existence project!!

Below:
Wood before after stripping

Wood after sanding

Wood wiped with mineral spirits


19 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1178 posts in 1637 days


#1 posted 05-14-2017 09:58 PM

Too me the color looks good.The wood looks like it could be mahogany and your probably right if you try to stain it the darker areas will be darker then the rest.
My guess is the darker areas are end grain and have soaked up the original stain if you used a chemical stripper it may have pushed the stain even deeper.So now the wood cells are closed out nothing can be added to it.
I think it’s ready for a clear coat.
Good luck

I said darker four times :)

-- Aj

View mrg's profile (online now)

mrg

786 posts in 2838 days


#2 posted 05-14-2017 10:10 PM

That looks like mahogany.

-- mrg

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4764 posts in 2332 days


#3 posted 05-15-2017 10:37 AM

The mineral spirits trick works really good, but it’s best with unfinished wood. The problem (I think) you’re having is that the wood still has areas that are sealed by the finish….you didn’t get it all, and you probably won’t. The areas that are sealed will appear to be very different from any that aren’t. I’m thinking you can get a uniform look by applying a barrier coat of shellac, then applying whatever your finish will be.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Carloz's profile (online now)

Carloz

982 posts in 430 days


#4 posted 05-15-2017 11:24 AM



That looks like mahogany.

- mrg


Now tell me what kind of fool would paint over mahogany ?

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

1924 posts in 780 days


#5 posted 05-15-2017 01:50 PM

Greg if I were to do this, I would be using an HVLP sprayer and tinted pre-catalyzed lacquer. Using stain on your present situation will probably not yield results you’ll like. In situations like this I prefer a tinted film coat to achieve even tone and the color I want to achieve.

This entryway to my house was rebuilt. There’s some of the original wood remaining plus white oak, pine and poplar. Yeah doesn’t sound good, but it was basically done because the profiled details were not available in oak without a long lead time. Achieving a uniform appearance with those various woods was only going to happen with tinting the coating and then spraying until I achieved the look I was after.

Here’s the link to my thread to give you an idea of what you can achieve with spraying. It’s not as difficult as you may think. You can practice on some scrap wood until you feel comfortable about control and flow of the finish. It’s also not as messy as you might believe using the proper precautions.

This was my first time doing this and it was successful IMO. Since then I’ve done it numerous times with equal success. You just need to get used to using the HVLP sprayer. Won’t take you long.

Entrance Reconstruction

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2716 posts in 1320 days


#6 posted 05-15-2017 02:14 PM

Eric, Wow that is a very nice looking post you’re efforts will be worth it.

A spray finish would look good, but inside the house and all that entails isn’t worth the hassle.

If you want to be done with it I would suggest oil (Danish or Tung) followed by wax.

It should add some depth, and be very simple to apply.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View mrg's profile (online now)

mrg

786 posts in 2838 days


#7 posted 05-15-2017 02:19 PM


That looks like mahogany.

- mrg

Now tell me what kind of fool would paint over mahogany ?

- Carloz

I was being nice, I personally wouldn’t paint mahogany. I would just use an oil finish and call it a day. Let the beauty of the wood speak for itself.

-- mrg

View Greg's profile

Greg

21 posts in 224 days


#8 posted 05-15-2017 06:08 PM

Re: “what wood is this ?” I’ve gotten responses that are all over the map! One trusted wood person suggests that it’s a tight grain wood such as birch, maple, poplar or alder. What may be confusing is what might appear as shiny or shadow (see photo) is actually a portion of the wood that is much darker or lighter areas of the wood itself, so the photos make it look like mahogany but it’s not shiny like this when you see it in real life.

Also, I’ve even to sand out those light and dark areas but even, with hand sanding, it doesn’t seem to be coming out (which suggests it goes fairly deep). So the concern is, when saturated with clear or light colored oil or liquid the lighter brown stays lighter brown but the dark goes much darker. Would it make sense to think of a less penetrating and tinted option where the brown parts go darker but the very dark parts sya about the same?

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

989 posts in 2815 days


#9 posted 05-15-2017 06:16 PM

Lot’s of folks that don’t appreciate wood and are trying to keep up with latest decorating fads! Like, who would want a avocado green fridge :)

That looks like mahogany.

- mrg

Now tell me what kind of fool would paint over mahogany ?

- Carloz


View Rich's profile

Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#10 posted 05-15-2017 06:18 PM


Re: “what wood is this ?” I’ve gotten responses that are all over the map!

It seems like the exact species is pretty immaterial. Knowing what kind of wood isn’t as important as understanding how it was finished and how that affects what you are trying to do.

Not that that helps you, I just felt compelled to say it :)

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View Greg's profile

Greg

21 posts in 224 days


#11 posted 05-15-2017 06:56 PM

I would think that different types wood of wood behave differently with different types of stains and chemicals. I’m figuring that might impact my staining/dying/glazing (etc) strategy. Personally, I like stains and coloring that fit the natural “essence” of the wood, E.g. staining cherry with a walnut color, but there are no rules, right?

Re: “what wood is this ?” I’ve gotten responses that are all over the map!

It seems like the exact species is pretty immaterial. Knowing what kind of wood isn t as important as understanding how it was finished and how that affects what you are trying to do.

Not that that helps you, I just felt compelled to say it :)

- RichTaylor


View Rich's profile

Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#12 posted 05-15-2017 07:40 PM


I would think that different types wood of wood behave differently with different types of stains and chemicals.

That’s absolutely true for working with unfinished wood. My guess is it would be less so for doing what you’re doing. Maybe I’m wrong — it happens all the time.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17031 posts in 2845 days


#13 posted 05-15-2017 08:16 PM

IMO, you can either keep chasing your tail and trying to obtain a “perfect” finished look or you can embrace the age and patina of what you’ve got. I mean youre not going to reverse 100+ years of finish, abuse, dirt and dust without going to some wild extreme. Even then, you might end up with something you don’t like. Id slap some natural Danish oil on that old gal and call it a day. I think its going to look awesome. They always say if ya cant hide it, show it off. Embrace its quirks.

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View Greg's profile

Greg

21 posts in 224 days


#14 posted 05-15-2017 09:45 PM

I totally agree with you re:trying to get perfect finish. I’m trying to keep the patina, wear, etc, but not have odd, splotchy dark or light areas that pull your eye away from the overall result.

I’ve been thinking poly after staining for a maintenance free finish, but I assume oiling will allow me to see one type of result that I guess I could potentially finish over at some point if I want to change it down road…. Hmm. I should try some on a small section and see the result if that makes sense. The only concern then is how much work is involved maintains an oiled finish.


IMO, you can either keep chasing your tail and trying to obtain a “perfect” finished look or you can embrace the age and patina of what you ve got. I mean youre not going to reverse 100+ years of finish, abuse, dirt and dust without going to some wild extreme. Even then, you might end up with something you don t like. Id slap some natural Danish oil on that old gal and call it a day. I think its going to look awesome. They always say if ya cant hide it, show it off. Embrace its quirks.

- chrisstef


View Greg's profile

Greg

21 posts in 224 days


#15 posted 05-16-2017 04:50 PM

Hey Bill

Wanted to get back to you on this. The sprayer, and all the prep and masking involved, might be beyond my pay grade. I’m willing to indulge imperfection to some extent but want to handle some of the more glaring issues. I am starting to make progress, this time doing some general and spot sanding by hand.

Took a look at your link, your stuff looks amazing.

Thanks for your help.

Greg


Greg if I were to do this, I would be using an HVLP sprayer and tinted pre-catalyzed lacquer. Using stain on your present situation will probably not yield results you ll like. In situations like this I prefer a tinted film coat to achieve even tone and the color I want to achieve.

This entryway to my house was rebuilt. There s some of the original wood remaining plus white oak, pine and poplar. Yeah doesn t sound good, but it was basically done because the profiled details were not available in oak without a long lead time. Achieving a uniform appearance with those various woods was only going to happen with tinting the coating and then spraying until I achieved the look I was after.

Here s the link to my thread to give you an idea of what you can achieve with spraying. It s not as difficult as you may think. You can practice on some scrap wood until you feel comfortable about control and flow of the finish. It s also not as messy as you might believe using the proper precautions.

This was my first time doing this and it was successful IMO. Since then I ve done it numerous times with equal success. You just need to get used to using the HVLP sprayer. Won t take you long.

Entrance Reconstruction

- builtinbkyn


showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com